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Technical Chopped my first garnish molding today

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Do it Over, May 21, 2020.

  1. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 375

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    had to chop a garnish molding today so I can install non stock window channel, tracks and lift mechanism. Seems a lot of the work was done by someone less experienced than me. The passengers side molding had six seams and doesn't look as good. I did it in two. No big deal for some but I gave me a boost in confidence and reduced my procrastination. Instead of making more cuts I used heat to bend the molding. Worked out pretty good IMO with minimal effort. I'll work on installing the door glass and tracks 20200520_163228.jpg 20200520_163300.jpg 20200520_163516.jpg 20200520_164904.jpg 20200520_164915.jpg 20200520_165827.jpg 20200520_181735.jpg 20200520_181741.jpg 20200520_181747.jpg 20200520_184040.jpg 20200520_182028.jpg 20200520_184057.jpg 20200520_201322.jpg 20200520_201147.jpg tomorrow.
     
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  2. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,325

    BJR
    Member

    It's the details of getting the glass and garnish moldings and trim correct that make a chop so tedious. And done right makes the chop look factory. Good job.
     
  3. flamedabone
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,729

    flamedabone
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Lots of tedious work to finish a chop, but it all goes into your bank of experience.

    Nice work, -Abone.
     
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  4. brady1929
    Joined: Sep 30, 2006
    Posts: 8,272

    brady1929
    Member

    Nice, great job.
     
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  5. Slopok
    Joined: Jan 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,548

    Slopok
    Member

    No Bondo needed, now go get em chromed!:cool:
     
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  6. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 6,802

    19Fordy
    Member

    Your patience and skill paid off. Will you lay a small piece of metal inside the
    garnish molding and lap weld it over the weld joint as well as butt welding the joint itself
    from the front?
     
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  7. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 375

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    Thanks, I think the butt weld is strong enough.
     
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  8. Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Joined: Apr 20, 2008
    Posts: 4,057

    Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Member

    Nicely done! Smart work clamping or screwing them into the door frame for initial welding. Acts a s a perfect jig and reduces the chance of warpage letting the welds cool "at home".
     
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  9. A Boner
    Joined: Dec 25, 2004
    Posts: 5,570

    A Boner
    Member

    Looking good!
    Probably more work chopping the garnish moldings, than the uninformed keyboard newbie thinks the complete chop would entail.
     
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  10. So true. So many chops have been shown in mags and on line over the years but they only ever show the glory part- outside - never the tedious inside stuff that makes it all work.
     
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  11. 392
    Joined: Feb 27, 2007
    Posts: 1,116

    392
    Member

    Good stuff. Keep on
     
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  12. One might guess that I’ve chopped a few tops. Guys inevitably ask why so much time spent inside and out...and my answer always is that the door jambs and body jambs need to look as good as, or better than factory. No more or no less.

    Great job on the garnish moldings....they can be the toughest part sometimes.
     
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  13. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,102

    The37Kid
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Just noticed the window channel in the lower left corner. I installed the windows in a customers 1939 Chevy Coupe and really liked the GM stuff with a stainless bead on both ends, think I&I and Chevy's of the 1940's carries it. Bob 1939-chevy-window-run-channel-45480big.png
     
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  14. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 375

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    That channel was actually going to hold the GM type channel. It's 3/4" square steel tubing that I cut 1/2" out the center. The GM channel slides down inside and is held snuggly in place. I changed the design when I realized that the GM channel will hold it's shape in the curve and didn't need the extra structure. Got one more brace/bracket to make then I can take it apart and throw some primer on it. I'll post some pics tomorrow. It works pretty smooth.
     
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  15. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 3,838

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nice job! We cut up some 40 pickup windshield garnish molding to make em for a 40 convert--quite a job to get the corners just right--you did a great g job!
     
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  16. Do it Over
    Joined: Dec 25, 2017
    Posts: 375

    Do it Over
    Member
    from NYC, NY

    These are the channels I made to hold the actual window channel.

    20200524_171316.jpg 20200524_171332.jpg 20200524_175232.jpg 20200524_175205.jpg 20200524_171344.jpg 20200524_171337.jpg 20200524_171211.jpg 20200524_171058.jpg
     
  17. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,102

    The37Kid
    Member

    Nice work, really like that GM channel. Bob
     
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  18. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 5,673

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    I just went through replacing all those channels, and fuzzies with stainless trim on my '39 Chev coupe. A lot of work, and many hours spent bending the fuzzy strips to replace them on all the garnish moldings.
    I have a passenger coupe with sliding 1/4 windows, and unfortunately found out one of my 1/4 window garnish moldings was not for the passenger coupe! Chevy used different moldings, and glass for those, so I had to section, and reshape the wrong molding, and weld it back together to match the opposite side. Also had to cut out and reshape for the sliding knob that operates the window slider latch.

    Correct style lower, and sectioned one above.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Metal removed at three places and mig welded back together. Clamped it to the good side during welding t ensure it stayed true.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Test fit to the window.
    [​IMG]
     
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