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Technical Can anyone ID this weird kind of clamp??

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by inthweedz, Apr 15, 2020.

  1. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 2,982

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    And you and your relatives are exact clones as well?:rolleyes:
     
  2. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,875

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    Quick Click Shifter?
     
  3. Andrew Tebbutt
    Joined: Oct 17, 2016
    Posts: 9

    Andrew Tebbutt

    Hi there I’m from the uk just looking at your cramp I used something like this years and years ago , it’s a carpenters tool not joinery , I’m pretty sure it’s a column cramp , 4 of them connect together to go around the wooden shutter to hold it together while the concrete is poured then removed after the concrete has gone off




    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
  4. Andrew Tebbutt
    Joined: Oct 17, 2016
    Posts: 9

    Andrew Tebbutt

    The toothed blade clips onto the casting of another cramp at 90 degrees these a little spigot at the end of the casting and 2 retainers to hold it in place there not powerful cramps they just stop the formwork blowing apart under the load of wet concrete


    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
  5. 56sedandelivery
    Joined: Nov 21, 2006
    Posts: 6,214

    56sedandelivery
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yard art would be my guess; or, a rib spreader for heart surgery/coroner's office. When someone questioned the roofing shingles, I thought, "why would you climb onto the roof to take pictures of them?" I am Butch/56sedandelivery.
     
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  6. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 387

    inthweedz
    Member

    You could be on the right track there Andrew..
    True they are not a powerful clamp, even their construction is light..
    Would you know the ''official'' name of them so I can do a Google search??
     
  7. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 387

    inthweedz
    Member

    Had me laughting as well 56 (why would you go on the roof)..
    I took the pics on the paving stones by my junk shed..
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  8. well if your up there with your fiddle singing you could take the photo.
     
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  9. I am building a cutting board, and I could use a bunch of clamps like that.
    I have some long, turn of the century extendable wood clamps, and they all have a screw type tensioner.
    As a young teenager, I had a summer job building a brick building, and spent plenty of time running around on scaffolding while carrying bricks. The carrier I remember, looked like this. brick clamps.jpeg
    Bob
     
  10. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,425

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    @j-jock

    That seems pretty 'modern'. I seem to recall brick layers 'back when' having helpers who brought bricks to them...called "hod carriers". As I dimly recall, a 'hod' was a wooden angled box like device in which bricks were placed and had a pole like handle on it. The 'hod' went on the shoulder and the pole was held by the carrier....as he ascended a ladder or scaffold to supply the bricks.

    Ray

    edit: found this on the internet

    brick hod.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020
  11. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 387

    inthweedz
    Member

    j-jock..
    When all the covid 19 is finished, and the freight starts moving again, you pay postage, and you can have these two..
     
  12. Ray,
    The picture of the carrier I posted, is functionally identical to the one I was using in 1958. There was another type of carrier I saw, which looked like scissor tongs, but the bricks hung down too far from the handles, they carried fewer bricks, and they did not grip as positively.
    I was working 3 stories up on a scaffold, and we used a hoist to bring the bricks up. My job was to unload the pallet and then use the carrier to move them to the point where the bricklayers were working.
    I have seen the type of carrier you referred to in pictures, but I am guessing that would have been used for small jobs like doing a house.
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020
    Hnstray likes this.
  13. Thanks for the offer.
    I love old stuff like that, and if the shipping cost isn't out of sight, I would love to have them. I still use a lot of antique wood and metal working tools that I have acquired over the years.
    If my cutting board project isn't done by then, you will need to keep me away from sharp instruments or I might intentionally harm myself.
    Bob
     
  14. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,425

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    @j-jock

    I certainly defer to your experience on this subject. The hod I recalled, and found online, is pretty old so far as I know. I am 76 and ‘think’ I remember seeing them being used during my childhood, which would be ‘40s thru early’50s. Now, whether I saw them first hand, or photos, is too long ago to remember accurately. I do know my maternal grandfather was a bricklayer, but he died about 1935, nine years before I was born. I did have other adult family in the trades in those days, so who knows the real source of my recollection. I was just thrilled to find I had not just imagined it. :D
    Ray
     
  15. I am the same age as you, and the only reason I would have noticed one, is because I had to work with it. I was working for a bunch of Italians, and they used a mix of old and new tools.
    Man, they sure made laying bricks look easy. The experience also convinced me, that it wasn't a trade that I would want to work at for a lifetime. The worst part of the job was, cleaning up the brick walls with muriatic acid.
    Bob
     
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  16. ccain
    Joined: Jun 13, 2009
    Posts: 331

    ccain
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    They almost give off a "farm implement part" or "slack adjuster-ish" vibe. You know?
     
  17. Andrew Tebbutt
    Joined: Oct 17, 2016
    Posts: 9

    Andrew Tebbutt

    I think probably in the uk they are column cramps but vintage ones at that in the uk it’s either shuttering or formwork cramp possibly


    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
  18. DIYGUY
    Joined: Sep 8, 2015
    Posts: 866

    DIYGUY
    Member
    from West, TX

    Good that you saved them, but now you need to find two more to have a working set.
     
  19. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 387

    inthweedz
    Member

    Now you tell me DIYGUY, the dumpster that I saved these two from had many many more.. I only grabbed these two out of curiosity..
     
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  20. Thats not how a hoarder thinks o_O.
     
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  21. Boryca
    Joined: Jul 18, 2011
    Posts: 655

    Boryca
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Detroit

    I was hoping this was a solution, but I don't think so after a cursory search... [​IMG]
     
    Texas57 likes this.

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