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History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 2,786

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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    from FRENCHTOWN

    That reminds me of the scene in the new movie "Ford vs Ferrari" (highly recommend - unless you're a Chevy lover). When Ford was having problems burning up brakes on their heavy GT 40s they elected to change out the entire front suspension assembly on their pit stops. "Hey, its not illegal" was their reply when protested.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2019
  2. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,200

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    They only changed the rotors and pads in real race!!
     
    Old Dawg and Fordors like this.
  3. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,200

    ago
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    from pgh. pa.

    The movie took some Hollywood liberties. Miles drove the 65 Leman's race and the gearbox broke putting Ford out. He did not listen to it on the radio in the states. Shelby never physically fought with Miles. Miles was killed testing the J-car because of mechanical failure. The 1967 season didn't go as well for Ford, even though they won. Ferrari finished 1 2 3 at Daytona earlier in the year. Foyt and Gurney won the 67 race, and Ferrari finished 2nd and 3rd. Ford spent $500,000,000 and almost bankrupted the company.
     
  4. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 10,546

    gnichols
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    from Tampa, FL

    First seen hand colored for me. Looks good that way.
     
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  5. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,876

    Six Ball
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    from Nevada

    You say that like it's a bad thing. If you want to learn history there are books. If you want to be entertained there are movies. There may or may not be some crossover .:D
    Bugattis early on changed to brake drum with the wheel.
     
    '51 Norm and Bigcheese327 like this.
  6. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
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    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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    from FRENCHTOWN

    ago, Thanks for setting the historical record straight. Good movie nonetheless. I understand Beebe was not the SOB depicted either.
     
  7. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,200

    ago
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    from pgh. pa.

    I enjoyed the movie also. But it is terrible when you know too much history.
     
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  8. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,876

    Six Ball
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    from Nevada

    I can agree with that. That can apply to a lot of things around today. :rolleyes:
     
  9. Yeah! Phil Remington redesigned the hub system; making it possible to change the rotor and pads as they changed wheels on the pit stops. Guys like Remington and George Boscroff made many of Shelby American's mechanical and metal shaping innovations. A lot of things were left out or added to the movie; but"That's Hollywood!" I was in the same race as Ken Miles once. It was an "Under 1500 c.c. Production Car" race during the one and only night-oval event at Riverside Raceway (not International yet). Ken (between construction of his two specials) was driving a MG TF 1500. Note that I wrote "in", not "with". Though mine was a highly modified MG TD Mark II (2 1/2 liter Riley sleeves installed); he lapped me at least twice. The movie had one thing right: Christian Bale played the brilliant, obsessed Miles "To the Tee"!
     
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  10. tarcoleo
    Joined: Mar 28, 2013
    Posts: 34

    tarcoleo
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  11. tarcoleo
    Joined: Mar 28, 2013
    Posts: 34

    tarcoleo
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    I note that this topic is outside the time frame here. But seeing that there is so much interest in the Ford/Ferrari competition, I couldn't resist posting the doc. above.
     
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  12. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,249

    The37Kid
    Member

    We all need to check out Craig's List. This gem, a 1941 AAA registered D.O.HAL dirt car was just found by a friend. No info on drivers or owners but that info is WANTED. Merry Christmas. Bob left side (1).jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2019
  13. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
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    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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    from FRENCHTOWN

  14. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
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    Six Ball
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    from Nevada

    More Pictures? Did your get It? Treasure is out there.
     
  15. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,249

    The37Kid
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    Wish it was mine! Tying to help a friend trace the cars history. Bob
     
    chryslerfan55 likes this.
  16. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,966

    noboD
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    Have you contacted EMMR yet?
     
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  17. WOW- nice find!!!
     
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  18. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,249

    The37Kid
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    Not yet, thanks for the reminder. Merry Christmas!

    Bob
     
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  19. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,793

    banjeaux bob
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    from alaska


  20. I've found that most cars of this type have only the car's assigned number for the previous season (in most cases). Most times, other than numbers on the various engines used, there are no other numbers to follow. Some have AAA registration dash plaques; but invariably most of those have been removed for mementoes; or unfortunately by those seeking "History" for their own car.

    No doubt that this is a legitimate car given the evident patina, including the Firestone Racing tires (which also might indicate that the car was run after the conclusion of WW II)!

    With just a brief glance I took at Jack C. Fox's "The Illustrated History Of Sprint Car Racing" Volume 1, 1896 - 1942" I find a #91 assigned to Zip Larivee of W. Somerville, Mass.
     
  21. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,249

    The37Kid
    Member

    Thank you! That is the first lead on the cars history, great start of the new year. Bob
     
    chryslerfan55 likes this.
  22. Bob! I'm sorry. I think I sent you a "Curve Ball"! The process of assigning car numbers to contestants from their previous year's points standings was one of AAA sanctioned (I think Regional) contest boards!

    The one in my previous reply (reading the fine print) was that of the International Motor Contest Association (IMCA). I don't know how IMCA assigned their car numbers. I'm afraid it's a near impossible task to know, number one, if the owner of this car ran this car in AAA sanctioned events. And, if he did run with AAA, that number could change year to year. As I've said those tires seem to me the type used in the 40's (perhaps into the 50's). Even as an amateur, I change tires as I change my shorts; so it'd be near impossible to know what year that number was assigned. Incidentally, that number I sent you previously was for an IMCA event held in 1931!
     
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  23. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,793

    banjeaux bob
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    from alaska

  24. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 770

    Michael Ferner
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    That car is clearly younger than 1931! Forget the #, there were probably dozens of #91s running in the forties, and the number could change several times a year if the owner wished to, or the club he was running with demanded it. That radiator shell, however, looks pretty unique. When I find the time, I'll go for a look through my pictures, maybe I'll find something. :)
     
  25. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 770

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    I shouldn't have said "unique", because we don't know whether it really is or was the only one of its kind, but it sure as hell is distinctive. I checked my photos and I found a match, the (Andy) Dunlop/Miller (marine) of 1939, but that was a different car, with a different frame and bodywork. In his book, "Damn Few Died in Bed", Andy told how in 1940 he "made a new grille to replace the strange-looking one" (his words, not mine - but I have to agree, it looks mighty "strange"!). Unfortunately, he didn't relate what happened with the old one, but it's entirely possible he sold it to someone who was in the process of (re-)building a car.

    Dunlop was based in Eastern Ohio at the time, so he likely sold the shell locally, which fits in with the engine being a Hal, which was built in Western Ohio, although it sold nationwide; but there weren't many Hals racing west of the Mississippi. Where was the #91 found?
     
  26. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,249

    The37Kid
    Member

    Thank you Michael, the #91 was found here in Connecticut on Craig's List of all places. I'll see what I can get from the owner on the AAA dash plate. Bob
     

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