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Customs Bringing out old paint by hand, any tips?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by imbroke, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    I know I should get ahold of a grinder style multi speed buffer. But I’m uncomfortable taking something like that to my old paint. I’ve done half of the car by hand and I’m happy with the result but it’s a pain in my ass! I’ve been using turtle wax polishing compound, I’ve tried the rubbing compound and got the same results. I’m not expecting a miracle, just want the blue on my Fairlane to look blue and not grey. Does anyone have some good tips or products that may work a bit better? I’ll attach a some pics of what I’m working with, driver side before and after. Thanks much in advance. IMG_1635.JPG IMG_1646.JPG


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    chryslerfan55 likes this.
  2. Meguiar's.....M105 then M205 compounds...the least aggressive that gets the job job is the preferred method. Probably do not need to wet sand but that is an option prior to polishing...1000 grit or better.

    http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?12-Extreme-Makeover-Before-amp-After-Pictures

    An electric polisher like a Porter Cable can save you time, but you can get burns/cut throughs especially on edges. Be careful, there's no do-over button.

    Think you got a lot of work? check this out...

    https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/s...-piece-of-American-History&highlight=polisher
     
  3. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    Good lord! That’s some work, I stop bitching about my work I guess! Thanks for the advise. That’s exactly what I was worried about with a electric polisher, it’d be my luck I’d burn through the paint.


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  4. Luke stone
    Joined: Sep 5, 2017
    Posts: 110

    Luke stone
    Member

    I'm not a massive fan of Meguires products find them hard work for hand finishing. I use poor boys products and there ssr range is very good for paint renovation and removes stuff a lot of other products I've used don't it comes in stages I'm sure the higher the number the coarser it is. It may be worth using a clay first that will remove all the surface contamination before attempting to revive the paint finish then the ssr then a wax or a glaze. If your not familiar with detailing clay search it on YouTube to get an idea of how it works it is good stuff.

    Machine polishing is ok aslong as you use the correct pads and the right polishes together don't let it dry out and get carried away and mask edges and swage lines to help from burning through plus I always make a mess that takes longer to clean up
    Luke
     

  5. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 3,006

    oldolds
    Member

    Wash it with Comet or similar cleanser and a firm sponge. It will get most of the dead paint off then polish at will. I sold a lot of used cars in the 80's before clear coat became common. Cleaned a lot of dead paint cars that way.
     
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  6. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,798

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    I'd say you are wasting your time. not all types of paint will buff out, your car look like one of them.:(
     
  7. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,266

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Try a clay bar first. You are right to do it by hand if you are not used to the buffer. Take a break and come back to it if you get tired. Do one panel at a time and wax it so it won't dull again.
     
  8. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,797

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Most likely, your paint is old enamel, if not painted in the last 20 years, or so. It's going to be a chore to get it to shine. My advice to anyone attempting this, is to try the mildest solution on a small area, and see if it works. If it doesn't, go to the next more aggressive treatment. If that doesn't, go to the next. When you find a suitable method, work your way back up the scale to the mildest treatment (or wax or glaze protection...not the same as polishing!)
    Scale from mildest to most aggressive: Pure carnuba wax, hand liquid polish/glaze ( like Meguire's # 3), liquid swirl remover (Meguire's # 9), Liquid polish (Meguire's #2 or 205), Microfine polishing compound (Meguire's # 105, or M85), 2000 wetsand, 1500 wetsand, 1000 wetsand.
    If you need more than 1000 grit wetsanding to do the job, you're in danger of thinning old paint out too much. Even the less aggressive grits can remove too much paint. You have to be careful, try small areas, and stay away from edges, and high spots like body lines, and ridges.
    The compounding and polishing steps can be done by hand, very labor intensive, but a rotary machine is quickest (and quickest to do damage if you're not familiar, and skilled), a DA type polisher is more user friendly. Use the correct polishing pad with each step, as well. Even the waxing/glaze can be done by a dual action machine very satisfactory.
    An old enamel job like your's probably needs at least a 1500 or 2000 cut to start, in my experience. Might need more aggressive work, though. Of course, more work with a compound will often take the place of a sanding.
     
    BJR likes this.
  9. forgot to add: Nice Fairlane
     
  10. If it's a repaint, you may not get a good gloss. I bought a truck years ago that I couldn't get a shine on with anything, including most of the methods listed here.
     
  11. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    I’m really not expecting a lot out of it to be honest with you. In comparison to the grey it was in that top picture, I’m happy with the blue I got in the bottom picture. I’m just looking to make it somewhat easier, or use something that’s easier to work with. I bet if I used some comet and a stiff sponge it would make buffing it that much easier.


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  12. I took an entire weekend with a buddy to rub out [Dupont rubbing compound] and wax [blue coral] the yellow and white factory paint on my trusty ol 55 Olds by hand. We were both sore for a week! Photo prolly doesn't show the reflections but it shone like a new dime in a goat's ass! So to speak. 55olds.jpg
     
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  13. 1oldtimer
    Joined: Aug 21, 2003
    Posts: 7,491

    1oldtimer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've done 5 vehicles over the last few years all came out pretty good, some started with decent paint all the way to oxidized white. I used Meguiars ultimate compound, then ultimate polish, then to #7 (this makes a HUGH difference in single stage paint) and finish off with ultimate wax. All done with a porter cable variable speed polisher and 3 foam pads (cutting, polishing and finishing)....it makes it almost impossible to burn through unless you fall asleep on the trigger. I've color sanded and buffed it back out with an old, heavy, chrome polisher which works great but you have to know what your doing or you can kill the paint really easily.

    There's still lots of rubbing involved getting each layer of product off, another tip is don't do any waxing/polishing in the sun, it makes the product dry out quick.
     
    imbroke likes this.
  14. 270ci
    Joined: May 17, 2010
    Posts: 366

    270ci
    Member




    Drink more beer!
     
    imbroke likes this.
  15. Looks like you may have two different paint jobs on there. The white top hood and on the bumpers looks like a repaint. That is probably newer acrylic enamel. Maybe the blue part is original or maybe it was repainted once too.

    One thing to tell you: I recently got a Off-Topic hood for a car and it was from a junked car. The paint was single stage repainted black acrylic urethane since these cars all had the infamous Ford "clear coat" failure. So I was trying to shine a dull repaint. First: I clay barred the hood because there was lots of grit and some overspray on the paint (car was sitting outside a body shop I guess, before it got junked) Turtle wax polish didn't do anything for me. No 7 definitely shined it up but made swirls. Can't find no 7 around here, but I got some from Amazon. Then I used Meguiars M105 and then some Black Magic wax. Result was very nice on the area I tested. Almost looked like a fresh paint job, the surrounding areas were/are still hazy and fairly dull. (If it ever quits snowing up here /gets above 32F I'll finish the job.)
     
    imbroke likes this.
  16. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    I wish my wife had your mentality. Then again I’d probably be a mess!


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  17. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    Man I didn’t even think of it that way, but I think your right. The white is really nice, while the blue is oxidized beyond belief.


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  18. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    Man that’s a cool ride. I’m a firm believer a little elbow grease can save a few bucks. I guess I just need to cowboy up and accept this will be a lot of work.


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  19. BENT VALVE
    Joined: May 13, 2013
    Posts: 35

    BENT VALVE
    Member

    Meguiars Ultimate Compound as stated earlier does a good job and is a liquid that goes on smooth. Nice car.
    Bent
     
    imbroke likes this.
  20. yep...nice car and job right there.........
     
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  21. Slopok
    Joined: Jan 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,562

    Slopok
    Member

    The only way you can hurt your car with a Porter Cable random orbit polisher would be to bang it against it. Check out paint detailing by Junkman, very informative information.
     
    imbroke likes this.
  22. imbroke
    Joined: Dec 19, 2014
    Posts: 23

    imbroke

    Thank You!


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  23. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,254

    The37Kid
    Member

    DSCF7767.JPG DSCF7768.JPG Under side of an 80 year old Ford cowl vent with original factory paint. I've always been a fan of Meguiar's products. Bob
     
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  24. Maybe try a variable speed buffer and turn it down slow. Can't see burning through anything like that with a little caution.

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  25. HunterYJ
    Joined: Jul 2, 2010
    Posts: 119

    HunterYJ
    Member
    from Buda Texas

    Lot's of great advice so far. I use the Mequiars professional line too, works great when working by hand and not using a buffer. Dont be in a hurry, it took a while to get that bad and it takes a while to get the shine back.
    Normally, I wash the car at least twice if the car has been neglected. I have used Comet as Oldolds described on many my father flipped in the 70s and 80s, it always worked well as a first wash on the old cars.Then 2 to 3 rounds of gentle rubbing compound. Doing it by hand, you will feel when you have done enough without going too far .Then a couple of coats of glaze/polish and a couple of wax.
    Enjoy the process, it is a good way to get to know your car. :)
     
  26. 1oldtimer
    Joined: Aug 21, 2003
    Posts: 7,491

    1oldtimer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This took about 6 hours WITH the buffer and Meguiars products I stated above. Old lacquer paint, it's still cracking in places but shiny now.
    wax inside-1.jpg
     

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