Register now to get rid of these ads!

History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,317

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    I don't know who is starting the LSR thread, but a good starting point would be this book by Ab Jenkins in 1939. He covers the early history of the salt flats and his efforts to promote Bonneville as the premeir place to go fast.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,678

    The37Kid
    Member

    What a great addition to the collection! Do you plan to restore it to the Gilmore look? Best wishes with the project. Bob [​IMG]
     
  3. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    We discovered another neat photo of the Frayer-Miller in The Peter Helck photo archives, and you can learn more about all three of the 909 c.i. air-cooled racers that were built for the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup race on The Old Motor.
     
  4. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Wow! Lots of great posts recently.

    Last week I found Joe Boyer's WW1 Draft Card. It took me a while to locate it, because I was using a date of birth from 1890, but as you can see on the draft card his DOB was 1889. Using this date it looks like he won the 1924 Indy 500 on his birthday (way to go Joe). It also appears that the form was completed entirely in his own hand, as the signature on top matches the signature on the bottom.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 161

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    Why do I suspect ZigZagZ we have another interest in comon: Family trees?
     
  6. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    My family tree is very boring, but locating original documents of famous race car drivers does interest me.
     
  7. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,678

    The37Kid
    Member

    This great photo was posted on the Cycle Car thread by new member Old Mad Jack, I think Buick built two of these "Bugs". I've always wondered if this was one of them in the 1920's with a conventional radiator and hood. Photo was taken at the Danbury, Ct. Fair. Bob [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  8. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Hi Bob, here is an article I found about the car from 1924.

    ZZZ
     

    Attached Files:

  9. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 161

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    Allow me to pose a question:
    Would you agree that most of the "improving the breed" was done by the small engienes in this period that intersts us?
     
  10. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    Much of the improvements came from Aircraft

    Many from the finance of "Gentalman Racers"

    AND a few from "Bootleggrs" too :D
     
  11. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    Would you agree that most of the "improving the breed" was done by the small engienes in this period that intersts us?

    Yes. In terms of engine development, it is all about rpm. Top speed is determined by power output, which is a function of rpm. Once they got to 3000 rpm in 1913, they had to start limiting displacement, 5, 3, 2, then 1.5 liters , remarkably quickly to keep speed in check, by which point they were up to 8000 rpm. Displacement limits, by racing or taxation, are artificial and arbitrary and caused many distortions in the engine development. Just like the supercharged hemi put the superior 4 valve pent roof on the back burner for 40 years until Honda did the science in the 60's. But there is more to a car than the engine and there were very interesting developments in suspensions, brakes, tires, etc.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  12. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    A certain Norman Wilson in 1939 at Brooklands driving an ERA captured on film by Louis Klemantaski.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Vitesse
    Joined: Feb 9, 2010
    Posts: 264

    Vitesse
    Member
    from Bath, UK

    One of my favourite Klemantaski pictures. Norman Gladswood Wilson was a South African and when the war came he joined the Royal Air Force:[FONT=Verdana, sans-serif] on April 18th 1942 Flt Lt Wilson, based at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at RAF Boscombe Down, was one of a small crew carrying out dive tests on a prototype Avro Lancaster which crashed at Heath Farm, Garsdon. All five on board died in the crash – accident investigators found that some rivets had failed on the tailplane which had disintegrated in mid-air. In a strange coincidence, on the same day, Flt Lt Bill Castello DFC, who had bought, rebuilt and raced Louis Klemantaski's 'Golden Austin' in 1939 and had been among the entrants in the Imperial Trophy at Crystal Palace on August 26th that year – the final pre-war International race in Britain – was killed when the 12 Squadron Wellington he was piloting was shot down over Kiel. Castello was just 22.

    Wilson is buried in Morningside Cemetery in Edinburgh - it appears he had Scots heritage - and Castello in the British military cemetery in Kiel.
    [/FONT]
     
  14. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    It is an intriguing image.
     
  15. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]


    The product of the fertile imagination of a Professor E. J. Christie, this gyroscopic unicycle was supposedly capable of speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, although at the time of an article from the April, 1923 issue of Popular Science, it had yet to be tested. This monster was 14 feet tall, weighed 2,400 pounds and used what appears to us to be a Curtiss OX-5 airplane engine for power. On The Old Motor as aways we have the whole story behind this monster with plenty more of photos and details.

    We are trying to find out if E. J. Christie was in anyway related to Walter Christie, they both seemed to "think outside the box" so there may be a connection.


    [​IMG]

    *Update* Mark Walker from the UK sent in the photos below along with this reply and we think that he has identified the engine maker: I think the motor is a 700 c.i. Sturtevant V-8 (very distinctive exhausts). The Sturtevant Model 5A was rated at 210 hp at 2250 rpm and was capable of producing a maximum of 240 hp according to the entry in Aerosphere.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
  16. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    A nice postcard from Spa...
     

    Attached Files:

  17. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    The only part of the Italian caption I could understand was Targa Florio.No date,drivers' names,or car make.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 780

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    I *think* that's Tullio Cariolato in a Rapid, 1907. Retired after just one single lap... which took almost three hours to complete!! :eek:
     
  19. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Luigi Fagioli driving a 1939 Auto Union Type C at Avus in 1939.Image via Audi Ag
     

    Attached Files:

  20. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    !936 Auto Union Type C,V-16 6.0 litre 545h.p.
     

    Attached Files:

  21. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    !929 Monaco Grand Prix. George Phillips(#14) in his Bugatti T35C leading Rudolph Caracciola(#34) in his Mercedes - Benz SSK.
     

    Attached Files:

  22. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Fiat factory at Lingott.
     

    Attached Files:

  23. Rootie Kazoootie
    Joined: Nov 27, 2006
    Posts: 8,134

    Rootie Kazoootie
    Member
    from Colorado

    Going "out of the park" takes on a new meaning at that joint. :D
     

    Attached Files:

    • fiat.jpg
      fiat.jpg
      File size:
      47.2 KB
      Views:
      184
  24. Vitesse
    Joined: Feb 9, 2010
    Posts: 264

    Vitesse
    Member
    from Bath, UK

    1937. :) No Avusrennen in 1938 or 1939 - or 1936 for that matter.
     
  25. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Thanks for the correction! I can only go by the information on the caption of the stolen image.
     
  26. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    It was 11:20 the cold crisp morning of February 12, 1908; just minutes after the President of the AAA New York City Chapter fired the gold pistol above the Times Square crowd. For the Race Teams, the feeling was nothing like the life or death ordeal that would lie ahead for the next six months. On the contrary, exhilaration was probably the better word to describe driving through hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers straining for a glimpse of these “horseless carriages” headed to Paris. Proceeding north on Broadway, the streets were lined with tens of thousands of people 8 to 12 deep for miles to the northern city limits.

    The race is on and the contestants are just about to leave NYC and start a race of epic proportions, stop by The Old Motor for Part 5 by Jeff Mahl.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  27. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    From a facebook page... actually from a 1925 or earlier Indy program.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
  28. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    This has to be one of the most unique early French racing vehicles ever produced. From what little information we can translate and piece together, it is a 1901 Truffault, powered by a 7 horsepower Buchet engine. It has been reported that the machine finished second in a road race that originated in Turin, Italy and passed through Pinerolo, Saluzzo, Cuneo, Racconigi, and finally returned to Turin. We have another photo and much more information all about Buchet engine on The Old Motor.

    [​IMG]
     
  29. 2NDCHANCE
    Joined: Sep 11, 2007
    Posts: 936

    2NDCHANCE
    Member

    I have to build a replica.....can't get the thought out of my brain......
     
  30. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Hungry? Homeless? Looking for a good job?

    Here is an interesting want ad that I came across recently:

    [​IMG]


    Here is a photo taken at the North Fulton Street address referenced in the want ad. I wonder if there are any treasures in this building?

    [​IMG]



    Below is a photo of Chevrolet and Van Ranst circa 1921 (note brick pattern in the background):

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.