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Chopping a '36 Chevy Sedan

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Woob, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. racer_dave
    Joined: Nov 16, 2012
    Posts: 205

    racer_dave
    Member

    Ahhh, I thought you were going to be able to use a 9 1/2" plate/flywheel vs an 11" plate/flywheel, which would create a large rotational weight savings. If you're using the same plate/flywheel for both then the weight of fiber disk itself is negligible.
     
  2. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Thought through like a true racer. ;) Anyone doing this swap could still use the smaller set-up as you suggested if they have the flywheel drilled & tapped to accept it, in which case that behemoth could be lightened at the same time to further reduce the rotating mass. It would really help to increase the acceleration off the line and out of the turns. I'm looking to get this one to "safe driving" status as a foundation for my brother. I speculate he'll make his own modifications in the off-seasons over the years.

    I didn't look back so there may be some earlier pictures with the trans installed to check the fit etc, but now it's in for good with a functioning clutch. ' much easier to do this way than from underneath:
    [​IMG]

    I'll have to tweak the clutch fork arm just a little to get it to clear the mount when the pedal is depressed fully, but I knew that going in:
    [​IMG]


    Next up will be to have the driveshaft shortened ~20":
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2014
  3. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    I wanted a dual-reservoir master cylinder so I made a bracket:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    and threaded one end of a piece of round stock to match the clevis that connects the push rod to the pedal arm:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    And bolted the whole assembly in. The clutch pedal is just held out of the way with a piece of wire until I finish its linkage.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    The casting plugs showed up so I stuck them in too.
    [​IMG]


    But the front shock mounts have been bothering me for some time now. Back when I did the motor mounts, I left enough space behind them to slip a nut up behind them onto the shock mounting bolt. The problem is I was picturing it wrong. There is no nut to slip in behind the mount because each bolt runs from between the framerails outward and threads directly into the hydraulic shock body.

    So before I put the oil pan back on and still had a little room to work, I wanted to get a drill under the motor mount to poke a hole through my brace.
    [​IMG]


    It would've been a lot easier to do on the drill press had I pictured it right the first time, but the hole saw I used was big enough to get the socket on the bolt head for tightening and future maintenance.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Then I was able to bolt the pan back on.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. wheel shop
    Joined: Oct 7, 2007
    Posts: 52

    wheel shop
    Member

    Any chance you have the tail light stands? I'm building a 36 as well and want to run stock

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  6. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Meanwhile my sons were replacing the valve stem seals.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    We sprayed the gasket with some Copper Kote
    [​IMG]


    Torqued the head. Let it sit overnight. Backed everything off half-a-turn in reverse order the next morning and waited 45+ minutes before re-torquing and putting the rest of the valve train back together.
    [​IMG]


    We bolted on the bolt-ons and Jack and I bent-up a line for the vacuum advance.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Nope. This one only had half of one left when I got it.
     
  8. 61stude
    Joined: Mar 15, 2007
    Posts: 27

    61stude
    Member

    I have one 36 chevy taillight. My car came factory with a single taillight. I'm not going to use it. Pm me.

    Nice build. She's coming along.

    Sent from my mind using H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  9. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Added a battery box in the stock location today.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Last edited: Dec 28, 2015
  11. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Bottom of the grill shell was gone:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    And got set-up for the underside:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Woob, I've been watching since day one. Cool projects and great to see the family involved.
     
  14. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Thanks. [​IMG]

    And we had to get a few things out of the way before the body could go back on.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And the three of us did just that after undercoating it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    lawman likes this.
  15. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Bending and double-flaring some brake line
    [​IMG]

    Leaving it alone to dry after painting
    [​IMG]

    Connecting it to the rear the next day
    [​IMG]

    And to the dual-reservoir master cylinder along with the front line
    [​IMG]

    I've got the front bent and run to the center of the frame where it connects to a flex line leading to the axle. I need to run solid lines from the center T-block, outward towards each front wheel where they will again meet with a flex (that I don't have yet) on each end. That's where I stopped tonight.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. bigheadbaxter
    Joined: Feb 18, 2007
    Posts: 218

    bigheadbaxter
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Any updates Woob? Are you running a hood?


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  17. bigheadbaxter
    Joined: Feb 18, 2007
    Posts: 218

    bigheadbaxter
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had to go back and refresh my memory, I found a pic of the hood on and it looks good.


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  18. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Obviously, from looking at the missing images on the previous pages, the
    duration of this build has outlasted a couple of websites. As you may know, I
    started on it New Year's Day 2011, decided to to give this one to one of my
    brothers mid-way through, around 2013 (that story may already be included
    in the previous posts, I forget), and am hoping to have it road worthy by the
    end of this year (2015).

    Recently, I've modified the original 6V headlight reflectors to accept halogen bulbs:
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    After the chop and channel, I cut a hole in the dash for the steering column's new location. Although I only needed to flip the bracket over behind the dash, here's a shot with it installed in stock configuration for comparison:
    [​IMG]

    and here's where the steering wheel ended-up afterwards:
    [​IMG]

    Drive-able? Yes, if you're into ape-hangers... but I I disassembled the steering gear, took 3-1/2" out of it's length, cut a new key slot for the worm gear and pressed it back together.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2015
    kiwijeff likes this.
  20. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    But now the column pokes right through some of the unseen support bracketry for the gauges. The fix - in my mind - was to assemble the separate gauges and back-lighting into a single instrument cluster. This would allow me to cut
    the lower center out of assembly (where some of the original mounting studs are) and bolt the whole thing in on its perimeter without having to worry about the gauges flopping around in their holes. <-- I hope that description makes
    sense.

    I bring this up mid-stream, because I'd rather do the gauges before installing the column since it's much tighter up there than it was before all of this.

    Top side:
    [​IMG]

    From the bottom:
    [​IMG]

    You can see the nut and bolt (lower center, left) still holding the pieces together. This was only for fitting/assembly while welding. That entire tab got cut-off when I was done since it would be too close to the column in its new location.
    [​IMG]
     
  21. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,106

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    Got any current pictures of the chop?
     
  22. Yea Woob, great to see the thread revived but most of your great photo history fell off?
     
  23. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Here's a quick recap:

    Back chop
    [​IMG]

    Rear wheelwell treament and 4-door turning two.
    (4-door doors are shorter than 2-doors so the fronts required some stretching... 9" if I recall.
    [​IMG]

    March 2014 (1958 235):
    [​IMG]

    August that same year:
    [​IMG]

    July 2015 - Making the Radius Rods
    [​IMG]

    It's hard to get full-body shots right now. The off-topic driver developed a rod-knock and is apart right next to it, but here's one from October this year.
    [​IMG]
     
  24. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Back to now:

    I know a lot of folks shy away from ammeters, preferring volt meters for reasons discussed on other posts, but I don't have a problem with them. This one, however, had a broken fuse holder:
    [​IMG]
    so we fixed it
    [​IMG]

    and painted the instrument cluster white inside before reassembling because white does a much better job of reflecting than does the old silver (It's great for taillight insides too... significantly brighter.)
    [​IMG]
     
  25. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Afterwards we pulled the headlight dimmer switch:
    [​IMG]

    It was well oiled (inside and out) from being exposed to who-knows-how-many-years of a leaking 207:
    [​IMG]

    but it must have become stuck at some point in its life, having a previous operator attempt to mash it into submission, because the dog that moves the switching wheel was bent.
    [​IMG]

    Now at this point some individuals (like my clueless, uninvited neighbor) would be inclined to tell us to go buy a new one. I've even seen the ever-increasing trend of "Speedway has it" responses on this board over the years. Good God, I bet they're only ~$14, but what the hell is to be learned from that? The damned thing wasn't even designed to be taken apart... but it's sturdy enough that it can be. 8^)

    And this guy was not about to let go until he figured out how it did what it was supposed to do and how to make it do it again:
    [​IMG]
    You just can't buy that in a catalog.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    The springs came out in crumbles. Lacking anything usable in stock, I ran out for some while the other son wired-up a headlight harness:
    [​IMG]

    and installed the wiper motor
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  26. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,106

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    Nice. Even if you're going to replace it, taking it apart to see how it works is a good education. Repairing and reassembling it is even better.
     
    Woob likes this.
  27. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Continuing on with the gauges we built a couple of 49 Chevy's $3 Voltage Regulators, one for the stock 6V fuel gauge & sending unit and one for the now-functional clock. <-- The clock is not a simple DC motor-driven assembly as one might expect. They work by controlled gravity/weight much like a grandfather clock except without the pendulum. Modern stuff keeps better time, but this thing speaks to its era.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The cold weather has set-in here for the season, so we brought the Turn Signal / 4-way mount we bent-up inside for an evening of wiring. I wanted a 3rd hand to hold some wires and diodes together while I soldered. My other set of hands had a different idea as I was the one who ended-up doing the holding.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Eventually, he just took over
    [​IMG]

    Blinkers are toggled by the DPDT on the left. The small locking push on the bottom controls 4-ways.
    [​IMG]

    There's a small pin in the cut-out section and a corresponding locating hole drilled into the side of the column to prevent the whole assembly from moving over time from continuous up/down pushes on the switch end.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2015
  28. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    The hold-down lock for the radiator cap on more modern cars is rolled to the outside of the neck. On this '36 it's on the inside and the aftermarket wants $35 - $50 for a replacement cap. I'm sure I could have scavenged around and found something that works, but I had a different thought in mind.
    [​IMG]

    With a holesaw plug left over from making the motor mounts (yes, I save such things ;) ); a scrap of the same conveyor belt I used for the body mounts; a small rectangle cut from some scrap steel; and some hardware, we're good to go:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The slot in the top of the threads indicates the orientation of the hold-down when the cap is installed:
    [​IMG]

    Here's a picture of the first installation. Afterwards, I cut the seal (conveyor belt) down by half for a little more hood clearance and RTV'd it to the metal top. Lacking any copper paint, I shot it with some gold.
    [​IMG]

    The only place it could possibly leak would be through the bolt/stem, in which case I'll add an o-ring, but I'm thinking it won't. The seal around the bolt is already pretty-tight. I'll let you know the next time I run it.

    I also installed a late(er) model light switch in its original, center hole but it interfered with the wiper motor behind the dash so I moved it over a hole to the right. The goofy, chromed plastic knob didn't exactly fit the look so I cut it off in favor of epoxying on the original from the '36:
    [​IMG]

    And with all of that out of the way it was time to turn to cutting-down the vent windows:
    [​IMG]

    This coming January will be 5 years in the works. Getting to the glass makes me feel like we're getting close. Here's where I left off for the night, fitting the lower part of the frame:
    [​IMG]
     
  29. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    ' spent a little time after work this evening finishing-up the driver's side vent/wing window:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    bigheadbaxter likes this.
  30. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Vent/Wing window frame and mechanism installed along with the front window runner:
    [​IMG]

    There may not be glass in it yet, but at least I'm to the point where I can start making patterns:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2015

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