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Channeling a '36 Chevy Sedan

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Woob, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 353

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    There’s a video showing an overview of this post here (youtube doesn't always like my music choices) but I thought I’d take the time to go over some of the finer points about what’s going on with and behind the family sedan project.
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    I’ve been going though the mod process in my mind ever since we picked-up this ‘36 from PJ Garst and I unloaded it into the garage late last year. The more I looked at it, the more the process changed… not the plan, just the process to get there. The temptation is generally to go after the big-ticket items first, but after stripping it down, it was evident that new foundational support was needed… and if you’re going to be working on the floor, there’s no better time to do the channel. Dropping the body three inches will cover the frame nicely.
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    Measuring and marking the drop and where the cuts will be made takes more time than making the cuts themselves, but it’s easier to erase a line than it is to have to weld part of the car back together somewhere and redo it. Note the vertical match lines, one above where it’s going to end up and one below. There were a few throughout each horizontal line and they were well used once everything was cut free. I serious doubt I would’ve gotten the floor back to where it belonged without them. Being in a hurry can cost you more time in the long run.
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    Since I built exterior screw-jack supports ala Ricks Garage in addition to the interior bracing to hold the body securely in place before the floor was cut free from below it, it was necessary to lift the floor up into place to weld where I drilled for spots – hence the frame/body gap in the image below before the whole body was lowered back down.
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    Fast forward to the front and you can see that I took the channel all the way up through the center of the firewall. Since the engine & transmission will be at their stock height in the frame, this will allow me to keep all the available lower foot space. Had I lowered the bottom of the firewall into the floor, I would’ve lost valuable foot space in the column mount /pedal area.
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    Having cut the firewall and floor free; a clear view of the side, kick-panel bracing with its mounting holes over the frame mounts is evident. It would’ve taken 15 minutes at this point to cut-off the horizontal piece with the holes and re-weld it 3″ higher, but I chose to remove the entire structural piece and re-install it higher up the body to accommodate the re-installation of the floor and adjoining kick panels. It took about 4hrs per side to do just these pieces but will be worth it when I put the rest back together.
    [​IMG]

    The front frame mount was not about to allow the body upright to be lowered around the frame without clearing the interferrence in some way. The bottom part of the upright was deeper front-to-rear at its base and had a finishing lip in the back. Needing to narrow its longitudinal profile but wanting to keep the rear lip, I chose to relieve it of its center section (cross hatched section in image). Notice that I did not cut all the way to the top to avoid cutting the rear piece completely free. This was to ensure that the top of this part of the upright will be exactly the same depth as the lower part of the upper piece that still needs to be reinstalled.
    [​IMG]

    In short, it should all look the way factory would’ve done it had they built it 3″ lower. All that was left was to unscrew the support stands and lower the body back onto the frame… at least for now.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011
  2. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 353

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011

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