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Technical Bare Truck Frame WHAT DOES IT WEIGH ?

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by chev34ute, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. chev34ute
    Joined: Nov 13, 2011
    Posts: 780

    chev34ute
    Member

    75B7541D-87BE-415E-B88D-EA12C5980330.jpeg Hey Guys.
    I want to strip this down, remove the front and rear ends and running gear and move it into my shed. Since space is limited, I have been entertaining the idea of storing it on its side. What I am wondering is what the weight of the bare frame is ?

    The frame in question is a 131 inch wheel based 1934 BB Ford Truck.
    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 3,541

    choptop40
    Member

    Bare ladder frame..around 100-125 lbs
     
  3. chev34ute
    Joined: Nov 13, 2011
    Posts: 780

    chev34ute
    Member

    Thanks for that !
     
  4. LM14
    Joined: Dec 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,860

    LM14
    Member
    from Iowa

    Cheap way to store it, easy to dig it out to work on it. Harbor freight engine stands cost next to nothing. Takes very little room to store the frame in it's side this way.
    SPark

    Rot1.jpg frame5.png frame6.png frame8.jpg frame14.jpg
     
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  5. mastergun1980
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 1,095

    mastergun1980
    Member
    from Alva OK

    tb33anda3rd, Hnstray and RMR&C like this.
  6. Yup. I'd guess around 300 lbs totally bare.
     
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  7. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,053

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    I have some 2” x 4” x 1/8” rectangular steel tubing 16 feet long. They weigh 90 lbs each.

    Based on that and an “eye ball survey” of your BB chassis (bare), I estimate it weighs greater than 200 but not more than 300 lbs.

    By the way, I am storing two chassis in that manner (on their sides), ’38 Buick and ‘54 GMC pickup. More efficient use of space than flat, but an even better way would be standing on end if you have the height in the building to accommodate it.

    The engine stand rotisserie is also a good idea. About 30 years ago I was restoring a Cessna 140 and I made a similar fixture for the bare fuselage. Really improved accessibility for stripping, cleaning, painting, etc.

    Ray
     
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  8. chev34ute
    Joined: Nov 13, 2011
    Posts: 780

    chev34ute
    Member

    08B87838-5F98-44EA-A05C-156C95855297.jpeg 26347693-D47A-4D14-BBD6-2373A863D9DC.jpeg Thanks for the feedback, 250 to 300 pounds is do able. The shed is too low to stand the frame on its end, but I really like the idea of using engine stands as a form of dollies. There is limited space in the shed and I want to turn it into a workspace so that I can start fabricating coupe and pickup bodies. The truck frame will be used for some of the hammer forming.
     
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  9. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,053

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Just curious.....how will the truck frame be employed in the hammer forming process?

    Nice fabrication, by the way.

    Ray
     
    chev34ute likes this.
  10. chev34ute
    Joined: Nov 13, 2011
    Posts: 780

    chev34ute
    Member

    The rear part of the rails are the right width and length for doing cross rails for floor pans and bracing for pickup cabs.
     
    Hnstray likes this.

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