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Technical Choosing Bead roller dies

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by flatnasty, Mar 20, 2014.

  1. flatnasty
    Joined: Apr 16, 2010
    Posts: 306

    flatnasty
    Member
    from Vancouver

    Ive got to build a floor for my 34 http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=857397

    I'm planning on buying a bead roller to do it but I'm not sure the best choise of dies. They are expensive and I don't want to buy dies that I wont use.

    What are the STAPLE few sets of die's you guys use around your shops?


    Thanks Brad
     
  2. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    We have 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 inch round dies and seem to use the 1/2 most, especially for the type of things you are describing. We use that one a lot more than the other two.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Don
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2014
  3. flatnasty
    Joined: Apr 16, 2010
    Posts: 306

    flatnasty
    Member
    from Vancouver

    Hotrodprimer
    I am planning on buying a Baileigh unit but I was going to get power fed one and it doesn't look like it comes with die's which is why I was wondering what the staple Dies to get were.

    Brad
     

  4. rob bob
    Joined: Aug 18, 2011
    Posts: 446

    rob bob
    Member
    from Canyon TX

    I don't know if the dies are interchangeable with the unit your buying but you might just buy a bead roller from HF an use the dies.
     
  5. metalman
    Joined: Dec 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,286

    metalman
    Member

    Not familer with Baileigh selection, I use and love my Mittler's. Besides the round (I use a 1/4", mostly on race car tin, and a 5/8 for early Ford stuff), a step die is a must have, especially on floors. The other dies I use all the time is a tipping die and a tank roll. We also make our own, often they don't make one to do exactly what I want.
     
  6. jw johnston
    Joined: Oct 16, 2011
    Posts: 106

    jw johnston
    Member

    I have a mitler brothers bead roller and I use a 7/8 die most of the time on early cars into the 40s . It was the biggest one they could supply me off the shelf at the time. They will make bigger ones to order but I think any bigger and it would have a hard time with 16 and 18 gauge. 1/2 and 1/4 also come in handy in a few places on early cars but manly on later cars id say 50s and up.


    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  7. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,937

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    If your building floors, and their usually built from 16 gage or thicker, you'd want the 1/2'' or bigger. The 1/4 '' & 3/8'' would probably be of some utility for '' decrative '' work, but not for use on a ''real'' floor panel.

    There are some tough choices of what machines to buy out there, today! Baighly (sp) & Mitners (sp) both make good products!:)
     
  8. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    We have a ProTools motorized roller and it has worked great for over 8 years and lots of beads. A while back I built a flat table for it to support the work (with lots of helpful suggestions from HAMBers) and that makes it a one man operation now.

    [​IMG]

    Don
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014
  9. In my humble oppinion, as I own a HF roller and have done the much needed structure up grade myself, added a steering wheel adaptor (a big help, but still a 2 person affair) and finally a power motor, great! But I am still stuck with a 18" throat, and limted dies, I do have the HAMB tipping die, really a MUST! BUT! In retrospect my advice is this, you doing one car? Got friends to help? A HF is okay....and it will match your beginning skills, myseld included. But if I were to only know after doing several cars, I would buy a Baleigh or HD36" MB, they do offer a myriad of dies. Good Luck!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,449

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I use the offset die more than anything. I think it's an 1/8 inch. If you can only buy one, buy a 1/4 inch and then you only clamp it down part way to get a nice soft 1/8 inch offset.
     
  11. BAILEIGH INC
    Joined: Aug 8, 2008
    Posts: 3,623

    BAILEIGH INC
    Alliance Vendor

  12. Don,
    I am sure that table makes the roller much, much more user friendly.
     
  13. flatnasty
    Joined: Apr 16, 2010
    Posts: 306

    flatnasty
    Member
    from Vancouver

    Alchemy

    When you say "offset die" is that the same as a "step die" ?


    Brad
     
  14. flatnasty
    Joined: Apr 16, 2010
    Posts: 306

    flatnasty
    Member
    from Vancouver

    Thanks Everyone for your great input!
     
  15. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,449

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Probably. Just basically a step down. By adjusting the pressure, and even moving one of the dies outward a little more than it should, I can make the shape quite different.
     

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