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Technical Button under molding?

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by hotrod54chevy, Oct 7, 2015.

  1. hotrod54chevy
    Joined: Nov 7, 2003
    Posts: 1,589

    hotrod54chevy
    Member
    from Ohio

    Ok, everyone! I'm sorry if this has been discussed before, but I wanted to check before I do this wrong. If one is shaving the door handles on their vehicle, what is the best sort of button to use when they're hiding it under molding on the car body? High beam switch? Starter button? Waterproof shaved door backup button? I WILL be installing a mechanical backup, but I need help in selecting the electric switch. Also, would a hidden battery disconnect be my best option for using a system without a remote for security, or would I be better off with just a hood lock or a combination of both? Thanks for any advice!
     
  2. Around here most guys use a water proof momentary switch under the rocker and trip it with their foot.

    If you want to go full trad then Lincoln buttons and mechanical is your baby. I did a Ford truck for a guy back around the turn of the century that we left the one door lock and used the key and a lever off the lock to trip a micro switch which charged the solenoid. Pretty clean setup.

    If you are gong keyless entry yes you are well off to use a battery disconnect. I would use a Moroso switch and hide it in the trunk instead of leaving it out through the sheet metal like the racers do.
     
  3. Speedway Motors has a few options click here .HRP
     
  4. hotrod54chevy
    Joined: Nov 7, 2003
    Posts: 1,589

    hotrod54chevy
    Member
    from Ohio

    I've a battery disconnect now, but it's just the screw onto the terminal kind. I was thinking probably just a hood latch of some sort just to keep people from hot wiring it when I park at hotels and such. Thanks for the advice!
     
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  5. On my '40 Chevy I have a switch in my door side molding to roll the power window down so I can reach in and open the door, I ran a hot wire through the jamb and used a relay and a hardware store button with a chrome head. The molding has a small hole that the button just protrudes through. I have a cable to open the door if it dies electrically. The button just completes the circuit to ground so the relay handles the current.

    It has worked flawlessly for 25 years or so but I have replaced a couple relays. I used early GM 12V horn relays which are not particularly water proof. I have both doors open now and will be putting in the new style black plastic relays this winter.
     
  6. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,722

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    On my 54 Chevy I put a house alarm magnetic switch behind the door's stainless. when you put a magnet on it, it closes the circuit, which tripped a relay to actuate the Ball's motor. You can hide them behind anything non-magnetic. like glass, or stainless. So sneaky you might not need a shut off to protect it.
     
  7. 57JoeFoMoPar
    Joined: Sep 14, 2004
    Posts: 4,468

    57JoeFoMoPar
    Member

    Lots of great suggestions here.

    Instead of a battery disconnect, my old Bel Air had a push/pull 12v disconnect for the coil power hidden in the glovebox. That way the car would have full electric power, and would crank, but wouldn't fire. That's something you might want to consider if you wind up using electric solenoids on the doors. You're going to want the car to have power so the actuators work, and a remote set of jumpers so if the battery dies you can get in without breaking a window.
     
  8. hotrod54chevy
    Joined: Nov 7, 2003
    Posts: 1,589

    hotrod54chevy
    Member
    from Ohio

    chopolds I didn't know you had a '54! That's what I have. What model do you have? 210 2 door sedan here. I'd thought about the magnet idea, but wasn't sure how I wanted to actuate everything yet. Either '50 Ford glove box locks like Barris did, a button or magnet under stainless trim, a magnet, or something else interesting. I'm just not sure what I'll use in the end, even though the outcome will be the same. I DO plan on putting manual backups in place. A battery disconnect is kinda necessary. I don't trust strangers around my car, and with some of the factory wiring in tact, I'm always afraid of a surprise dead battery. Thanks, everyone!
     
  9. In prehistoric times, guys used to mount a micro switch (used with a relay) behind a large semi-flexible panel (like the middle of a door or quarter panel) so pushing on the panel would work the micro switch. Usually an eighth of an inch was enough deflection to work it. Some really clever guys mounted the micro switch inside a side moulding and drilled a tiny hole in the moulding to stick something in to activate the switch.
     
  10. fordor41
    Joined: Jul 2, 2008
    Posts: 909

    fordor41
    Member

    I've seen magnetic switches used. Hide the switch somewhere and put a magnet with your keys. Unless some one has a magnet they can't get in, even if they know the spot.
     
  11. Just think it all the way thru.
    If there's a failure how are you going to get in.

    Just the other day I went thru this with a guy. He said "awe fuck it, I'll just bust a window and get a new one. It's cheaper and easier than making a fail safe way to get in" ok ?!?

    The magnets are switches are cool !
    The key like beaner went over is pretty cool too. Remember the old car alarms where they would mount the round key in the fender?

    I'm sure you could get a finger print reader into the door glass pretty soon.

    Pass key technology is pretty common, get a key fob close and it triggers an enable, should also do an enable for the door button or trigger the door too pop open.

    I'd bet you can get a card reader right in the door gap. Swipe your key card and pop.
     
  12. Colin HD
    Joined: Sep 14, 2008
    Posts: 252

    Colin HD
    Member

    Last edited: Oct 8, 2015
  13. scott51
    Joined: Mar 7, 2009
    Posts: 131

    scott51
    Member

    I'm with 31Vicky, the magnetic switches (proper name is a reed switch) are a great option - super small, affordable and simple, but I've been looking into the slightly more secure pass key setup and it seems like it'll be pretty straight forward.

    As far as secure mechanical back up goes I'm thinking of putting something like this in one of the front wheel wells: http://www.allaboutdoors.com/product_info.php?products_id=22214
     
    DBruce likes this.
  14. Colin HD
    Joined: Sep 14, 2008
    Posts: 252

    Colin HD
    Member

  15. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,722

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    A long time ago, I heard a story about a guy who was showing off his "credit card" reading ignition system. Very impressive, he inserted his card into a slot in the dash, and the car cranked over and started.
    Later on, someone found out that he just had a hidden toggle to turn the ignition on, and the credit car just pushed a start button hidden inside the "card reader" slot!
    Hotrod54chevy, I built a mild custom 54 for my GF to drive to shows when I drove my Olds. Monte Carlo sub, and other donated part. Very smooth ride and handling, but too mild for my tastes. Lavender Pearl, and Candy Purple. 54chevy1.jpg es!
     
    hotrod54chevy likes this.
  16. You could mount a magnetic reed switch on the inside of window just hanging out and paralell to the wndow seal. I have seen some which are 1/4" long and about 3/16" diameter.
    This could be actuated through the glass by a magnet. Not many people would know what it was, even if they could see it.
    You could always put a small decal on the window over it to hide it .
     
  17. Buddy Palumbo
    Joined: Mar 30, 2008
    Posts: 3,859

    Buddy Palumbo
    Member

    So to do the magnet switches (correct me if I'm wrong) , all I need are the door actuators, a relay for each, a couple of those Reed switches (I assume readily available online) and a magnet for my keychain ?

    How are you guys attaching the Reed switches to the window, or wherever ? Tape ? Glue ?

    I'm diggin' this method !
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2015
  18. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,722

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    You're correct on the parts list. Not sure how guys are attaching them to the glass, I do them behind the stainless, or up on the corner of the dash, behind the windshield. Attached to the dash, or surround trim, they have to be shimmed up to be right against the glass.
     
    DBruce likes this.
  19. If your'e real clever, you could solder a length of wire (thin hook-up wire) to each end of the reed switch (they are usually shaped like a cigar), and then slip the wires in between the window seal and the window. Or a drop of black silicone to hold it in place.
     
  20. Buddy Palumbo
    Joined: Mar 30, 2008
    Posts: 3,859

    Buddy Palumbo
    Member

    I'm actually excited to try this !
     
  21. enjenjo
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 2,498

    enjenjo
    Member
    from swanton oh

    I have magnetic window switches on my car, tucked down in the lower corners of the windshield stuck in place with two sided trim tape. They have worked fine for 26 years. I also have a hidden push button in case they ever fail.

    I have also hidden micro switches in the quarter panel to activate the door latches, but you need a relay wired into a neutral switch so the micro switch won't activate with the car in gear.

    On a pickup I have used an aluminum plug in the bed roll with a magnetic switch behind it.

    On any car with a battery mounted where you can't get to it without the door being open, I install Moroso jumping lugs in a place where they can be accessed to jump the battery to get in.

    I have hidden switches in portholes on Buicks, in outside mirrors, and in spot lights. I have done them with universal remotes, be careful, some of them are junk.

    I will not do a car that is electric both inside and out, I always use a mechanical lever on the inside of the door.
     
    DBruce likes this.
  22. Micro switch inside door jamb. Slide credit card, or even a key into the gap between the door and the body (or any other gap), to hit the micro switch arm, which activates a relay to power the solenoid.
     
    choffman41 likes this.
  23. racer-x started a thread tonight that raises a question that also pertain to this thread.
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/suicide-door-safety-question.994783/
    How is an emergency person supposed to get the door open on your car after a wreck? He doesn't have a handle to activate and he doesn't have any knowledge as to how the door is normally opened. I'm not saying electric door openers are wrong, just thinking out loud.
     
  24. hotrod54chevy
    Joined: Nov 7, 2003
    Posts: 1,589

    hotrod54chevy
    Member
    from Ohio

    Wolfcreek-Steve, well, in my case, I don't have AC so the windows would probably be down. In all actually, it's just like power locks on a modern car with a dead battery. At least I wouldn't do it like guys really did and replace the manual interior handles with electric buttons! That's just asking for failure! The REAL ones to worry about are the poor low buck guys who think they don't even need a hidden pull cable, let alone power solenoids! I can't count how many threads I've seen where a guy just says "I just leave my vent windows unlocked." Ok, but what if your window is up, you're in a crash, and there's a fire? It's the big "What if?" chance we're all aware of driving older vehicles, and I know it has personally changed my driving in my modern car positively. Yes, I drive like a grandpa, but I don't do half the risky things I did as a teenager.
     
    DBruce likes this.
  25. Uh, break the glass?
     

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