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Projects Building My First Roadster in San Francisco

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by J.Ukrop, Sep 7, 2020.

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  1. Woogeroo
    Joined: Dec 29, 2005
    Posts: 1,097

    Woogeroo
    Member
    from USA

    J.Ukrop - jeez, that reminds me of when I was trying to reinstall the parking brakes on my '65 Chevy C10. Everytime I thought I had all of the parts, cables and guides, I'd find out another piece of the puzzle was missing, took several go arounds and lots of question asking online to get all of the information and parts I needed inside and outside of the drum.

    Finally got it done tho', it helps when you have all of the information. :D

    But look at it this way, if you have to do it again, you'll know how now.

    -Woog
     
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  2. modelacrazy
    Joined: Feb 24, 2011
    Posts: 87

    modelacrazy
    Member

    On the brake issue I noticed a lot of touring A guys are using an aftermarket cast iron brake drum on the mechanical brake systems with much improved performance. It seems the OEM drums can grow as they heat up because they are stamped steel and most likely thin after a few brake jobs and 90 years of service. I think I’m going to put a pair on the front of my project, eventually a rear set too. Worst part of the swap (expense wise) would be swedging new studs. Figured I might mention that, I heard there were like 3 hills in your neck of the woods, lol
     
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  3. sloppy jalopies
    Joined: Jun 29, 2015
    Posts: 4,440

    sloppy jalopies
    Member

    model A had the windowed drums,
    '32 did but memory says they were larger than the As and didn't have the re-enforcement ribs that '35's had... i don't know about '33-'34...
    if the A windowed drums are too hard to find, try the later brakes...
     
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  4. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
    SUPER MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    That's exactly! I'm gathering as much info as I possibly can to go out there and do it right—even if it takes a few tries.

    I gave that a great deal of consideration, but I ended up not taking that route. Instead, I found front drums that were in almost new condition and had reinforcement bands welded on and the drums turned. The bands will help with both strength and cooling.

    Yep, we got hills. All kinds of hills. Tall ones. Short ones. Wide ones. Narrow ones. Ones that make you feel like you're on a rollercoaster and others that are so steep that they need to have stairs cut into the side for pedestrian traffic. I love this city, but it's tough on cars. I'm hoping to build mine to be tough enough!

    I still sometimes dream of those Rocky Mountains...
     
  5. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
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    Staff Member

    IMG_2687.jpg
    My swivel slide links showed up today—plus some great literature. I'm looking forward to setting up the linkage once I get the brakes figured out.
     
  6. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
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    Right before lunch, the doorbell rang. I rushed over, signed and, just like that, I had the next piece of the roadster puzzle.

    Even though my build has been following the traditional hot rod formula, I've been working pretty hard to find ways to make it uniquely mine. Just like on choppers, I feel like so much personality lies in the taillight(s). Very early in the build, I bolted a set of old bullet marker lights at the bottom of the rear wheelwells. I didn't plan to keep them on there long. Well, they grew on me, so they're staying. (Except for in the photos below, where I've taken the driver's side light off to install a new bulb).

    Initially, I was going to put my Duolamp taillight in the middle and call it a day. I like that look. But the more I thought about it, the more I wanted something to match the era of my bullet markers. I'm excited to say that I found exactly what I was looking for. IMG_2693.jpg Here it is mocked up with magnets.
    IMG_2694.jpg
    From the ribs and the tapered lenses to the old repair and the pitted chrome, I feel like it's the perfect mix of Art Deco and mid-century style.

    It's no secret that you guys know a lot more about this type of thing than I do, but I figured it would be fun to set up a little contest. I have a prize for the first person who can tell me what make and model of car this taillight/license plate light came from. Bonus points if you can guess the year. Let's hear it!
     
  7. Just a wild guess. 1938 Desoto.
     
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  8. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 11,895

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    ^ that’s a solid guess!
     
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  9. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,666

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    You are going to start a trend or even a new tradition. :cool:
     
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  10. adam401
    Joined: Dec 27, 2007
    Posts: 2,348

    adam401
    Member

    The roadster is looking great. I like the new rear light. This is what its all about. Carefully curating a selection of parts and small details. This is what gives a car texture and soul.
     
  11. 345 coupe
    Joined: Feb 27, 2017
    Posts: 7

    345 coupe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Joey, The chopped and laid back windshield with the canvass top looks really cool. However, inmy opinion, the new rear light and license plate location truly make the roadster yours. Also very cool.

    Ron
     
  12. I'm really digging that top
     
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  13. Can I take a second wild guess on the taillight?
    How about 1941 Hudson?

    Is someone trying to find a photo match on the interwebs?

    Lots of questions, no answer yet.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2021
  14. vinny harms
    Joined: Nov 23, 2019
    Posts: 247

    vinny harms
    Member
    from Texas

    That taillight looks like tiny 59 chevy taillights

    Sent from my SM-S111DL using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  15. I spent a half hour already!
    Can't find it yet!
    Went through the usual suspects from Chrysler products and nothing!
     
  16. Chrysler corp used a lot of similar light setups in the late '40's. My money is on Mopar. vintage-1950s-dodge-trunk-opener_1_c2058253dae83c254d3a169d21217f73.jpg
     
  17. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,432

    51504bat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ask @squirrel
     
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  18. JB401
    Joined: Aug 30, 2020
    Posts: 114

    JB401
    Member

    I dig the plate light! Nothing saying you can’t start new trends. Hod rodding is about using what you have in many cases. My wild guess on the light is going to be 40s or 50s Plymouth
     
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  19. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
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    Thank you! I work pretty hard to carry those same principles across the board, whether I'm setting up the shelves my sunroom or finding the perfect waterslide decal for the oil tank of my chopper. It's all about cohesion.

    Thank you! My goal is to save up enough money for top irons by the end of 2021.

    Good guess, but not quite...

    Doesn't it?! Kinda crazy.

    It looks verryyyyy Chrysler, but it's not.

    Shades of Mopar for sure. However, it is not.

    I have a feeling he will :D

    Thank you! This light definitely fit the budget. It would be crazy to see another early Ford with one. I wouldn't be mad!
     
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  20. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
    SUPER MODERATOR
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    Lots of good guesses—I'll give the night shift a shot and then I'll post the answer during lunch tomorrow. No real progress to report, other than getting ready to shop for more parts. There are so many little things that I need to buy, but I'm chalking them up as start-up costs.

    When it comes to tools, I try to buy used whenever possible. Garage sales, estate sales, eBay, Facebook Marketplace—you name it. But after seeing David's Eastwood flaring tool, I decided to splurge. With any luck, I have 50 more years of hot rodding ahead of me, so I figure this will be a sound investment to do quality work. Best of all, I got the Alliance discount!
    IMG_2704.jpg
    Additionally, I sketched out my plan for the taillight. I'm a very visual person, and seeing the drawing helps me familiarize myself with the assembly while also creating a parts list.
    IMG_2703.jpg As an aside, I'm working on an interesting Jalopy Journal feature that I'll share on here next week. One of the guys I'm writing about sent me this picture and I figured I'd share it here. Not for my build obviously, but I love the louvered doors.

    IMG_2751-1.jpg
     
  21. Time is running out. My final wild guess is 1946 Buick?
    Looking forward to the real answer. But, some will want photographic confirmation.
     
  22. Joey,
    You beat me too!
    I'm done looking!!!!
     
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  23. trevorsworth
    Joined: Aug 3, 2020
    Posts: 413

    trevorsworth
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I bet we’ll all feel dumb when he tells us.
     
  24. BirchRidge
    Joined: Nov 3, 2010
    Posts: 33

    BirchRidge
    Member
    from sweden

    I vote for a late 50’s Gaz m21
     
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  25. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,499

    J.Ukrop
    SUPER MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    BirchRidge nailed it! It’s a mid-to-late '50s Gaz M21 Volga decklid light. These cars were built in Russia, and I got this particular piece from Belarus. Although it doesn’t exactly fit the timeframe of the build, it works from a style standpoint—and I can’t wait to wire it up and get it bolted into place.
    [​IMG]
    (Not my photo)

    From the factory, the light assembly had an illuminated placard on top. At some point in the past 60 years, a previous owner shaved the placard and riveted a piece of metal in its place. It’s a little bit rough and has plenty of character, which makes it a perfect fit for my car.




    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  26. Well done BirchRidge.
    I thought your answer was a Russian military truck!
     
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  27. Very neat story. Love the piece. I could have guessed forever and would never got it.
     
  28. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,666

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    "It's all about cohesion." Einstein could not have said it any better! Relativity, it's not just a young guy putting and old car together. It's about the parts and their stories, the place and it's history, the guy and his friends, and the onlookers and their memories.......... cohesion.

    I never noticed how few rear views of old cars there are on the internet. :rolleyes:
     
  29. BirchRidge
    Joined: Nov 3, 2010
    Posts: 33

    BirchRidge
    Member
    from sweden


    They actually were called “tank in an evening dress” up here in Sweden and Finland. And Joey, love the roadster and the way you’re going with it
     
  30. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 468

    guitarguy
    Member

    The stories and journeys are so great. And it just goes to show there are some really cool people out there who want to help and be supportive. My build is no different, although I tend to leave alot of the story telling out....maybe I shouldn't.

    Joey, you are killing it. I love the build, I'm a banger guy so I will be sad when it goes to a V8---But none the less, the car and the story are captivating, I'll be watching until the end.
     

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