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Technical Best wood to use for shift and dash knobs? What type of structural wood did early manufactures use?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by no55mad, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. no55mad
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 1,859

    no55mad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Anybody out there with experience in carving/whittling wood for such mentioned knobs? Tried using some different woods but had some problems with swelling as humidity changes.
     
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  2. greybeard360
    Joined: Feb 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,511

    greybeard360
    Member

    Has to be a hard wood, and seal it! Oak, maple, walnut, mahogany,... All good looking and hard, easy to get.

    Sent from my Moto G Play using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  3. Belligerence
    Joined: Jan 7, 2018
    Posts: 29

    Belligerence

    I’ve got a lathe and a whole lotta wood, just throwin it out there


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,634

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    See if you have a supplier of exotic hardwoods in your area. If you do, you might be able to get drop, or samples, that you can make knobs from, without having to buy a large quantity.

    There are some remarkable woods out there.
     
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  5. Deuces
    Joined: Nov 3, 2009
    Posts: 18,705

    Deuces
    Member
    from Michigan

  6. rudestude
    Joined: Mar 23, 2016
    Posts: 2,508

    rudestude
    Member

    If your concerned with moisture problems then teak would be the one to use ...it's oily and easy to shape ...it's used in the finest sail and motor yachts

    Sent from my QTASUN1 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  7. Stueeee
    Joined: Oct 21, 2015
    Posts: 231

    Stueeee
    Member
    from Kent, UK

    The structural wood used by early car manufacturers (in Europe anyway) was Ash. This was used for body framing and even chassis members on some very early cars. Ash is relatively light and springy (by hardwood standards) but is inclined to rot where there's any damp.
     
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  8. chevyfordman
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 846

    chevyfordman
    Member

    rock hard maple
     
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  9. any of the hard woods will be good for the shift knobs, just seal them when done. i carved these salad tongs out of apple from a branch i pruned off the tree.
    2012-10-18 07.10.06.jpg
     
  10. the old car manufacturers used white oak and ash. i used ash to repair the wood in my coupe. 1552386-727ed46046225336fd4b5bf701af754d.jpg
     
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  11. I'm working on a laminated cherry and curly maple shifter knob, will have switches built into it for lights and turn signals. (long story) One can buy exotic hardwood turning stock relatively cheap on Ebay.
    My Autocar COE had white oak for the cab framework. Heavy, heavy, heavy!
     
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  12. GTS225
    Joined: Jul 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,173

    GTS225
    Member

    I understand Mesquite is a good looking wood, too, and I'd someday like to stumble across a piece big enough to carve a stock for a .22 rifle I have.
    And as Greybeard360 said, you've got to seal it up well.

    Roger
     
  13. When I was doing antique furniture restorations I loved the look of Tiger Maple wood.
    tiger maple.jpg
     
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  14. no55mad
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 1,859

    no55mad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Great reply's, thanks. Helped a buddy work on a blind back Model A and the original structural wood in that jalopy was really really hard. Didn't Henry locate his Michigan operation where there was an abundance of wood/forests? Maybe that was ash or white oak? Was going to try some Cal Manzanita (sp ?); super hard but it's hard to find large diameter pieces.
     
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  15. This book is a lot of help.
    cce.jpg
     
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  16. Don't know where you'd get it, but grenadilla from Africa is super-hard. It's what woodwind instruments like clarinets and oboes are made from. It's hard enough to be machined like steel.
     
  17. the choice to use ash, or white oak, is not only that they are hard, and dense enough that they resist absorbing water but there ability to absorb shock or impact. it is why they are used for axe/sledge handles and other tools. construction trailers are decked with them around here. tough enough for a metal cleat, tough enough to handle the weight.
     
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  18. I can bring my other avocation into play on this one. Northern white ash has been the mainstay of bats made by "Louisville Slugger" for Major League Baseball and other leagues for over a century. Mainly due to a dwindling supply of that particular ash, maple bats have crept into the sport in recent years. You can apply what tb33anda3rd said above as reasoning for using these woods in the sport. Also, as mentioned before, teak is a good-looking, hard wood that is weather resistant. Since you're located on the West Coast, I wud think that teak wud be quite available to you.
     
  19. [​IMG]
    I believe oak from the lumber yard properly varnished should look great.
    Here's my Studebaker dash I made over 20yrs ago to cover a cut up dash.
    Lumber yard oak board, milled to a taper, then urethane varnished.
    Still looks like new, a little dusty tho..
    I should have cleaned my work truck for pictures.
    Please ignore my wiper wires. I'm replacing a worn switch :)
    To prevent my stereo from overheating from engine compartment heat, I made a folded-and-crimped sheetmetal box to cover the radio, and then vent the box with cabin air. No overheated radio, no engine smells.

    WHY BE ORDINARY ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
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  20. RmK57
    Joined: Dec 31, 2008
    Posts: 1,591

    RmK57
    Member

    We used to use a type of Ironwood, it comes from Africa. We would use in between the frame and packer on our garbage trucks so there is no metal on metal wear. It would last 10-12 years, the life of the truck. Had to use the metal band saw to cut it and two people to lift a 4x6x12 plank. Amazing stuff.
    Probably overkill for your shift knob though.
     
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  21. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 7,605

    5window
    Member

    My favorite, and one I considered for my dash before choosing curly cherry, would be cocobolo. Keep in mind, though, that is toxic to work with, Another cool shift knob would be one turned out of Fordite. Hard to find a pice big enough, usually.
     
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  22. dreracecar
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 3,053

    dreracecar
    Member
    from so-cal

    Eisenbrand Hardwood in Torrance Ca. 1-800-258-2587
    they have some of the most exotic woods available
     
  23. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,256

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    There’s a local shop, Hardwood Connection, Sycamore IL, that has or can get any wood you can imagine. Priced accordingly, of course. Just browsing their cut offs can be an entertaining afternoon.


    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
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  24. chryslerfan55 likes this.
  25. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,243

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    Empi (? Spelling ) I used some to build seats on an M35 I used to own . It is tuff stuff


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  26. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,243

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    IMPI Teak


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  27. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,243

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    I’m sorry I’ll try this again IPE pronounced ( ee pay )


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  28. simpsonrl
    Joined: Aug 31, 2017
    Posts: 79

    simpsonrl

    You might try yew wood. It is plentiful on the west coast, has brownish to reddish color, has some natural oils and looks nice when sanded smooth. My dad and I for the interior of a boat with it. It looked very nice and all we did was sand it and oil it.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  29. canning
    Joined: Jan 22, 2012
    Posts: 70

    canning
    Member

    If dogwood is dry and stable, you can turn it to make small knobs. Used as wear blocks and idlers for chains. Hard stuff. Boxwood is another good one.
     
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  30. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,092

    bct
    Member

    ebony is natures plastic
     
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