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cheap tool tech.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Count Scrapula, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. fortynut
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 814

    fortynut
    Member

    I think your 'Count Scapula' handle is very hip. More pressure to make ss could be had with a hydraulic press. Using a hinge on the die is ingenious. Bottoming taps have flat ends and are manufactured specifically for chasing threads but being super hard can break off and cause heartaches and headaches. Also, an old socket on the end, instead of the handle, would let you use a breaker bar/t-handle, or even a ratchet. Thanks for sharing your ideas.
     
  2. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,355

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Damn sight cheaper than a bunch of bottoming taps too.
     
  3. JYPSEA
    Joined: Dec 11, 2007
    Posts: 194

    JYPSEA
    Member
    from Florida

    I think your a fucking genius.
     
  4. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,350

    gatz
    Member

    it's a "torque-limiting device"... no need to worry about going too far into the threaded hole.
     
  5. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    I knew there were taps (bottom taps) for this very purpose, but I didn't have one when I needed it. All three of these tools were made at night in small town America because I didn't want to wait to finish a job. They worked good for the purpose they were used for. To me this is what hot rodding is all about.
    I've routinely punched hole in 16 ga with the punch so 18 ga is no problem. Stainless is not much of a problem either. Remember we're only talkin about 1/2" wide material it doesn't take a lot of pressure.
    Thanks guys!!!
     
  6. it's always the simple stuff thats the best. good stuff.
     
  7. lan240
    Joined: Aug 9, 2010
    Posts: 133

    lan240
    Member
    1. 37-38 Chevys

    Great tool tech.
     
  8. rat pup
    Joined: Jun 8, 2009
    Posts: 142

    rat pup
    Member
    from houston

    Great work, I would have never thought to make a thread chaser from old pliers, good thinking friend!
     
  9. Ditto!

    All the cable TV lines that run under the eaves of my house put up by the cable TV Co. were put up with cheap plastic clamps... They all cook in the FL heat, crack and the lines drape...
     
  10. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 6,588

    117harv
    Member

    On the brake line clamps, if the die was made abit thicker maybe a 2 lb. hammer would form them instead of the vice or a press, just a thought. Very good ideas, the split nut is genius, thanks for posting:)
     
  11. Lowrders
    Joined: Sep 10, 2009
    Posts: 303

    Lowrders
    Member
    from DUBUQUE IA

    seriously have snap on, Irwin, or someone look at that thread chasing pliers, they could make it with interchangeable thread pitches, and use a vise grip so you don't have to hold it.. I'm making one, because it drives me NUTS when you can't fix the end of threads!
     
  12. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    I guess you could use a hammer. I like a vise cause it holds steady pressure on the metal. A press would work good too.
     
  13. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Sorry if you don't think it's worthy 31 Vic.
     
  14. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,222

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    Now come on....
    Saying something like that can only serve to discourage other people who might already be shy to post something...thinking its "not worthy"!

    I think this is excellent tech myself!

    Not every tech post has to be monumental in what it brings to the table.
    Lots of the smaller TECH posts actually turn out to contain tech thats useful to more people.

    Not everyone is gonna need to build a Deuce fender from scratch...but I GUARANTEE anyone who actually works on an old car has buggered up a bolt thread etc.

    Don't sweat it Scrappy....;)
     
  15. T
    How do you guys get that from
    " this in tech week ?"

    There's nothing but a question there.

    I think you BOTH should go look at the first page of this thread and find my post there.

    Never in a million years would I slight, ridicule, correct or add to anyone's tech week entry.
    It think its awesome tech and you should be proud of it.
     
  16. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,222

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    How does anyone get anything else from it??? :eek::confused:

    I will admit to being surprised that you posted what DOES APPEAR to be a negative reply!

    If you meant something entirely different than you really should take time to make yourself clearer.
    That said...if you like the post you can certainly see why I chose to defend it! ;)
     
  17. Oh. You were asking if it was in tech week. When I first read your post I thought you were poking fun too. Reading your first post makes sense :)
     
  18. All I can say is that there is something on your end that is predisposed or skewed if you can rationalize
    " this in tech week?" As a negative or condescending remark.

    Much like you could ask someone, "are you married?"
    Some folks will light up and tell you wonderful things - others will tell you to fuck off.
     
  19. 24 years,,,, fuck off :D
     
  20. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,222

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    No...YOU just fully understood what you meant...because you wrote it! LoL

    all is good...see my PM.
     
  21. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Sorry guys. I guess I just misunderstood. Every time I post something here it seems someone has something smart to say. I'm used to being on the defense around here. Again I'm very sorry.
     
  22. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,222

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    I took it wrong too scrappy and so did some others apparently!
    It's so darn hard to judge just what is meant sometimes, especially when the post is so short!

    Hopefully 31vicky can understand the confusion and accept our apologys for reading him completely WRONG! :eek:
     
  23. Oh yea, its all good and this is a great tech.

    I see its on the list of tech week threads, I didn't see it before

    Good luck
     
  24. Keep
    Joined: May 10, 2008
    Posts: 663

    Keep
    Member

    Those are great ideas.

    For the thread chaser, you could epoxy some high strength magnets inside the plier jaws, then you could use them to hold other "chasers" that way you could use one set of pliers and have a bunch of different nut sizes.

    Makes me want to run out in the garage and try it out! Thats what its all about.
     
  25. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    I was and industrial electrican for over 20 years and this cheap tool was very valuable. I have used it for automotive use too so some of you might find it useful. It's gonna take some explaining so bear with me. I buy wire in bulk roles and build my own wiring harnesses. The bigger the roll the cheaper the per foot price, so I only buy one big roll of black 14 ga. to do most everything. I keep a lesser footage roll of 10 ga. to wire the fuse box. You don't use as much of it as the other. I mount the fuse box on the drivers side close to the steering column. Most wires terminate in this area so I leave them a little long and then cut them off where I need them. I figure up how many wires I need from this area to the back or front. Then I pull that number of wires from the fuse box area to the front or back. I don't bother numbering or labeling at this time and go about fininishing assembly of the car. That's where this tool comes in. The tool itself is just a quick connector block from Radio Shack, a handfull of 10 ohm resistors soldered in series on the back, and a length of wire with an alligator clip.
    [​IMG]
    Here's the back so you can see the arrangement of the resistors.
    [​IMG]
    At the fuse box take one bundle of wires (front or back) and plug the wires in as shown. Take the alligator clip and clip it to a good ground.
    [​IMG]
    Now go the the end of the car you're workin' on and strip a little of the wires. Take your meter (set on ohms) hold one lead to ground and the other lead to a wire. This particular wire reads 30 ohms so that's number 3. Let's say I'm usin' that wire for my right turn signal, I go ahead and hook up the light and then go to the tool, pull the wire from the number 3 spot and hook it up to the steering column.
    [​IMG]
     
  26. Albie
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 174

    Albie
    Member

    Man, I just made the plier chaser tonight, Buggered up a lug nut, spent 5 min making this engenius device, job done, felt like a hero, commenced beer drinking. Thanks!
     
  27. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Ha ha!!! Glad you liked it Albie.
     
  28. Count Scrapula
    Joined: Oct 13, 2004
    Posts: 585

    Count Scrapula
    Member
    from Mid TN

    Here's some more cheap too tech. I always keep some gasket material for makin' my own gaskets in case I'm workin' on something odd or I just don't want to go to the parts store. I keep some spent brass shells of various sizes for use as hole punches. You just place your gasket on a hard surface, locate the shell where you want a hole and give it a light tap with a hammer and it makes a perfect hole. The shells come in all sizes so next time you go shooting with your buddies save that brass. For comparison heres some 460's compared to an unspent 22.
    [​IMG]
     

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