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History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 161

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    Bugatti 7, do you have any information, photgraphs on Manuel Blancas, Argentine driver in Europe circa 1927? This is him at San Sebastian. This is his only photograph that I know of. Please help.
     

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  2. Here's some interesting pics from the Vancouver BC area. The track with the grandstands are Hastings Park, currently still in use, it's the local thoroughbred horse track.
     

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  3. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,222

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Love that #14 car in the 3rd and 4th pictures.
     
  4. Actually that was not unusual at all for Sig to include his long time mechanic and friend Jimmy Chai in pictures. Sig and Jimmy worked for over 10 years together. I am working on a letter to send to NASCAR to get Jimmy inducted into the Hall of Fame, he was one of the great mechanics.

    Linda Schainberg
    I
     
  5. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 783

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    Hello Linda, could you please use the "Quote" button when replying to another post? This thread is VEEERY long, and it's quite impossible to remember posts from even a few weeks ago, let alone last year. It would be really nice to know which pictures and posts you are refering to. Thanks. :)
     
  6. carl s
    Joined: Mar 22, 2008
    Posts: 741

    carl s
    Member
    from Indio, CA

    Linda,
    fyi
    Your last post (referring to several photos) wound up on The Vintage Sprintcar Thread, instead of this one-I left a note there for you to alert you.
    Carl
     
  7. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    We have a detailed post up on The Old Motor about the 1905 Ormond Beach Races and the three record speeds that were set at the event. With it we also have a 4 minute film just re-released last week 108 years later, showing some of the action on the beach.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. You're right (I never noticed)- that wheel is HUGE :eek:!
     
  9. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    Check out the sohc six that Harry Miller designed for the Leach Car Company of Los Angeles in 1921.

    It was a luxury car engine and he also designed a four for the company also. Does anyone know of any of them being used in the lower tiers of racing in the 1920s?? Full details on The Old Motor.
     
  10. Vitesse
    Joined: Feb 9, 2010
    Posts: 264

    Vitesse
    Member
    from Bath, UK

    Well, that taught me - and I suspect a few others - something! I've seen it stated several times that the 1938 RE4 was Harry's first attempt at a six.
     
  11. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 161

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    This is Eric Forrest Greene winning Rafaela in 1928, Santa Fe, Argentina. Bugatti 5hs 42min 16 sec, 33 laps avr speed 141,060 km/h. This was a dirt track, rectangle with four round corners. Ahead of a Hudson, Mercedz Benz, Delage,Studebacker and Stutz. Photo of picture on Bugatti wall, again.
     

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  12. bugatti7
    Joined: Jan 7, 2013
    Posts: 46

    bugatti7
    Member
    from Germany

    Eric Forrest Greene
     

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  13. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 161

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    Chapeau Bugatti7, perhaps, first picture is San Martin track?.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  14. bugatti7
    Joined: Jan 7, 2013
    Posts: 46

    bugatti7
    Member
    from Germany

    #3 Autodromo General San Martin Campeonato de Velocidad 1927
    or
    #3 Copa Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Autodromo General San Martin 1928
     
  15. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    1906 Vanderbilt Cup winner. Darracq 100HP driven by Loius Wagner with mechanician Loius Vivet.

    [​IMG]
     

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  16. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    1903 PARIS-MADRID TRAIL

    Article from The Auto Motor Journal - January 17. 1903
     

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  17. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    1903 PARIS-MADRID TRAIL

    The Auto Motor Journal - January 24. 1903
     

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  18. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    I like the racing mask in the photo. Kinda like Kato of Green Hornet fame.

    Here's a catalog page from 1907 with similar racing garb:
     

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  19. bugatti7
    Joined: Jan 7, 2013
    Posts: 46

    bugatti7
    Member
    from Germany

    Does anyone have good Bugatti photos from Vanderbilt in 1936? Thanks
     
  20. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    www.vanderbiltcupraces.com/races/year/1936_vanderbilt_cup_race

    Uwe,
    There is also a book titled VANDERBILT CUP RACES- 1936-1937 PHOTO ARCHIVE by Brock Yates. I haven't seen inside it but i'm sure there is a Bugatti or two. Best thing to do is ask Howard Kroplick. Follow the link i provided.
     
  21. T__N__A
    Joined: May 31, 2006
    Posts: 352

    T__N__A
    Member

    I wonder who has got the bigger set of B@LLS? My guess would be the mehanician, the driver gets to at least hold on to something during the ride......what an amazing car.
     
  22. onelung
    Joined: Feb 19, 2010
    Posts: 181

    onelung
    Member
    from Adelaide

    I'm hoping that Bugatti 7 can tell me anything about these two examples, please...?
     

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  23. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,883

    The37Kid
    Member

    Onelung, I believe the first two phots show Dr. Simeone's Bugatti, part of his great collection in Philadelphia. Bob
     
  24. The left two on the top row are pics of Dr. Simeone's type 57G Tank- don't know about the other pics.
     
  25. bugatti7
    Joined: Jan 7, 2013
    Posts: 46

    bugatti7
    Member
    from Germany

    correct, is Simeone's 57S Tank sports car
    [​IMG]

    is a replica based on chassis 57245
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  26. Don Capps
    Joined: Feb 13, 2010
    Posts: 111

    Don Capps
    Member

    I could not find any response to this query, therefore, will provide something, even if long overdue.

    The first recorded and confirmed use of the checkered flag in relation to automobile racing or competition is the Glidden Tour of 1906. It was quickly adopted for use at both track and road racing events in the US. Initially, it was used to mark the end of each stage of the tour. Its first use was not at the Vanderbilt Cup as suggested, but months earlier during the tour.

    Origin of the Checker Flag: A Search for Racing's Holy Grail, by Fred R. Egloff, published by the International Motor Racing Research Center at Watkins Glen, as noted in the query, goes into some detail as to why the use of the checkered flag during the 1906 Glidden Tour fits the bill as to being the first use of the checkered flag.

    See here http://8w.forix.com/rvm-vol9-no1.html and here http://8w.forix.com/rvm-vol8-no1.html for photographs of the checkered flag as it was displayed during the tour in 1906.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  27. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    This is the premiere episode of “WHERE THEY RACED: Speed Demons in the City of Angeles” by Harry Pallenberg: Producer / Director. Previews of what you will see in the film are in the thumbnails at the bottom.

    TO SEE IT CLICK HERE

    Los Angeles is famous for its orange groves, bathing beauties, sunshine and Hollywood blockbusters. Long forgotten is that it was also home to more auto racing and innovation than anywhere else in the world.

    With hundreds of vintage photos, lost archival footage and revealing interviews, WHERE THEY RACED is the documentary series that reunites the ghost tracks of Los Angeles with the cars that ran them and gets the families, historians and experts to tell the tales that give this history a victory lap by preserving these fading memories.

    Be sure to stop by every Tuesday as we plan on featuring the complete series and next week will feature the Santa Monica Road Races and important racing cars of the Los Angeles area as seen below.


    [​IMG]
     

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  28. Don Capps
    Joined: Feb 13, 2010
    Posts: 111

    Don Capps
    Member

    Again, did not see if this question was ever answered, so providing one.

    The A.A.A. created a Racing Board as one of the several boards that created in the weeks following its creation in March 1902. By that summer it was in place and, initially, simply adopted the contest rules of the A.C.A. that were already in use. In 1903, the Racing Board released its first set of Contest or Racing Rules. Therefore, contrary to what you were told, the A.A.A. did sanction events almost from its vey beginning.

    In the latter part of 1908, in the wake of its agreement with the A.C.A., the A.A.A. Racing Board was disbanded and then reorganized into the Contest Board and a new Racing Board. The Contest Board handled non-racing events such as reliability runs, tours, and so forth. The Racing Board now handled only racing events and hill climbs. However, there was much ambiguity and not a little haziness regarding the future of the Racing Board at this time.

    When the Manufacturers' Contest Association (M.C.A.) was formed in late 1908, it initially considered the A.A.A. as the agency to handle its racing affairs. It is a bit unclear as to whom turned down who, but the two did not finally come to an agreement until early in 1909 that the A.A.A. would handle the sanctioning of M.C.A. events. The A.A.A. once again reorganized its Racing Board, incorporating the Contest Board, and now becoming the Contest Board.

    The relationship between the M.C.A. and the A.A.A. was a contractual one, something most are unaware of it appears. After several years, the contract expired, that it is was not renewed, the M.C.A. pretty much faded from the scene, but the A.A.A. and its Contest Board continued to operate.

    Throughout all of this, the A.A.A. managed to retain its role in the agreement worked out with the A.C.A. as the national sanctioning body for the US, while the A.C.A. was the US representative to the A.I.A.C.R. for all matters related to racing at the international level. This meant that any records set and certified by the A.A.A. were not recognized by the A.I.A.C.R., a state of affairs that was not resolved until the mid-20's when the A.A.A. Contest Board took its place on the C.S.I. replacing the A.C.A., after which the A.C.A. very much faded from the scene.
     

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