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cheap tool tech.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Count Scrapula, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. Johnnyolds98
    Joined: Jul 6, 2009
    Posts: 110

    Johnnyolds98
    Member

    Just make sure to really use spent shells - otherwise the holes might be bigger or elsewhere than expected ... ;)
     
  2. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Ha ha! I knew someone would say it. Yeah, that would be bad.
     
  3. chevy3755
    Joined: Feb 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,033

    chevy3755
    Member

    very good tech.......
     
  4. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 810

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    Hole punches - I have ground a bevel on the outside of one end of pipe nipples to "sharpen" and used them before, bailed me out more than once.

    Ed
     
  5. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    I keep this cheap tool around for when I'm trying to find a certain shape radiator hose for custom applications. It's a piece of automotive flex duct. Bend it into whatever shape you want your radiator hose to be and it will hold that shape. Take it to the parts store, find a hose that has the same shape and cut it to fit.
    [​IMG]
    You can see this stuf holds it's shape well.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 810

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    Stepson left a couple of golf tee's around. I found them handy for temporaraly pluging vacum lines.

    Ed
     
  7. 6-71
    Joined: Sep 15, 2005
    Posts: 539

    6-71
    Member

    Yes I agree the brake line clip tool is pure genius. I made one,and I used banding material for the clamps,a coworker gave me about 50 feet of the banding and it was just the right width and thickness for the clips. I will have enough clips to last a lifetime with almost nothing invested. I also used the same Roper-Whitney punch to do the holes.
     
  8. great idea simulating a load! gonna steal this one.:D
     
  9. sr808
    Joined: Aug 4, 2007
    Posts: 129

    sr808
    Member

    I already know where I'm going to use the pliers thread chaser. Now I just have to make one. Thanks for posting!
     
  10. willowbilly3
    Joined: Jun 18, 2004
    Posts: 4,356

    willowbilly3
    Member Emeritus
    from Sturgis

    Here's a handy way to pin point vacuum leaks. I took my old mechanics stethoscope and removed the metal probe. Then inserted a couple feet of vacuum hose into the open tube where the metal probe was. Take the end and move it around the carb base or other suspected area. Even the tiniest leak will be very audible.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2012
  11. willowbilly3
    Joined: Jun 18, 2004
    Posts: 4,356

    willowbilly3
    Member Emeritus
    from Sturgis

    Another home made tool I use a lot is my brass drift. I made it about 37 years ago and still use it today. I took about 8 inches of 1" round stock and built up about 3/4" of brass on the end. I used the big 1/4" brazing rod with the gas torch. It is heavy duty and you can really lay into it with a bfh for jobs like removing wheel studs that you want to re-use without the danger of the top going to hell and sending shrapnel. For smaller brass drifts, I salvage the brass rod from old water valves.
     
  12. willowbilly3
    Joined: Jun 18, 2004
    Posts: 4,356

    willowbilly3
    Member Emeritus
    from Sturgis

    Another one I use a lot is my home made spark tester. I just took a spark plug and soldered a big alligator clip from an old battery charger to the side of it. I also clipped off the side electrode. It is usually easy to find a good ground within range of a spark plug wire to clip it to.
     
  13. willowbilly3
    Joined: Jun 18, 2004
    Posts: 4,356

    willowbilly3
    Member Emeritus
    from Sturgis

    Any of us that hammer sheet metal are usually looking for just the right tool. For small tight compound curves I use a trailer ball as a back up. I have a couple I have smoothed up with a flap wheel. I usually clamp one in a vise for smaller pieces I'm making but I am considering squaring off the bolt end to go in the hardy hole on the anvil.
    Another "tool" I find handy for getting a bad crease or dent out of an old fender or panel is a section of an old wooden handle, like a shovel handle, used as a punch. Grind the business end to suit the need and lay a big wooden block down to back it up.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2012
  14. Thanks for thread chaser. Now I have something to all my old pliers to do,

    Lee
     
  15. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Ha! I bought a truck once and when I got it home found that very tick.
     
  16. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Willowbilly3, those are great ideas. I'd like to see the spark tester.
     
  17. Cool as, thanks.
     

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