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Technical Basic Dent Removal Question

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by RMONTY, May 4, 2020.

  1. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

    What is the correct way to remove a dent of this size? Should I "dolly off" on the inside, and raise the outer edges of the dent, working towards the deepest part of the dent, or hammer/raise the dent out from the inside, gently.

    Fender Dent 5.4.1.2020.jpg



    Fender Dent 5.4.2.2020.jpg

    Fender Dent 5.4.3.2020.jpg
     
  2. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 27,327

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You might need to post some shots from a bit further away. We have some seriously good body men on here who can actually do repair work and not just custom work and maybe they will chime in. At least you have real metal to work with.
     
    RMONTY likes this.
  3. catdad49
    Joined: Sep 25, 2005
    Posts: 4,294

    catdad49
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Picture how the dent occurred, then reverse that.
     
  4. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 6,001

    anthony myrick
    Member

    Accessible from underneath?
     

  5. cheepsk8
    Joined: Sep 5, 2011
    Posts: 559

    cheepsk8
    Member
    from west ky

    You will get a hundred different opinions on how to go about this. If it were mine, "disclaimer" here, to answer your question. Yes to both. Hammering on dolly will stretch the metal though, so you gotta be careful. I would, if i could reach the back of the panel, apply a slight amount of heat to the outside of the dent itself, either with a heat gun or propane torch. I would not use acetylene. Take a shotbag and hold it over the area and either use your rounded dolly to bring it back out to sea level or a round body hammer would work. Once you have your basic shape back, then carefully work it "off dolly around the edges." The dent , by then, will show you what it needs. Sand and apply a coat of grey primer and block it for high and low spots. Don't get in a hurry, that is a 4 hour dent for me.
     
  6. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,797

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    That piece of metal is VERY strong, being in a tight curve like that. I would use a dolly on a post, and hammer as much of the dent up from the bottom. Then finesse it with hammer and dolly from the top. You could even round off a piece of hard wood, and do the initial bumping.
     
  7. G-son
    Joined: Dec 19, 2012
    Posts: 653

    G-son
    Member
    from Sweden

    I'm just an amateur, but I'd go with off dolly hammering around the edges, carefully bringing it all back to the proper level a little at a time. Which side the hammer and the dolly goes on would more be a matter of access - hammering on the inside would seem best, but much harder.
     
    RMONTY likes this.
  8. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,762

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yep, tap/push it up from the bottom, right in the center of the crossways crease. Once that is really close you will need to hold the dolly underneath as you tap the ( edges of the crease downward. As you know don't use too much pressure when hammering those ( spots into the dolly. Just use glancing blows to gently reform those high points down.
     
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  9. bschwoeble
    Joined: Oct 20, 2008
    Posts: 565

    bschwoeble
    Member

    Go to YOUTUBE. Many videos on what you want to do.
     
  10. X-cpe
    Joined: Mar 9, 2018
    Posts: 978

    X-cpe

    Looking at it, I would think there is going to be some shrinking needed in the finishing process.
     
    john worden likes this.
  11. @RMONTY Order this book, it has detailed instructions and can serve as a reference point on how to handle the dent you have there and alot of other techniques related to what folks like us do. My brother bought me a copy a couple years back, very informative reading.

    Sent from my LM-Q720 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  12. push from the bottom, with a 2x4, contoured like the fender, gently while slowly tapping on the creases at the top.
     
  13. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 6,001

    anthony myrick
    Member

    Bump from the back side with a piece of wood if possible. Then hammer and dolly.
    If not accessible from behind, a stud gun type puller could be used.
    I like to use shrinking discs to finish up metal work.
    Look one of those up and check it out.
    You always have the old drill a hole and yank it out method. Not my favorite but it’s very traditional. :D
     
    RMONTY likes this.
  14. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

    Yes absolutely accessible.
     
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  15. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

    What book? Dont see a link or anything...
     
  16. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 6,725

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I just got some slapper spoons so I can massage some dents and wrinkles in my hood. Watch some youtube videos on the subject. Yes to a little heat, yes to the 2x4 contoured to the fender to apply pressure to the dent center from underneath while you work the edges from the top, yes to the shrinking disk. It is just metal, is not very smart but it does have a good memory, all you have to do I remind it where it belongs.
     
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  17. john worden
    Joined: Nov 14, 2007
    Posts: 1,614

    john worden
    Member
    from iowa

    With that gauge of metal there will be more than "gentle" required.
    You also have some secondary damage a few inches away from the crease to straighten.
    As said previously move the damage up from below and count on having some stretched metal to shrink.
    Good thing is there doesn't appear to be any signs of previous repair work often showing as severe grinder marks which translates into thinned metal. That is a no no because it means you would be working with gauge of uneven thickness.
    The thickness of the original pristine metal gives you substantial material to work with.
     
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  18. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 4,952

    pitman

    It has some stretched regions. So a bit of shrinking is part of bringing it back. Youtube has some skilled demonstrations, based upon earlier posts. Good luck, pics will inform us if you can.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2020
  19. joel
    Joined: Oct 10, 2009
    Posts: 1,693

    joel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I would use a stud gun and weld pins toward the crease in the dent and use a slide hammer to pull SLOWLY while tapping down on the outside edges. As someone stated once you start, the metal will show you where it wants to go. There will be many opportunities for hammer and dolly along the way.
     
  20. donsz
    Joined: Nov 23, 2010
    Posts: 211

    donsz
    Member

    He might be referring to: The Key to Metal Bumping Paperback – January 1, 1953 by Frank T. Sargent. You can
    get it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Key-Metal-Bumping-Frank-Sargent/dp/B00CC3N0JG. Very expensive,
    at $98, possibly look in other places for it. I don't remember spending that much for it. It is a relatively small book,
    but excellent. It contains theory that applies directly to what you are doing. From what I understand it is one of the landmark books regarding removing dents.
    don
     
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  21. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,320

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Well if you want to be early sixties traditional get a trowel and about a quart of bondo and go to town! But seriously I wish everyone would refer to a body hammer as a "tapper" so that when using them they would tap rather than hammer...
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2020
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  22. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 4,952

    pitman

    ^A (panel) smashing idea!
    Ask Jeff Beck, or Clapton. ;)
     
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  23. 40FORDPU
    Joined: Mar 15, 2009
    Posts: 2,864

    40FORDPU
    Member
    from Yelm, Wa
    1. Northwest HAMBers

    As seems to be the norm here, many good ideas.
    If like most of us you have an old hood, fender, etc. not of any value laying around, mimic the dent, and put your chosen method to practice, after some confidence in your ability, apply it to the actual piece from the car you're repairing.
    Good luck.
     
    RMONTY likes this.
  24. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,976

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    God, please don't pay that much for that book. You should get it but it's available from Eastwood for 15 bucks. By now, you have figured out there is more than one way to skin a cat. Just ask a question on the HAMB and you will get a bunch of answers....some good, some not so much. You just have to guess which are good and which aren't. ;)

    https://www.eastwood.com/key-to-metal--book.html
     
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  25. I found many places to buy the bumping book for $15. Eastwood is one, Summit has it also.
     
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  26. sometimes one hit with a heavy hammer can fix something with less damage than a bunch of little taps....the trick is knowing when that sometimes is.;)

    to the op; I don't think there should be much shrinking needed, the stretch can be "lost" in that bulbous panel.
     
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  27. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

    Before...


    Fender Dent 5.4.2.2020.jpg



    After......



    Dent Removal 5.5.3.R12020.jpg


    Not done with it yet....
     
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  28. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

  29. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,320

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Good point but I was indicating as a general rule. I'm with the camp that says give it a good bump from behind. It may just pop back into shape. A contoured piece of wood or a rubber mallet...
     
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  30. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,964

    RMONTY
    Member

    ^^^ Unfortunately, there isn't a ton of room to give it a good smack. I bumped it on the inside with a rubber mallet as hard as I could, and then raised it on the inside the best I could with a cheap ass body hammer, then went at it with a cheap ass dolly and the cheap ass body hammer. So far, so good. The hammer and dolly dont know they are cheap asses. I think with a little patience this will turn out well! I can't really detect much stretched metal there. It is in really good shape as far as not being rusted inside or out.
     
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