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Beer Keg to the Rescue.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Boeing Bomber, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. 38chief
    Joined: Nov 13, 2012
    Posts: 2

    38chief
    Member
    from canada

    I had friend who built a bucket (years ago) and used a keg for a gas tank. No baffles and the tank was mounted quite high and this was a light car. The only problem was the tank was higher than the carb and gas would flood the engine (over nite) and lock the engine. The remedy was to put a shut off valve at the tank and try to remember to open it up or close it!
     
  2. Boeing Bomber
    Joined: Aug 5, 2010
    Posts: 1,079

    Boeing Bomber
    Member

    If I mount the keg as pictured, I don't think it would be higher than the carb, but wouldn't the electric fuel pump, and regulator I have solve that possible problem?
     
  3. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,598

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I used to sit on one (upright) when I played ragtime piano.

    Fred Finn gave me the idea...He was the husband of Mickey Finn's, played at their bar of the same name.
     
  4. mashed
    Joined: Oct 15, 2011
    Posts: 1,474

    mashed
    Member
    from 4077th

    I think Dana Barlow would care to argue about that rat rod connotation.

    As a matter of fact I would believe he's cemented the practice as a traditional modification.
     
  5. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    Many of us used those on dirt tracks back in the 70s. Aluminum tanks are thick enough to drill and tap fittings into them. I think the side bung hole can be tapped for 2 inch pipe. They are real tough and can take quite a hit. Others used car tanks like the VW but they were weak and would fail when hit causing dangerous fires. Eventually, fuel cells were required.
     
  6. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    The needle and seat shuts off fuel flow under fuel pump pressure. It should be easy for it to stop the flow of gravity feed. If the carb leaks fuel into the manifold, it's a different story as gravity will keep the bowl full.
     
  7. Boeing Bomber
    Joined: Aug 5, 2010
    Posts: 1,079

    Boeing Bomber
    Member

    Great input Engine man. I was thinking I'd have to weld a bung in, now I'll consider just drilling and tapping a hole. What do you think of a bead of JB Weld around the top of the fitting, where it meets the keg?
     
  8. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,492

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I understand, but if you have a marginal needle/seat, there can be some fuel that gets past it. Keep in mind that when an engine is running, it can keep up with a slightly leaky needle and seat, as long as the amount of fuel being leaked is equal to or less than the engine needs to run. As an example, let's assume that your engine uses a half gallon of fuel an hour just idling. If the carb is full and the float has the needle and seat closed, but there is a half gallon of fuel getting past the needle and seat in an hour, you'll never know that you have a leaky needle/seat. But when you shut the engine off and fuel continues to seep due to gravity, even if it's a lot less than that half gallon per hour rate due to fuel pump pressure, there is going to be some fuel collecting somewhere, and I'll guarantee that it's not going to be going out the exhaust pipe.
     
  9. Boeing Bomber
    Joined: Aug 5, 2010
    Posts: 1,079

    Boeing Bomber
    Member

    Well, I took all your advice into consideration, Thank you all. This is the set up I came up with, and it's been working GREAT. I'm back on the road for the first time this summer. All the good car shows have come and gone, but at least I'm driving it. I'll be replacing the straps with metal gas tank straps this week, but it's in there SOLID. There are 4"x4" 1/4" plates underneath in all 4 corners. The black rubber tube is my vent pipe, The copper tubing I picked up from a bro for $5.oo, and leads right to my electric fuel pump perfectly. I drilled a hole in the keg JUST barely big enough for the tubing, ran it to the bottom, with a slight bend at the end, then J-B Welded the hole. The cradle is made from some 2"x2" stock I had lying around, and the gas filler tube, and cap are off a japanese mini truck from Pull-a-part for $3.oo, It fit REAL snug. I pounded it in with a block of wood, and a hammer. That was then J-B Welded just for safety. No more rust & crud flowing through my system.
    This is only temporary until I go with "TANKS" poly tank. Thanx again everyone.[​IMG]
     
  10. dan31
    Joined: Jul 3, 2011
    Posts: 1,072

    dan31
    Member

    well I hope your user name stays boeing bomber and doesn't change to fireball mcgee
     
  11. heatnbeat
    Joined: Jan 6, 2009
    Posts: 184

    heatnbeat
    Member
    from Madera,Ca.

    Attached Files:

  12. Koz
    Joined: May 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,346

    Koz
    Member

    Please be aware what yu have done is illegal as all hell. It is a Federal crime to use a tank that was not intended as a fuel tank. The fuel tank must be designed and approved as a fuel tank (See 175.80(c)(3). Yeah I know everybody does it but bear in mind if you have a crash your insurance is most likely null and void and if anybody gets hurt you are liable to end up with Federal prosecution. Most states DOT. have similar laws.

    I know you'll do it anyway, just don't get caught.
     
  13. 2racer
    Joined: Sep 1, 2011
    Posts: 960

    2racer
    Member

    "bear in mind if you have a crash your insurance is most likely null and void"

    you will be crispy most likely, insurance won't matter
     
  14. This is only true on vehicles built after the law went into effect, probable in the 70s or 80s.
    And very little is a federal crime, the states are in charge of enforcement!
     
  15. blyndgesser
    Joined: Jan 2, 2011
    Posts: 167

    blyndgesser
    Member
    from Georgia

    Some things are illegal for a good reason.
     
  16. I agree with this, I used 1/2 plywood on my Dodge (because I had it laying there) and I figure that will give me a few minutes to "come to" or someone else to drag me out of the car.

    I saw an early 70s Chevrolet wagon that got rear ended. relatively minor accident, but the gas tank ruptured, spraying gas inside the car. Witnesses said 2 people in the front seat neither got a door open! (no damage to doors)

    Local people, car had a full tank of gas I had pumped into in earlier that day. (creepy feeling)
     
  17. BobsurUncle
    Joined: Dec 9, 2010
    Posts: 12

    BobsurUncle
    Member
    from Tracy, Ca.


    Why is it, all I can do is laugh at this?????

    Holy shit guy, really?
     
  18. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,792

    tfeverfred
    Member

    When I first read this thread, I didn't comment because it looked like you weren't really going to do it. Now I can say, THAT is NOT a good idea.

    And "This is hot rodding." doesn't mean everything goes, regardless of what some neo-traditionalist say.
     
  19. 2racer
    Joined: Sep 1, 2011
    Posts: 960

    2racer
    Member

    did he really jb weld the copper fuel line in?
     
  20. slammed
    Joined: Jun 10, 2004
    Posts: 8,151

    slammed
    Member

    Look at all these FNG's. They everywhere. Most of these threads are redundant. As in 'would you really do _______fill in the blank______this?
     
  21. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 3,803

    choptop40
    Member

    funny fuc2ing thread , lets get plastered
     
  22. Koz
    Joined: May 5, 2008
    Posts: 2,346

    Koz
    Member

    I beg to differ..... I run a rod shop as a full time venture and as such try to stay up on both State and Federal legislation/requirements. The Federal DOT regulations require a fuel tank to be designed and approved as a a fuel tank. I Pennsylvania, where I operate, along with all the surrounding states that I work on cars for, the state law follows as well. There is no "grandfather clause" in the DOT or state regs., period.

    As somebody else on here noted, bottom pickups are also illegal. The lines must come through the top of the tank so a fractured fuel line will not empty the tank on the street. It looks like he has that covered.

    Another note, in many states, including PA., the tank must be outside the trunk and visible from below the car. The tank must be separated from the drivers compartment by 16ga. min. mild steel or stainless. Trunk tanks are not allowed along with trunk fills because trapped vapors could make the car into a virtual bomb. In most states bed tanks on pickups are not allowed either. I know a lot of guys run these and have for ages but they are dangerous and the premis of the law reflects that.

    If you'd like to read up on the Federal regs., you can go to the .Gov site and search under DOT.

    Not trying to be difficult but this shit is way too dangerous to be doing things like this to save a few bucks.
     

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