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Technical BODY, TECH Bondo 101 (Magic dent erasing compound)

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by overspray, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    OK--Here's the gospel on body filler/bondo over primer. I used to work as a technical/sales rep for the company that makes rage filler. I know the guys (chemists) that developed the resin for rage filler. I've been a bodyman/painter,sales rep and technical rep for 30 years. The resin in rage and other body fillers is fiberglass (polyester) resin. Today's resin technology makes the adhesion of these new resins as good or better than most epoxy adhesives (glue). They are designed to really stick! Also they are somewhat flexible when used properly. Most or probably all filler manufacturers design and reccommend them to be used over clean and prepped (grinding with course-36 grit) and rust free (sandblasted)and dry (free from moisture) BARE metal. They will stick to epoxy primers with mechanical adhesion-they DO NOT chemically bond with epoxies. If you put filler over epoxy primer it has to be fully cured with no solvents (thinner-reducer) left in the primer and still should be sanded with a course grit and cleaned. In other words- It's a wasted step that may or may not cause adhesion problems later on. Most critical is to be clean and moisture free. Body filler resin is a thermal set plastic-it cures with heat. The hardner-MEK peroxide is a catalyst that produces heat in the resin. It needs to be at 64 degrees F minimum to cure-best is 72-80 degreesF. (If you live in a warm climate still read on but it may not apply to you.) If the metal is cold the filler will cure from the outside in and could trap some moisture and solvent from the resin underneath-causing adhesion or bubbling problems later. (Styrene is the solvent in resin and produces the smell/odor we associate with bondo and fillers). Also moisture (humidity in the air) will condense on the surface of the cold metal. This is the same effect you get when the mirror in the bathroom fogs up when you shower. (I hope you all shower). The mirror and the metal of the car are about 10-15 degrees cooler than the air temperature and the humidity condenses on them. If you warm the mirror or the car metal to about the air temperature, the moisture won't condense on the surface. Using a heat source to warm (NOT HOT) the panel will eliminate the moisture being trapped under the filler (which can show up as rust under the filler) and help keep the cure temperature even through the filler. This is the way the chemists designed the product to work. You can use extra catalyst to speed the cure, but too much will cause too much heat in the reaction and crystalize the resin which causes it to be brittle and break down (yup-more problems later). If you head to the autobody supply store for more hardner you may be using too much and looking at problems down the road. PreWARMING the metal and keepin the shop warm will let it cure more evenly with the correct amount of hardner. Heat lamps or lights should be far enough away so the panel feels warm when you put your bare hand on it (NOT HOT). The correct amount of hardner is 1 1/2 to 3%. Here's an easy way to figure it. On the pallet or board you mix your bondo or filler on put the amount you are going to mix up in the form of a circle. With your spreader or mixer divide the circle in half-50%. Divide the half in half-25%-half again-12.5%-half again-6.25% half again-3.125% (this is the maximum) half again-1.5% (this is the minimum). If you have a COLD shop put a small batch on a WARMED test panel to check the cure time-spread to about 1/4 inch thick. It should be fully cured in about 30 minutes to 1 hour depending on the temperature and hardner amount. (Yup, I know you can add a pile of hardner and get it to "kick" in a few minutes). A good cure time lets the gasses come out and gives ample time to work out the air pockets with the spreader. (eliminate "pinholes") After a few times you'll be able to gauge the amount of hardner for the size of the filler batch you are mixing. There is some room here for a little extra-but not a lot of extra hardner. REMEMBER, this needs to work with the temperature of the air and metal. Filler also contains talc (the mineral in talcum powder) which will absorb moisture. If you try to fill holes in a body panel, moisture can be absorbed from the back side and cause the area to swell and bubble. Also bare filler left in the weather (rain) for any length of time can absorb moisture and cause problems later. It will cost a lot less to follow these steps of correctly preparing the metal and working with the correct temperature range and hardner amounts than to even bother with epoxy primer as an underlayer. Between coats of filler DO NOT wipe with solvent (thinner).(Solvent will absorb into the filler). Rough up the areas not sanded and blow the dust off real good then apply a new layer. Thickness of the layers should not be more than 1/4-3/8 inch. If you put filler on too thick the heat in the reaction will be concentrated and higher in the thick area and could lead to crystalizing the resin in that spot making it brittle and subject to cracking later. Also too thick can mean you won't be able to get all the air pockets smoothed out. Use a primer surfacer system that is reccommended for the paint you will use. Self etching primers usually contain an acid and should not be used under filler ( the acid will slow down the cure of the filler resin). I like these primers for bare metal on my projects. I use them but grind them off where I do filler work. Also the acid in the self etching primer activator will affect the epoxy resin hardners in epoxy primers where they may not cure chemically but will still air dry. It is possible to put epoxy primer over self etching primer BUT ONLY if the acid is gone and the etch primer is fully cured. (probably a wasted step anyway). My preference is etch primer on bare sandblasted metal (I'm talking old cars here) bondo or filler on bare metal, a catalized spot or glazing putty (bondo skim coat), a good 2 part urethane primer filler and a good topcoat finish. Yup, I know how to make paint look like primer (suede). Now one more thing to screw up your minds-- today's bondo/body filler technology will adhere to properly cured paint and primers if they are absolutely clean and dry. They stick by mechanical adhesion- they grip to scratches-the rougher the surface the better the grip. Solvents (thinners and reducers) in paints and primers can work under the edges of the bondo/body filler area-and it's easier for this to happen if you have paint or primer under the bondo/body filler. Even when priming over filler on bare metal don't put so much on that you have the solvent affect or "lift " the edge of the filler. Use nice even coats and let the solvents "flash" (evaporate) between coats of primer. overspray
     
  2. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 9,489

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    Overspray, Thanks for the post ! Great information.
    I felt like I was read the Good Book with no indents or itemized portions. [​IMG] I plan to copy this for future use. thanks !
     
  3. Deyomatic
    Joined: Apr 17, 2002
    Posts: 3,095

    Deyomatic
    Member
    from CT

    YOU READ MY FUCKING MIND. I honestly JUST looked through Tech-O-Matic to see if there was a Bondo thread already. I'm in the process of TRYING to make the spots I just filled look like they were never there and I'm failing miserably.
    Thanks.
     
  4. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    If you are beginning-do some test batches first. If what you put on the car doesn't look like it's "right"-grind it off and start over. Bondo is the least expensive part of body work. It doesn't work to keep going over a bad mix. It all takes time to learn technique. I've worked with guys that made Michaelangelo look like a "rookie" when it comes to sculpting. It usually takes me longer to get the shaping the way I want it- but I do okay. I'm glad I helped. overspray
     
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  5. Nads
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 11,507

    Nads
    Member
    from Hypocrisy

    Great tips, but man was it hard to read.
    Anyways, what about catalyzed glazing putty?
    Can it be put over a surface sanded to 320 grit without problems or not?
    Is that too smooth a surface?
     
  6. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    CATALIZED GLAZING PUTTY-- is basically a finer textured bondo. It has less pourous filler material added to the mix so it doesn't absorb solvents AS MUCH. A rougher scratch than 320 grit would be better, but that will work. The key to using this stuff or any catalized primer filler or spot putty with a hardner is to remember if you put it over a finish (paint or primer) that does not have a hardner, solvent or thinner will soak into the UN-CATALIZED product and not the CATALIZED product. The UN-CATALIZED product will swell a little from the solvent it absorbed and later (usually after you have painted the car) it will evaporate and shrink back down leaving sand scratches or a ring around the area. It's best to use a system with products that are 2-part (catalized) with hardner from the metal work to the finish. There so many good fillers, primers, glazes, and paints that are 2-part systems today. Back in the day of lacquer paint finishes on customs, painters would color sand the paint after it dried and repaint to get all the sand scratch shrinkage out. This process was repeated until the paint didn't show the sanding marks. They used to say- "This car has 20 coats of hand rubbed lacquer." "Hand-rubbed" was the term in some areas for color sanding by hand. The thinner in the paint was stronger (slower evaporating) than the thinner used in the primer. When you painted lacquer paint, the thinner would soak into the primer and cause it to shrink back into the scratches in the body work. That is why the process was repeated until scratches didn't show in the final coat. Sorry about all the text, Nads, but I thought this would be good companion information to the post. I'll add some more related info later. overspray
     
  7. Judd
    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 1,894

    Judd
    Member

    Overspray
    Thanks! Great post and right on time for me I'm in the act of sand blasting now. can the bondo be thicker if it is done in several coats and allowed to dry in between? I have a spot on my 56 that is cracked and it looks like a dent was covered with about 1/8th" of bondo can I cut this out with 80 grit on my grinder, finish with 80 grit on my DA sander and redo with a couple coats of bondo or will it need to be hamered out? Thanks!
    Judd
     
  8. timebandit
    Joined: Feb 13, 2003
    Posts: 188

    timebandit
    Member
    from Norway

    Great post. I have one question about using filler on bare metal though. I know most bodymen does it that way but i have allways been a little skeptic about that. I thought rust preventing primer will not have a mission on top of filler.
    It has to have contact with bare metal to do its job.
    I can see that you will get a long lasting paint job if the metal is absolutely rust free and dry. But can you always be sure of that? The tinest crack in a seam or small pores in a weld can leak in moisture eventually.And then you need the chemicals in the primer to prevent rust. Does modern fillers have those chemical qualities?

    I live in a cold salty climate , so rust is always the biggest problem here. [​IMG]
     
  9. Best information I've ever seen on the subject. Thanks Overspray. You guys that are trying to learn filler, should print this out and study it till you can recite it.

     
  10. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    Judd, 1/8 inch is usually no problem for filling. I've seen some really thick sculpting in my day. Building up an area in layers of 1/4 to 3/8 inch will work. The thicker the filler the more chance you can have problems down the road. I have seen jobs over 2 inches thick last for years and some of the old custom jobs were done even thicker. If you have a crack in the metal under the filler, that will have to be welded first. Any place under the filler that can move will show up later. Body filler will have the ability to flex some, but a crack in the panel will eventually crack the bondo. Grinding with 80 grit will work-coarser (36 grit) is OK. Remove all of the old filler and start over using the process I described. If you have trouble getting areas ground out, use a wire brush in a drill or even a broken 1/8 inch drill bit will get into tight areas to grind to bare metal. overspray
     
  11. Nads
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 11,507

    Nads
    Member
    from Hypocrisy

    overspray, I've learned a bunch from you, junior member.
    With all the extensive body mods I've done on my '54 Chevy I should've gone heavy on the filler in the first place. It seems you're right about roughing in the bodywork with 36 grit followed by 80, anything finer does nothing to straighten out the panels. Most of the crap gets sanded off anyway.
    I'm following your advice now, although I'm not bondoing on bare metal, it's too late for that. But I am going over catalyzed primer, Nason brand. Everything's coming along really good and I feel like I'm making some real progress, but the goal of having my car painted still seems a ways off.

    Every small step is a step in the right direction.

    Thanks for your advice.
     

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  12. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    timebandit-preventing rust (or moisture) from forming under the bondo/body filler repair is a big concern. In humid and cool conditions I don't like to start exposing (grinding) the panel bare until I'm ready to do the filler work and can complete the area to the priming stage. If I have bare (rusty old car) metal I sandblast and grind just prior to doing the body filler work. Keeping the panel warm will keep moisture from forming on the surface and help keep the curing process of the filler even. Temperature is the most critical factor when working in cool humid conditions. There are 2 basic primers to protect from rust. Rust inhibiting primers seal the area from moisture but DO NOT chemically react with the rust. Etch primers contain an acid (usually phosphoric acid) and chemically etch the metal (the acid converts the Iron-oxide (rust) to Iron phosphate) and the filler part of the etch primer seals out the moisture. Phosphoric acid slows down the catalyst (hardner) in the bondo/body filler and can make it not cure properly. Todays body filler/bondo technology basically does the same job on bare metal that a rust inhibiting primer would do. It bonds tight against the surface of the metal ( with mechanical adhesion) to seal out air and moisture. Actually the technology in the bondo/body filler products we use in the U.S. came from Europe so you have had them for about 8-10 years longer than we have. There are no chemical reactions with the body filler (polyester resin) and rust. You could still prime over a small layer of rust, put bondo/body filler over it and end up with problems later. As I said in my original post I use etching primer on bare sandblasted metal but I grind it off in the area I do my filler work. I try to keep the area warmed, clean and dry. By the way, my Grandparents came from Norway. They were lumberjacks and farmers. Maybe we are shirttail cousins. overspray
     
  13. Overspray.. I was once told not to mix filler on cardboard. Don't remember why. Is it bad to mix on cardboard? I use a peice of lexan and clean it with a razor blade before it kicks.
    Clark
     
  14. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    So What-The reason you shouldn't use cardboard is- you don't know where that cardboard has been. Really I use a product called "clean sheets" which is a palet with a tablet of nonporous paper sheets that I can tear off and throw away when I'm done. Most cardboard is porous and will absorb some of the solvent in the resin (styrene) but most of all the styrene will let loose any chemical that was already in the cardboard- like if it was a box that held oil, grease, or worse SILICONE!! (armorall) I saw a guy mix filler on an Armorall box once. When he went to sand it with an air board sander it peeled right off. Not to mention he and everyone else in the shop had "fisheye" problems for about 3 days. I still use cardboard if I have to, but Lexan, plexiglass, or an old car door glass is way better. I hope I'm getting smarter in my old age. Like Nads said- I'm a junior member. (Where did all this gray hair come from??? Must be---overspray)
     
  15. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    Great post, Overspray- learning about body filler and primer is quite a class in Situational Chemistry; it seems to depend what it is yer working with, and/or what order you've done things in. That said:
    Been prepping my truck since Fall '02, sanded everything down to bare metal with 60 grit, aircraft stripper for the rest, the brunt of the filler work on the cab 'n front fenders happened over summer, the climate was perfect, it worked out well.
    Had to give the garage back to the friend, project's been tarped with baths of metal etch every other day since. Just trying to get everything clear for etching & filler primer, but what an uphill battle (otherwise it'd be primered by now, o'course). Simply don't have indoors for it, right now.
    I don't have any primer 'neath the filler, it's either bare metal, bondo and Loctite rust neutralizer, on the surface, respectively.
    When a helping hand covered the filler areas, too, with Loctite, it made me wonder if this would 'hurt' the bondo (it's way past the curing stage, though.
    Quick question, too, about:
    [ QUOTE ]
    Todays body filler/bondo technology basically does the same job on bare metal that a rust inhibiting primer would do. It bonds tight against the surface of the metal ( with mechanical adhesion) to seal out air and moisture.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Does this mean a lowered chance of new rust having cropped 'neath in, in all this time?
    The metal was in excellent conditions when the filler was applied, and have done so much surface/deep rust removal from the bare metal, sometimes worry about what's going on with the metal 'neath the Bondo.
    There's so much filler work done, re-doing it doesn't seem like an option. Am covering the cab with etching & filler primer. Just wondered if I was on the right track. Thanks for yer time, man.
     
  16. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    Humboldt Cat-sounds like you're on the right track. It's not the best situation to leave the body and filler areas bare for so long, but with projects it is sometimes the only way. You California people have it lots better temperature and humidity wise than the Norwegians and us NoDaks. There are 2 basic self etching primers. Vinyl-wash primer is a thin, vinyl-resin based primer with a phosphoric acid activator/reducer. It is translucent and mostly used for bare metal only (not over filler/bondo) and is usually primed and painted very soon after it is applied (wet on wet). The other etch primers are milder, acid wise, and have some filling ability and are OK to use over cured filler-followed by a good primer filler/surfacer, usually wet on wet also. Check with the manufacturer on times and which systems (primers) to use. If your project has been "bare" in humid conditions, there is a good possibility of a rust film forming on the exposed metal. A scuffing and cleaning followed by the milder etch primer would be my choice. Unless you have a real wet climate, the area under the filler should be OK. I would suggest letting the body be warm and dry for a few days before priming to help let any moisture that may have absorbed into the bare filler areas evaporate. Most primers have some alcohol in the solvents which will help draw some moisture out. overspray
     
  17. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    I gotta say some more on etching primers. They chemically grip to the metal by converting the oxidation (rust). They also do this on aluminum and help in getting the best adhesion on stainless steel also. Metal prep/ metal conditioner uses the same acids to neutralize the rust. You CAN have an adhesion problem if you use metal prep followed real soon with an etching primer. The etch primer won't have enough rust (it doesn't take much) to bond with and will not stick. I have seen this happen. I prefer to sandblast the metal then use etching primer (I'm talking old cars here). It's a lot less messy than using metal prep and you get a good chemical and mechanical bond. Follow this with a good quality 2 part primer filler and you have a great foundation for your topcoat finish (SUEDE or SHINEY). overspray
     
  18. YoungGun50chevy
    Joined: Dec 4, 2003
    Posts: 29

    YoungGun50chevy
    Member

    I have question about bondo that has always plagued me. How much working time are you supposed to have? I've made batches up that were the right mixture by the cans directions, and before I could get it spread out, it started to harden. I havn't had a chance to try your mixing method but I'm still curious about this problem since I usually get comments about not putting enough hardner in from experienced people. For the record, most (all) of my bondo experience is in florida during the summer, so keep that in mind. ALso, how could I extend the working time? less hardner? How much less? I'd love to have enough time to skim coat a door without worrying about it hardening half way through.
     
  19. SwitchBlade327
    Joined: Dec 15, 2002
    Posts: 2,911

    SwitchBlade327
    Member

    In florida in the summer time, it won't take much hardener. If it's hot out, use less, if it's cold use more. I did the same thing the first summer I used the stuff.
     
  20. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    YoungGun50Chevy--Switchblade327 is right, but you can put too little hardner in the mix and it won't have enough to full cure the whole mix. Temperature is the KEY. If it's 90 degrees F out or hotter you will probably have to do the work in the shade and work on smaller areas in order to keep up with the fast cure. You can only slow it down so much or speed it up so much, it has a limit on each end. If you ruin a batch-throw it away! It's cheap stuff compared to ruining a paint job down the road. One thing I noticed the 1 time I was in Florida---the body shops had HUGE airconditioners. We only have HUGE heaters up here in North Dakota. I'm sure it's common where you guys live to have an airconditioner even in your home workshop. The temperature is directly proportional to the amount of hardner and it just takes time to get it "dialed" in. Also ALWAYS mix the batch as thouroughly as possible!!! Not so many years ago our neighbors in Canada used clear liquid hardner for thier bondo/body filler. That is really a pain to use when you can't see the color change like with the creme hardner we use in the States. overspray
     
  21. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    I keep seeking out this tech post, it's been so damn helpful.
    [ QUOTE ]
    You CAN have an adhesion problem if you use metal prep followed real soon with an etching primer. The etch primer won't have enough rust (it doesn't take much) to bond with and will not stick. I have seen this happen.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Wish I'd read this before etch primering, today. The Loctite rust neutralizer 'cured' well, no surface rust patches in it. To be on the safe side, I wiped the rig down with metal etch before primering. I didn't have a lot time to work with, today, especially after the electric air compressor I was renting was causing the fuse switches in the condo to pop shut (the worst was when it happened with the garage, affecting ALL condo garages connected to it).
    Switched with a gas powered air comp and the etching worked well. Didn't have time to put the filler on, but will finish up the etching and then filler tomorrow.
    Thanks for all your info and help, Overspray! Hopefully I did it right, today.
     
  22. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    Afterthought- I know my reply wasn't so much about Bondo itself, but you've help clear up alot of question marks about the type of primers I'm using, in conjunction with the filler, and, hell- bodywork history. It feels like a big push forward, though. Viva la HAMB for posts like this.
    I'll have pictures soon- got so much help from Polly's teen boys, Luke in particular had fun taking photos of the whole thing happening. What a trip. Thanks again.
     
  23. TomH
    Joined: Oct 21, 2003
    Posts: 1,250

    TomH
    Member

    Hey Overspray, I was going to bing up your old post, but this is working out much better. Lucky for me your only a phone call away. Oh yea that aint overspray, it's GRAY HAIR [​IMG]
     
  24. Plowboy
    Joined: Nov 8, 2002
    Posts: 4,246

    Plowboy
    Member

    Overspray, since this got back to the front and you worked with the evercoat people, what is the difference between Rage, Lite, Z-grip and any of the other evercoat fillers? Is there a specific use for each one?

    Should you mix them (by this I mean layer)? I figure if you are using layers of different stuff there will be different layers of hardness making it a real bitch to sand anything out level.
     
  25. overspray
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,226

    overspray
    Member

    Plowboy--rage is a top of the line filler ( my personal choice) Z-grip was introduced to stick to galvanized panels (80's and 90's Ford pickup cowls for instance). The lite weight filler was a price leader-still good stuff. Mostly it is pretty much what you like and how you percieve it works for you (personal preference). I like rage filler and metal-glaze liquid glaze putty. Most filler companies have good products but things have really improved in the last 15 years. The resin in rage was a major accomplishment in the technology of adhesion and workability. A big part of the development was due to base-clear paint. You basically double the amount of solvent you put on a paint job from old single stage paints. With the older fillers and primers all that extra solvent would cause the filler areas to leave a stain-like area that would show up in the paint. Some changes were made and new products evolved. All the old guys who worked with bondo 30 years ago will agree it's really nice to have the products that are available today. Some of the old body fillers were like sanding an Interstate Highway. Still the major factor in body work is 2 part primers and finishes. They cut the work/dry time down drastically and give us 20 times the durability and way better appearance. I hope some of you reading this post add a few pictures of your work (I'm still learning the photo thing). Nads has some real nice work in progress pictures (I see major artistic talent there) and I'd like to see more from some others --60's style--Humbolt cat-- to the digicam. Tomorrow I'll post some more primer info that should compliment the information here already. overspray
     
  26. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    [ QUOTE ]
    and I'd like to see more from some others --60's style--Humbolt cat-- to the digicam.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I dig it, it's like the Bat Call for the Bondo Brigade, or somethin'. I'll have some pics for you when I get home from Work...
     
  27. Paul
    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 13,989

    Paul
    Editor

    this is a great post, this stuff is what makes the HAMB such a great place!

    so uh..here's where I'm at,

    I sand blasted the body inside and out and used DP90 on the outside and POR15 on the in and under sides.

    'threw it all together and drove it for a year or so.

    I started the bondo a month or so ago with the intent of driving it this summer with real paint on it.

    to add to all the great info already is tough,

    one thing I would say is lighting is very important, especially if you work inside.

    for large areas I set up a work light so that the light shines across the surface highlighting all the high and low areas.

    I work in thin layers slowly working towards the finish shape as oposed to laying it on heavy and carving it down to shape. just seams to work for me.

    I have found that when I do pile it on if I wait till it's good and hard it shapes very nicely with a wood rasp, it would be good to have a few with various shapes and sizes.

    It's also important to be able to stand back from your work to actually see it, if you have a small shop roll it outside once in a while.

    daylight can also reveil stuff you can't see inside.

    anyway here's a couple snaps,

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Paul


     
  28. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    Thanks, '60s, ya helped me figure out where to start with this (but not go too long on it). I haven't figured out how to string multi pics in one reply...
    After sanding off all the old primer, paint and LOTS of bondo, and celebrating no signs of rust or rust holes underneath, I began putting filler back in, focussed first on the doors, the bulk of the filler work done in a friend's garage between January and August of last year.
     

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  29. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    Took me forever not only to finish this fender, but figure out the finesse of good mixes and no pinholes. This is before I discovered red hardner, which works better for me. Meanwhile I POR-15'ed everything beforehand. This is from Feb. '03
     

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  30. Humboldt Cat
    Joined: Feb 20, 2003
    Posts: 2,181

    Humboldt Cat
    Member
    from Eureka, CA

    Closer one... Last Summer...
     

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