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Technical BODY, How to save a roadster door

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by the-rodster, Oct 17, 2004.

  1. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    OK, I'm a cheap bastard. I bought a 28 RPU for $300. Well you can imagine, it's VERY rough. Some patch panels are pretty cheap from brookeville, but doors aint one of them, Soooo, let's fix 'em with homemade patch panels.

    Let's start with the passenger door (practice). No matter how rough the pictures look, it's worse.
     

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  2. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Here's the backside.
     

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  3. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    The bottom two inches are toast.
     

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  4. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    I determined that I need to replace pretty much the entire front of the door, except the top two inches. I'll scribe a line and make the cut.
     

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  5. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    After the cutoff wheel...
     

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  6. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    And I'm gonna replace the bottom two inches of the inner door... scribe the line...
     

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  7. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Whack it off.
     

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  8. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Now let's sandblast it to see what we have to work with.
     

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  9. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Let's start fabbing the bottom of the inner door. I'm using 20 gage so it will be easier to work, and with all the bends, it will be plenty strong. I marked where the bead will need to be formed for the new panel.
     

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  10. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Mark the bead, use the cutoff piece as a template.
     

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  11. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    I borrowed a bead roller from a friend and loaded it with a set of large flange dies.
     

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  12. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
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    With my wife crankin' the arm, I fed the panel through slowly, and it turned out pretty nice.
     

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  13. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Close up of flange...
     

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  14. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
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    I then used a brake to make the bottom bend on the panel.
     

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  15. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Next, cut out the corners.
     

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  16. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Now the edges need to be turned down, I grabbed a chunk of steel the desired size, loaded it in the vise, and proceded to beat the edges of the panel over it.
     

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  17. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
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    Hey, that's more like it!
     

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  18. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    For the long edge, I placed the panel in a vise between a couple of pieces of steel and "broke" it by hand.
     

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  19. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    This is starting to look half way decent. But the panel lacks the slight curve of the door.
     

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  20. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    High tech way of getting the proper curve in the panel.
     

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  21. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    See, it worked.
     

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  22. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
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    Next, tack weld it every inch or so.
     

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  23. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
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    Then weld it solid.
     

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  24. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    And grind the weld.
     

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  25. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Now we can tackle the front of the door. I'm using 18 gage on the front, and started by laying a piece out on the front.
     

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  26. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    After marking the edges, I bent the bottom slightly, then bent it back (I thought that this might help bend it later, and I couldn't leave the bend in when I loaded it in the brake) Then I bent both sides at a 90 degree. I also cut out the recess for the hinge and did a test fit.
     

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  27. Dirty2
    Joined: Jun 13, 2004
    Posts: 8,903

    Dirty2
    Member

    Great post !!!! Now can I send you my doors? [​IMG]
     
  28. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Once all three side are bent, it's time to put the curves in. The panel is a compound curve, bending both vertically and horizontally, by shrinking the edges in the shrinker, the gradual curve can be established. I was surprised at how little effort needs to be applied to make the curve.
     

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  29. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    After some trial and error, and test fitting, the panel is fitting pretty well.
     

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  30. the-rodster
    Joined: Jul 2, 2003
    Posts: 6,727

    the-rodster
    Member

    Since we are about to join the two halves for another 75 years, I shot the inside of both pieces with some primer.
     

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