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Technical Bondo woes

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 36roadster, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. I didn,t know there was a "brand" called Bondo, we usually get stuff that is imported from Europe somewhere. Generally it's OK. Bondo U.S. = "Bog" Australian
    I have left the panel in the workshop where it got to 100degrees plus for the last couple of days and it seems to have hardened up & sandable by now.
     
  2. I would still remove it. If it took that long to catalyse it did not have the right amount of hardener in it (probably due to the hardener being old and weaker than it should be). Even if it is sandable now if it does not have the right amount of catalyst it may be prone to expanding and shrinking with temperature fluctuations down the road.

    Yes Bondo is a brand name owned by 3M but has kind of become like Xerox has to photocopying a catch all term for body filler.
     
  3. spanners
    Joined: Feb 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,272

    spanners
    Member

    You are probably also aware to every so often 'knead' the tube of hardener so you don't use the runny bit that comes straight out of a new tube. If used, it sometimes causes these sort of problems.
    I once said to a new apprentice panelbeater, "did you knead the hardener?" Yes ,of course I did, he replied.
    " But did you knead it?"
    This went on for some time (okay, I was revving him up).
    Eventually he arcs up, " I might be only new but I know that you need to use hardener".
    I then proceeded to give him an English lesson in the difference between 'knead and need'. I can be a turd sometimes.
    The same apprentice went on to win a few awards during his training.
     
  4. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 18,512

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The term "Bondo" comes from the brand Bondo.

    It is considered a very low grade product, which frequently exhibits symptoms such as you described.

    http://bondo.com/
     
  5. rdemilt
    Joined: Jan 12, 2009
    Posts: 135

    rdemilt
    Member
    from so florida

    K13 - im interested in the filler brand you suggest and the company you work for, I have had some success with evercoat spot putties in very small amounts used over epoxies. I would really like to have something thats easy to work and sand. I curently just mix micro balloons with my resin to make a faring compound but it takes additional time to harden, I'm always looking for a easer way.

    peace,
    Rick
     
  6. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    On the subject of plastic filler? I plan to use only top of the line filler. Someone said Duraglas is good to use? pros - cons?
     
  7. I actually work for Evercoat. Are you looking for a product similar to a putty or something with more body like a filler? You might look at our Quantum products they are quite unique and have some epoxy added to them so should work very well with your epoxy based resins. The also are the only products on the market that have different speed hardeners available (3 speeds). If you have had issues with polyesters drying over epoxies in the past it may be the type of resin you are using. Some or the 1:1 mix epoxies can take days before they fully cure. They may seem cured but they are still releasing certain elements that can have disastrous out comes for polyesters. If you have other questions please send me a message and I will do my best to answer them.

    Duraglass is a reinforced product meaning it has fibreglass strands added to polyester resin. The pro's of that type of product is it has added strength because the strands help bridge and hold the resin together the cons are they are not very easy to work with or sand and they will still need to have another product added over top to finish them. If your metal work is done to a decent level they should not be needed. I know some guys will use them over weld seams for added strength but if you finish your seams properly they should not be required. If your metal work is close a good quality filler or putty should be all you need. If you are working on fiberglass parts they work well because they are a similar make up to the existing part. Again if you need any more info please let me know.
     
  8. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 18,512

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    K13, give the higher-ups a big thumbs-up from me.

    Made me a fat stack of cash with Evercoat products.
     
  9. ol'stinky
    Joined: Oct 3, 2010
    Posts: 357

    ol'stinky
    Member
    from New Jersey

    Ever since 3M bought them out it actually not bad. I'm using it on some non automotive projects right now and it seems really similar to the stuff I use everyday in the body shop. Who knows how it holds up over time, but it sands decent.
     
  10. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 18,512

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'll take your word for it.
     

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