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Technical Brake Line Source?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by fyrffytr1, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    Hey Y'all, it's me again. I am still working on the brakes for my 50 Pontiac and after attempting to make the lines myself :mad::mad::mad:I have decided to go with the preformed kit. I have looked at Classic Tube, Inline Tube and California Pontiac Restorations. The first two have them for the same price and the third source is about $11.00 more.
    Do any of you know another source that you would recommend or would you go with one of the three mentioned above?
     
  2. dirt t
    Joined: Mar 20, 2007
    Posts: 4,147

    dirt t
    Member
    from Kingman,AZ

    Three vendors within $11.00 dollars ???
     
  3. KoolKat-57
    Joined: Feb 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,602

    KoolKat-57
    Member
    from Dublin, OH

    They're all good quality suppliers!
    KK
     
  4. Slopok
    Joined: Jan 30, 2012
    Posts: 1,941

    Slopok
    Member

    Buy the fuel lines as well no matter who you choose.
     
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  5. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    Two were less than a dollar difference! Just looking for satisfied customers or ones who had problems.
     
  6. The fact that you can GET brake lines for a '50 Pontiac blows my mind. Just make sure they don't fold up the longest lines before they box them up.
     
  7. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,476

    oldolds
    Member

    In reality there is probably only one supplier of that tubing. That is why the price is so close. They will be bent to fit in half (at least) to fit in a reasonable box for shipping. Usually a big loop. I have never seen tight bends for shipping.
     
  8. brake1000
    Joined: Jan 10, 2009
    Posts: 17

    brake1000
    Member
    from ID

    I bought the Classic Tube kit for my 46 Ford, and it was a joke, bought the InLine Tube kit, fit a lot better. been on over a year, no issues.
     
  9. 54 Chevrolet
    Joined: Aug 29, 2018
    Posts: 42

    54 Chevrolet
    Member
    from Wv

    I always make my own lines,buy 50ft rolls 3/16,1/4 tubing and use A good quality double flaring tool,some bending tools.Ive plumbed two cars like that.Its A lot of work,but doesn't cost to much,and I kinda enjoy doing it.
     
  10. I bet it's one supplier.
    I've bought from inline before, great product, project, results.
    Everything came out of the box and damn near j
     
  11. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    Thanks for all the replies. I also posted this on the Pontiac forum I am a member of and had a few negative remarks made about Inline. Classic doesn't offer the fuel line but Inline Tube and California Pontiac Restoration do. CPR has the same part numbers for their lines as does Inline Tube so I am guessing they come from the same supplier. CPR is only about $7.00 higher for the brake and fuel lines than Inline so I think it will come down to shipping charges. I wish they would put a shipping estimator on their web sites like some others do.
     
  12. 54vicky
    Joined: Dec 13, 2011
    Posts: 778

    54vicky
    Member

    what happened to your wanting to do yourself:rolleyes:that did not last too long:D
     
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  13. Rusty Heaps
    Joined: May 19, 2011
    Posts: 419

    Rusty Heaps
    Member

    I've used Inline Tube for many projects and have always had good results
     
    FrankenRodz likes this.
  14. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    I tried but ran out of line(only had 25 feet!) attempting to get a good inverted flare with a not good flaring tool! :mad:I also ruined the brass block on the rear axle when the flare got crimped between the nut and the block threads! Luckily I had another one on the parts car behind the shop.
    I don't know how much a good flaring tool is but since this probably my last or next to last project I figure buying the lines already made up would be the way to go.
     
  15. 54 Chevrolet
    Joined: Aug 29, 2018
    Posts: 42

    54 Chevrolet
    Member
    from Wv

    I bought A double flaring tool at A AutoZone, and it was A piece of junk. I went to school with the guy I bought it from and gave my money back.I got on eBay and bought A vintage imperial double flaring tool for about the same money ,works great and made in USA.
     
  16. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 847

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    I've used Inline many times with no complaints, but on my '49 Styleline I bent my own from straight runs bought at Autozone. There's so much room under there, no need for a custom kit.
     
  17. 54vicky
    Joined: Dec 13, 2011
    Posts: 778

    54vicky
    Member

    now that reality has set in.you can save a lot of agro by buying preflared line using a product called nicopp.google it.you can get it in different lengths using unions for the long front to rear run.
     
  18. coupe man
    Joined: Sep 1, 2007
    Posts: 206

    coupe man
    Member

    That's what I did on my Ply.20 plus years ago.I figured if I screwed up a flare I would only have to replace a short piece of line.Never had any leaks from joining the lines together.
     
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  19. woodiewagon46
    Joined: Mar 14, 2013
    Posts: 1,122

    woodiewagon46
    Member
    from New York

    I may be over simplifying this but purchase a GOOD flaring tool and bender and do it yourself. It's not that hard. I would bet that part of your problem is the flaring tool you are using. Friend of mine had a flaring tool he purchased from Harbor Freight and was making every flair crooked. I lent him my kit and he did great. Imperial Eastman makes a good tool and benders.
     
  20. The price you pay for a good flaring tool and bender is probably about the same as buying all the preformed kits, which probably wont fit as nicely as you think they will. I have done a bunch of them all from all the vendors you talked about, and they all need tweeked. Hell the first thing you have to do is straighten them out after they bent them in half to fit in a shipping box.

    But the right tools and a roll of NicOp brake line and some fittings. It will cost about the same, the lines will last forever and you have the tools to use again for the next project.
     
    FrankenRodz likes this.
  21. Arominus
    Joined: Feb 2, 2011
    Posts: 351

    Arominus
    Member

    Your local hydro line shop should be able to make you some too if you want a higher quality line or coated stainless lines (my choice)

    Edit: oh i thought we were talking about the rubber lines at the end! Yeah get some nicop and the tools you'll be ok.
     
  22. 54vicky
    Joined: Dec 13, 2011
    Posts: 778

    54vicky
    Member

    I think you meant hydraulic NOT hydro;)
     
  23. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

  24. TrailerTrashToo
    Joined: Jun 20, 2018
    Posts: 77

    TrailerTrashToo
    Member

    I am real happy with mine.
     
  25. It might be, but you're not going to be able to use it on anything attached to the car. So that's 1/2 the versatility. I've got a master cool tool that works well but you need 2 people because it takes 4 hands to get it set up, that means it takes twice as long. However that tool also makes all the specialty ends that are off topic so it's worth it is you do that sort of work.

    You just can't beat the old fashioned split bar tool for brake lines. A couple instructions that must be followed with a tool that doesn't suck and you'll have perfect leak free flairs all the time. My old imperial tool was handed down from my dad and has done 1000s of flairs, most of them under the car without assistance of a bench or vice. I'd bet you can count the bad flairs on one hand
     
  26. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    I was given a Blue Point flaring tool yesterday. It is the split bar. I will give it a try. All the lines I am making up are off the car and that is why I considered the Eastwood unit. And, this car and maybe one more, if I don't sell it, willbe it for me. That is why I am also considering buying pre-formed lines.
     
  27. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 610

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    Buy a roll of the nickle copper line, with a good tool it flares easy, won't rust and it forms easy. These steel lines you buy now are not worth a crap.
     
    54vicky likes this.
  28. fyrffytr1
    Joined: Dec 20, 2016
    Posts: 210

    fyrffytr1
    Member

    I ordered a roll of Nicopp line Monday evening and it arrived today. I made one flare this evening before supper and it came out nice even if I say so myself. I hope to get some lines made up this weekend if I have any free time. I'll let Y'all know how I do.
     
  29. The Eastwood bender looks interesting. I borrowed a Master Cool kit when I did mine and it was amazing, a little practice on some old lines was a good idea. There are little tricks that nobody will share... like making sure the tube is cut square, deburred inside and out. And take your time with it. I've seen old timers... now we're the old timers? ... make great lines with those real rudimentary flaring tools.
     
  30. Silverplate
    Joined: Mar 4, 2011
    Posts: 141

    Silverplate
    Member

    I have the Eastwood flaring tool. It's awesome making a perfect flare every time and in about a minute or so. It's a lifesaver and worth ever penny.
     
    bobss396 likes this.

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