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Art & Inspiration Bueglar pinstriping

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Jerrybigbird, Jan 18, 2017.

  1. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    Did a hamb search....got nothing so i figured id just ask. Im thinking about buying a bueglar pin striping tool and was wondering what YOU guys thought about them. Most of what Ive been sering involves free hand blush work and i can see why a guy would keep some brushes handy but most guys seem to prefer the brush. I worked with a guy when i was younger in a window tint/pin stripe shop but all he used was vinyl striping. Im not a professional painter or body man or anything like that. Mostly just thinking about a new hobby. Thoughts? I figured a piece of glass to practice on Might be benefical.
     
  2. dreracecar
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 3,183

    dreracecar
    Member
    from so-cal

    They are industrial type stripers and take around the same amount of time and effort to learn as would a brush. The guy at the swap meet has been doing it for years and on a flat piece of paper, I have never seen a fender in his booth.
     
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  3. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    That guy is pretty slick but it looks like he prefers the brush also
     
  4. The ONLY advantage to one is pulling long straight lines. If you want designs, pick up a brush.
     

  5. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    K that kind of what i was wondering. I saw the magnetic guide for pulling lines but from the hobby persective intricate desings is what im after.
     
  6. Nice for striping flatbed trailers.
    That's about it
     
    da34guy and Montana1 like this.
  7. I have one and I've tinkered with it a bit, I find it as hard or harder than using a brush. Pain to clean etc. too. @safarinut might chime in, he's got more experience than most with brushes and I'm pretty sure he had some buegler wheels in his box last time I saw him.
     
  8. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    and wheels apparently. Lost of video of people doing wheels with them
     
  9. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    Glad i didnt jump into one. Maybe i should get a pinstriping book first. Any suggestions?
     
  10. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    And man i really like alot of the von dutch stuff
     
  11. Binger
    Joined: Apr 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,730

    Binger
    Member
    from wyoming

    I picked up some brushes and some one shot and practiced. I am not very good and could be better if I did it more than once in a while. LOL. I have seen a great book but cant remember the name. I will look and see if I can find it.
    I think I picked it up at Barns and Nobel.
     
  12. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,766

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    I've used the Burglar kit with the magnetic guide strip for belt line stripes on OT cars, tool boxes and riding toys. It is what it is and easy to use.
     
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  13. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    Maybe ill pick one up just not the $400 one
     
  14. Practice before you use it, and don't use much pressure. If you goof and remove the stripe the notched wheel will put marks in the cars paint that are difficult to get out.

    Mick
     
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  15. Can you put a small rubber band over the wheel to stop it digging into the paint?
    I have looked at buying one of these, but it sounds like the dagger is the go.
    I like the style of that bloke striping the gas tanks! At least there are some things made which still done by hand.
     
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  16. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    hell of a lot cheaper lol
     
  17. That makes me sick.....I can't even write my name without messing up...
     
    dan31 likes this.
  18. Gearhead Graphics
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 3,851

    Gearhead Graphics
    Member
    from Denver Co

    Its a good tool, but takes time and practice just like a brush. The biggest downfall to me is how much cleaning work it takes. you've got to CLEAN it perfectly after every use. I don't use mine near as much as I use my brushes. Though on long lines its my go to. eventually id like to be able to brush them... but it kicks butt.
    Has its pros and cons like any other tool
     
  19. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 7,847

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I played with one at SEMA a few years ago on a hood they had in their display. Stick the magnetic guide down, put the little runner on the paint gun in the guide and drag it. A sober monkey could lay down straight lines with it.
     
  20. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 7,042

    BJR
    Member

    I used one to put the factory character line pinstripes back on my 32 Hupmobile years ago. Worked great with very little practice and looked factory. Like was said, great for long straight lines and wheels. Freehand stuff not so much.
     
  21. 1pickup
    Joined: Feb 20, 2011
    Posts: 1,087

    1pickup
    Member

    I bought one years ago. Tried it out at the swap meet before I got it. It was a lot easier to use on his pad of paper, than on a car. Never really used it much. Been on the shelf for years. Wanna buy a cheap one?
     
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  22. I use mine on wheels. I set up a guide on the outside of the wheel lip and use a rotating spice rack to turn the wheel.
    Yes, It takes practice. Yes, its has to be clean, real clean, as the wheel cannot bind.
     
  23. metalman
    Joined: Dec 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,284

    metalman
    Member

    I bought one back in the 70's, watched a guy selling them at a car show doing all types of designs on a pad of paper, made it look easy. Let me try and it was pretty easy. Found out there is a lot of difference on controlling it on slick paint compared to that paper! Like others said, too big a pia to clean for what it's worth, I went back to brushes.
     
  24. Von Brush
    Joined: Nov 20, 2016
    Posts: 99

    Von Brush
    Member
    from Corfu, NY

    If you want long straight lines get 3M fine line tape with pullouts. Just pull out the width lines you want and then brush in or spray the colors you want.

    Sent from my QMV7A using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  25. Not much to add to what others have already stated.It works best on horizontal surfaces;is time consuming to clean up afterward;harder(though not impossible)to learn to do designs with. Downside to them is that if you have to stop in the middle of a line,you cannot put it back down on the line without it blotching.Usually have to start up an inch or so away and then fill in with a brush afterward. Paint consistency is very critical as too thick and the wheel will skip;too thin and the paint will run. Not like a brush where you can modulate the paint consistency as you work.
    I found it useful for doing a series of 1/8th inch lines spaced 1 inch apart on an 8'x16' metal sign.Still took a long time to re-locate the magnet but it was easier than using a brush. The customer bought it for me as a condition of my doing the sign. Tried it a couple times afterward before relegating it to my paint box. Gave it away a couple years ago.
    I have a couple of variations on the Beugler. One was made by DeVilbiss about 1925 and uses a gear pump setup driven by the paint wheel to deliver the paint from the reservoir with a return port for excess paint. Haven't tried it but it looks like it would work OK.
    The other is by a company called.AERO-NAT and was supplied to the factories for doing their striping. The reservoir is tilted toward the vertical about 15 degrees and to start the paint flow you press in on the wheel. Haven't tried that one either.
    Here is a pic of one I would really like to try out but it is missing some parts and I haven't been able to locate them. A pistol grip Paasche striping tool that looks like a spraygun but dispenses paint through a thin nozzle as shown in the instructions. Bought it at a yard sale for $2. VintagePaintEquipment 015.jpg VintagePaintEquipment 016.jpg DeVilbissAS-601StripingTool 001.jpg DeVilbissAS-601StripingTool 003.jpg IMG_1897.JPG IMG_1899.JPG IMG_1904.JPG
    I prefer doing long lines with a #3 Mack that is older than I am.
     
  26. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    Thanks for all the input guys.
     
  27. Never heard of em.
    Thanks for helping me to learn something new today.
     
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  28. Jerrybigbird
    Joined: Oct 10, 2015
    Posts: 178

    Jerrybigbird
    Member
    from Montana

    neater than shit if you ask me i just Heard of them too
     
    kiwijeff likes this.
  29. 41woodie
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 1,095

    41woodie
    Member

    I shake so bad that any striping I did would look like an EKG
     
    ravedodger likes this.
  30. Graystoke
    Joined: Mar 23, 2010
    Posts: 414

    Graystoke
    Member

    These things have been around since the 1930s. I bought a used one cheap, and it is great for striping straight lines on furniture. :) I use acrylic paint in it and it cleans up easy with soapy water. If you use enamel then you'll need a lot of solvent.
     
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