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best way to remove paint from chrome?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Chris, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. commercial grade stripper will not effect chrome....have at it....
     
  2. choppedsled
    Joined: Jun 2, 2007
    Posts: 301

    choppedsled
    Member
    from Spokane WA

    Chris, I've got a slug of reducers / solvents to try if ya want some... free. Just a rag as mentioned above and most likely lacquer thinner, NO steel wool.
     
  3. ChromePlaterJosh
    Joined: Feb 15, 2009
    Posts: 667

    ChromePlaterJosh
    Member

    To answer the original question, use any purpose made paint stripper. It won't touch the chrome and is neutralized by water. It works really well if you leave a thick coat over the part, and cover it all in wax paper to prevent evaporation. Let it sit as long as it needs to. Don't use anything abrasive, especially steel wool of any grade.




    I am a plater, and your info is messed up.

    Chrome is slang for Chromium. It is a an element on the periodic table. It is a dense heavy metal, and not clear at all, even when plated thin in decorative chrome plating. Chromic Acid is not clear at all either. It actually causes a visable tint in water down to parts per million.

    It is correct decorative chrome plating protects the underlying nickel from corroding; nickel does not rust, but it does corrode by dulling and eventually pitting. With maintenance, exposed nickel is still a viable topcoat plating and was the standard up until chrome plating was perfected in the 20's.

    Triple plating refers to the 3 basic layers of plating to achieve a high quality plating. It is typically referring to copper, nickel, then chrome. There are unlimeted variations with many having more than 3 layers, but chrome is never plated onto itself in decorative applications.

    But yes, the decorative chromium plate is extremely thin and should have no abrasives applied to it.
     
  4. slammed
    Joined: Jun 10, 2004
    Posts: 8,151

    slammed
    Member

    Yes. Sanding by hand or sandblasting the part. Use an etching primer to help the primers and top coat bond to surface.
     
  5. Jims Classics
    Joined: Dec 17, 2011
    Posts: 191

    Jims Classics
    Member

    .0000 brass wool and laquer thinner
     
  6. morac41
    Joined: Jul 23, 2011
    Posts: 532

    morac41
    Member

    Hi Chromeplaterjosh....Thanks for clearing up the process of plating ..
     
  7. 327-365hp
    Joined: Feb 5, 2006
    Posts: 5,418

    327-365hp
    Member
    from Mass

    That's what what worries me. If the chrome is scratched up under the paint, you'll just have to repaint it I guess. My brother's 3 window dash is chromed with the recesses painted, would be awesome if it was all chrome!!
    Good luck with yours Chris!
     
  8. SmoKerch
    Joined: May 23, 2011
    Posts: 123

    SmoKerch
    Member

    I used to know a girl who could..., ah, no... wait...

    ...that was chrome off a bumper hitch.


    Sorry, I had that all backwards.
     
  9. 4psi
    Joined: Nov 30, 2011
    Posts: 283

    4psi
    Member

    Methylene Chloride (phenol)...Definatly use supplied air.

    Dekote.... Use respirator.

    Both chemical stripers will work like magic. I don't know where you would buy Methylene Chloride because it is pretty nasty stuff, but you can buy Dekote online.
    http://www.eastwood.com/ew-dekote-paint-stripper-5-gallon.html

    That is the best way. Expensive, but the best.
     
  10. 3x2rocket
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 248

    3x2rocket
    Member

    X2 BRAKE FLUID! works especially good if you let it soak, you'll simply wipe that paint off with no need for abrasives or rubbing.
     


  11. I have a set of 4 nice chrome backing plates (early Ford) that the recessed area chrome is not the best...like they were gonna plan on painting the centers (I bought them already plated) so I planned on painted the centers. But I do not want the paint to flake off
     
  12. tommy
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 14,757

    tommy
    Member Emeritus

    I bought a pair of old chrome backing plates with red recesses that were done back in the 50s. The paint is till adhering just fine. I prefer old chrome.

    I've been told about a product called Bulldog used as a primer to paint door jambs without a lot of sanding in production shops.

    [​IMG]

    If I were really concerned I might give this a try but I'm cheap and I personally don't think it will be a problem. If the chrome is not that nice in there, then it probably has some good tooth to it already. JMO
     
  13. I have used bulldog in aerosol cans and the stuff works quite well.
     
  14. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,297

    swissmike
    Member

    Why do people always want to use everything but the obyious. It's called PAINT STRIPPER for a reason. Do you guys also use your proprietary mixture of cat pee, EVOO, brake fluid and Canel No 5 when you want to strip a complete body?
     
  15. Yes and the exact mixture is a family secret.
     
  16. ChromePlaterJosh
    Joined: Feb 15, 2009
    Posts: 667

    ChromePlaterJosh
    Member

    Thanks for listening.
    Misinformation about electroplating is all too common. I've had fellow platers try to tell me lies about plating; before they knew I was a plater of course. ;)


     
  17. bigorford
    Joined: Dec 26, 2011
    Posts: 13

    bigorford
    Member

    brake fluid is one of the best paint removers available, you just need a big container and a enough fluid to soak it in, won't affect the chrome!Also works for plastics too!
     

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