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Technical Building some caliper brackets

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by TA DAD, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    I am in the process of building some caliper brackets to mount disc brakes on a Studebaker axle. I have a Flat 3/8 thick bracket as a starting point and plan on mounting the caliper with pads, shoot a little air in it to hold it in place and go from there. Any tips or advice. IMG_0018.JPG IMG_0017.JPG IMG_0020 (2).JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  2. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    Sorry about my photos being all wrong, I looked and do not see a way to correct them or delete the post and do it over, is there ?
     
  3. you can edit it by hitting the edit button then make your changes
     
  4. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    I looked and did not see anyway to delete the post or the photos. But I might have missed it.
     

  5. look just to the left of the bright red "report" below your texts
     
  6. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,146

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    @TA DAD Click where the arrow is pointing. But do it on your post because clicking on the image below will just be frustrating.


    HAMB Edit1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
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  7. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    Thanks guys ! I think I have it corrected.
     
  8. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,146

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes you do. Now keep posting photos of your progress!
     
    TA DAD likes this.
  9. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 27,544

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The only thing I can say is to fasten the caliper to the bracket the way you will have it when you drive down the road and use something for a spacer between the outer edge of the rotor an the caliper to stand it off the rotor the amount you need it to have the right pad contact. You might even space the caliper off the rotor first and hold the bracket up to the caliper to see what you will have to trim.
    It might be worth your time to pick up a sheet of Masonite or 3/8 Plywood (you can get parts of sheets from Habitat for pocket change) and trace the brackets and cut some out that you can trim and fit to figure out how to trim and fit your steel ones. Lots easier to be able to throw away your mistakes that way.
     
  10. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 193

    brading
    Member

    I would make my caliper bracket something like this. If I had got enough clearance between the spindle face and the disc I would use 7/16" rather than 3/8" for the bracket.
     

    Attached Files:

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  11. Crkrjac
    Joined: Jul 26, 2016
    Posts: 36

    Crkrjac
    Member
    from Waxhaw NC

    51EA7CFC-5863-447D-90F7-A5BACFBFE24D.jpeg F4BB5F82-134A-4E4F-8754-1C4FFC0F3F9D.jpeg BAF0839E-0F96-4730-A240-65F89BDE3448.jpeg Mr48chev has some good advice posted above.
    Here is some caliper brackets I made a few months back. Chevy spindles but same deal. I used a piece of tig wire bent around outside diameter of rotor to keep the clearance I needed between the caliper and rotor. (Sorry I don’t have a picture of that.) I did end up making the brackets twice. Wasn’t completely satisfied with the first ones. Using the above mentioned wood would definitely save you from creating scrap. It can be a little tricky to get the caliper “clocked” where you want it as if you were looking at the wheel face. Also keep in mind where the spindle will be when your axle is set with the desired caster.
    Hope that makes sense.
    Sorry about the off topic vehicle in the background .
     
    bobss396 likes this.
  12. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    Thanks for the pointers guys, I know it is not that difficult but when someone has been down the road they are worth listening to.
     
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  13. KenC
    Joined: Sep 14, 2006
    Posts: 474

    KenC
    Member

    Hijack alert! Are your brackets aluminum? I have a set to build this summer/spring and have be considering aluminum rather than steel. I have a slab of 1/2" already. I like the idea as it is much easier to cut and shape. You can even use woodworking tools, IF you are very careful.
     
  14. Crkrjac
    Joined: Jul 26, 2016
    Posts: 36

    Crkrjac
    Member
    from Waxhaw NC

    Yes they are aluminum. These I made out of 3/8”. I didn’t see a problem doing these out of aluminum since most aftermarket light weight brake kits like this only use 1/4” aluminum brackets. This kit also originally had 1/4”. Not sure what grade of aluminum most manufacturers use? To me something to consider is primary use of vehicle and vehicle weight. The car these are going to be used is primarily drag race with very limited street time. Currently untested. Hopefully this summer!
     
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  15. Aluminum is fine as long as it is a higher alloy like 6061-T6 or 7075 if you can find it. Grade 8 hardware to top it off.
    Look at some of the pictures on Scarebird's site, which will give you an idea of what to follow. Once you get the rotor mounted the rest falls into place. I like the plywood idea myself, good tip!
     
    TA DAD likes this.
  16. I've done this several times. Your on the right track. I have learned you'll probably end up making some templets to transfer to the plate you end up making the actual part out of. I like to make the templet's out of sheet metal instead of cardboard. Seems to give me a cleaner pattern. No doubt some spacers will be needed.
     
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  17. I often start with a couple of pieces of cardboard, (taped together)to get general layout of bolt holes, etc. Then, transfer to piece of MDF, or plywood, of the same thickness as the steel piece I'll use. Great to mock up, and check for fit and clearances.
     
  18. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    I have one roughed in with wood, cutting out more than one pattern was studebaker build 026.JPG studebaker build 028.JPG a good idea !
     
  19. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,238

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    I just made a set for a mopar wavy axle. I bought a pair of rotors and calipers for a 2004 Ford Escape, bought calipers with brackets. I made the brackets where they had 2 1/2 inch bolts at the bottom and 1 7/16 at the top, 1/4 inch steel, and I made them so the factory caliper bracket bolts to the bracket I made. Had to make spacers, 1/4 wall thickness, and I welded them to my brackets. I made up a air regulator and hose deal where I could keep 40 psi on the caliper to hold them in place while I made my pattern.
     
  20. Okay, you have the Caliper mounted on the Rotor. My advice would be to use more than 2 bolts to mount it on the Spindle. Add an ear to pick up the top bolt hole on the other side of the King Pin. Adding a 3rd bolt will make it less likely to sheer off the lower bolt the first time you get on the brakes firmly.
     
  21. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 193

    brading
    Member

  22. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    Not bad, this went pretty smooth. I have the first one finished and it fits good. Where the caliper bolts pass across the rotor one bolt is sixteen thousands of an inch closer to the rotor than the other and I can live with that. I ended up using a Speedway weld on bracket and it is 5/16 thick ( I thought it was 3/8 ) most of the braclets on the market are 1/4 inch so this will be fine. There are three 3/8 IMG_0031 (2).JPG IMG_0032 (2).JPG IMG_0034.JPG bolts mounting it to the spindle.
     
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  23. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,146

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Looks good! Does your spindle stop limit the amount the spindle can turn before the caliper contacts the axle? The photo looks like the caliper might hit, but could just be the angle at which the photo was taken.
     
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  24. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    Thanks Ebbsspeed, clearance is good I do not see any problems but I still have to do the otherside. I still have a little tuning to do on the rotor. I had to space the rear bearing race off its seat about 200ths and I found a valve seat almost the perfect size for that and I have to cut a few more threads for the spindle nut so it will not need a extra washer.
     
  25. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,238

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    Looks real good. Mine has 2 1/2 inch bolts on the bottom and 1 7/17 on top. I used 1/4 inch because my brackets are short since I used the factory caliper bracket, plus I doubled it where the 2 1/2 inch bolts are.
     
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  26. fordor41
    Joined: Jul 2, 2008
    Posts: 921

    fordor41
    Member

    seems like a lot of stress centered on the 3 bolts in your center pic. I think I'd add a
    seems like a lot of stress on the 3 bolts to the left in the center pic. I think I'd add a torque arm to the top right bolt
     
  27. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 193

    brading
    Member

    I am with " fordor4l " on the idea for a torque arm.
     
  28. Anything you can do to make thin brackets less bouncy, less springy, will help tremendously, including better caliper support, less thin-bracket flex, and please add a CALIPER SUPPORT TAB.
    If you find a softer pedal that wont bleed out, look for flex or a caliper slightly squirming under a load.
    I sometimes see that prob mentioned in other threads without the squirming caliper being mentioned.

    MANY, if not MOST, aftermarket cheap brackets have those probs built in.
    I see that fordor41 spotted it right away. :)

    20200127_075205.jpeg

    Here is what I used to do when I used to make these by the hundreds.
    I recommend trying to catch bolt holes and support from bolts on both sides of the spindle brake-mounting flange.
    That hugely cuts down the stress and strain from only using a few bolts all in one small area.
    An "arm" reaching across to a farther away point makes a huge difference in bracket flex and brake pedal sponginess too.
    I am showing the different spacers I weld on the 3/8 brackets to accomodate the different offsets depending on the different rotors used or axle offsets.
    The easiest way for one-off's where you dont want to invest the time or money building a repeatable jig is to mount the caliper on the bracket with pads etc, and slip it over the rotor, then measure what spacer is needed between bracket and spindle to carry the caliper where you want it.
    For one-offs I would assemble it all, then mig or tig some tacks to hold the spacers to the brackets, then unbolt everything and then finish bench welding the mounting spacers to the bracket for one strong solid one-piece assembly.
    I know that most aftermarket brackets are flat plates, BUT that lets the calipers twist crooked every time the brake forces are applied.
    If you notice the caliper support "wings" on GM factory brackets, you will see where the calipers need support in order to stay straight when the heavy forces are applied.
    AT THE VERY LEAST, I would weld on a triangle piece at the top of the bracket to keep the caliper STRAIGHT as the heavy braking forces try to cock the pads and caliper slightly to one side.
    If you have a mysterious "spongy pedal" or uneven pad wear after many miles. THIS IS ONE OF THE MANY CAUSES.

    20200127_081954.jpeg

    20200127_081946.jpeg

    And ALWAYS ALWAYS weld on one of these caliper support tabs to keep your caliper straight, instead of letting it twist around under braking forces.
    I often simply weld on a small triangle, then file it lightly to fit right up against the caliper to keep it in close contact.
    Without caliper support at least on the heavy-load side of forward braking, you will have CRAPPY BRACKETS like TWO THIRDS of aftermarket brackets are.
    SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL CALIPERS. It makes for a better neighborhood. (I twisted an old tv public service announcement)

    P.S. For Studebakers, if you use 3/4" round bar stock center-drilled for the 3/8 bracket bolts, they will fit perfectly the factory bolt recesses in the spindle to provide a solid wiggle-free mount.
    I kept a few buckets filled with different sized spacers made in advance for different axles :)
    Snug fit = perfect.




    WHY BE ORDINARY ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2020
  29. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 257

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    The front brakes are done, had new bushings installed in the springs. Just about have the steering completed. IMG_0016 (2).JPG
     

    Attached Files:

    tb33anda3rd likes this.

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