Register now to get rid of these ads!

History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    If you are so angry about Borgeson's work, you should file a protest with the SAE, I can give you a few names. Perhaps there is someone who can find some evidence for your speculative theory. In English, the predecessor engine is by definition the father, as in the Model T is the father of the Model A. Have you ever seen Michael Jackson's father ?
     
  2. gilmore
    Joined: Apr 28, 2009
    Posts: 89

    gilmore
    Member
    from Missouri

    Technically, the Model A is the predecessor/father, as it came out before the T, in 1903. ;)
     
  3. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    So, the 1928 "A" would be it's own grandfather ? I thought those things only happened in Hollywood , after the fourth marriage.
     
  4. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    No replacement for displacement.

    I don't think Carol Shelby ever met Walter Christie, but they had similar ideas. Each one of those cylinders is larger than the early small block Ford. I walked though Christie's old neighborhood the other day. His shop building is long gone, but if you bother to look up, you can see the same massive cast iron building facades he saw in 1907. Makes it easier to imagine the battleship turrets, armor plating, steam engines and Jules Verne race cars moving about 100 years ago.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,649

    The37Kid
    Member

    Were in NYC was the Christie shop? Most people don't think of New York as a race car center but it was. Bob
     
  6. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    519 East 18th Street, near the Hudson River. Hard to imagine going out to Brooklyn to see Depalma on the boards these days. NYC is about as anti-car, especially anti-race car, as it ever has been. The current plan seems to be to use technology to locate, tax, shackle and eliminate all private ownership, except for the very few.
     
  7. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 779

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    Once again, I'm having a hard time understanding what you're talking about. Why should I be angry about Borgeson's work, and what the heck has the Society of Automotive Engineers got to do with that?? And what speculative theory are you talking about?


    The science of history is not a pissing match; it may surprise you, but most historians are probably quite level headed and grown-up individuals. If I am angry (and I'm not sure I really am), then because of people who have read a single book all their life, and feel the urge to explain the world to all the rest out here.

    And no, I haven't seen Michael Jackson's father, and your English is a different language from mine.
     
  8. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    The last Christie parked in front of the Firestone Tire dealer on 58th Street NYC in 1909. Unfortunately, this building is longer around, but there are similar buildings downtown where the car was built. Barney Oldfield made the first +100 mph lap of Indy with this 1200 cu in car in 1915.

    We are going to visit Walter Christie's grave, but the best I can manage is a 500 cu in Cadillac.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 23, 2012
  9. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,649

    The37Kid
    Member

    Nice Christie photo on the left, don't think I've seen that one before. Is it the same car as the one on the right after some modifications? This thread has been going on for so long that finding old Christie posts would take the better part of a day, I know the car in the second photo was scraped. Bob
     
  10. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    I think so, the last Christie on the left was sold to BO for $750. It was oversquare , 7 1/2 X 7, with 30 inch con rods. More battleship engineering than any Bentley. I don't know what Barney did to it, but with 1200 cu in, off idle performance was probably good enough. I'm sure it could still get away from the cabs at the lights on Broadway. What do you think happened to it and why can't we hope to find it in a barn in Conn. ?
     
  11. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

    The same last Christie, this time in Florida in 1910 wearing a steamlined body. He was hoping for 130 mph, but it only ran 118 mph (with front wheel drive). This car was probably built on 51st and 12th Ave, which is now the Hustler Club, certainly a more profitable business. Christie sold his first car for $7500 and his last for $750 (after another Lehman moment), so he quit making cars and moved on to aircraft engines, fire truck/tractors and tanks. His tank was the basis of the British Cruiser, Centurion and the Russian T-34, which was key to defeating the Nazis.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    Many .......TOO MANY! Wonderful cars went to WWII scrap drives
     
  13. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Here is an interesting pic I found on EBAY a while ago. It is from the 1920 Indy 500. The #32 machine on the left was driven by rookie John Boling, and he finished 11th in the race. What I find interesting is the view of pit road. We see some spare tires, a few tool boxes, and kegs (for fuel perhaps?). I don't see any women in the photograph.

    Would anyone know the pit assignments for the 1920 Indy 500?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Offset
    Joined: Nov 9, 2010
    Posts: 1,700

    Offset
    Member
    from Canada

    T-Head thanks for sharing perhaps you could post them of Rail Fans of the HAMB as well.
     
  15. Dynoroom
    Joined: Feb 26, 2008
    Posts: 539

    Dynoroom
    Member

    Carroll ;)
     
  16. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    Nice collection furby! I have been after a copy of Full Throttle for some time but i can't seem to find one in any local antique bookshops and in the past three months i have twice been outbid by a measley 50 cents, most probably by someone who has no interest in the subject. I see you also have Motor Racing and Record Breaking. This is another book i hope to get my hands on someday. Is this a book worth the money and could you tell me if the subject matter is worthwhile?
     
  17. Full Throttle is a great read, think it was heavily ghost written. My copy is particularly sad, a 3rd edition, but included in it is a newspaper clipping of Mr. Birkin's obituary clipped by the original owner.

    Motor Racing and Record breaking is nice shelf stuffer material, picked up my copy for about 20 bucks. Nothing truly remarkable.
     
  18. Furb...

    Just how many shoehorns DOES it take to get you into your MG???
     
  19. onelung
    Joined: Feb 19, 2010
    Posts: 181

    onelung
    Member
    from Adelaide

    http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/Sea...all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=full+throttle&x=83&y=7
    :)
     
  20. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,433

    noboD
    Member

    In the FWIW column on books, the AACA libaray has a copy of Ricardo's book that was mentioned here recently. Chris, the librarian, is copying it to disc for me. I know there's already a digital copy online that can be read for free. But Chris got a new copyer and needs the workout, and this way I get to donate to a good cause.
     
  21. well, with the seat all the way back in the TC, I rest my left foot on the firewall...no need for a dead pedal. I fit fine, it is the passenger who can be in the way of my elbows from time to time. The only reason i keep the windshield up is not to blow the better half's hair everywhere. :rolleyes:
     
  22. The other Eyston book that is a great read, is "Speed on Salt" by Capt. Eyston and W.F. Bradley, well worth the time to find as it is a great adventure story about breaking the landspeed record with at Bonneville in the 30's. Covers a good deal of history.
     
  23. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    Thanks. I keep my eye on that particular market place. Unfortunately i haven't found a copy that's to my liking. I like my books to be in VG shape and it must have a dust jacket otherwise i'm not interested. I'm just fussy.

    There's one very good 1st edition copy minus it's DJ for sale as we speak so i won't be seeing that in my hands. But, I've found a mint, unopened Floyd Clymer produced copy for a little less than an original so i'll probably settle for that.

    I just picked up Malcolm Campbell's Book of Famous Motorists and, finally, bought an acceptable copy of George Monkhouse's Mercedes book. Next on the list is The John Cobb Story and Sir Henry Segrave by Cyril Posthumus.
     
  24. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    Howard Kroplick and the ALCO Black Beast having a small starring role in the mini series The Men Who Built America.

    www.vanderbiltcupraces.com/

     
  25. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    ....
     

    Attached Files:

    • emp.jpg
      emp.jpg
      File size:
      174.9 KB
      Views:
      128
  26. Big White speedster.
     
  27. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    Neat photo and info.....Hope all is well down under.
     
  28. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    This is another great lantern slide of The New York to Paris race Thomas Flyer and crew, from the photos we are posting for The Henry Ford. Stop by and see it and others along with an interesting video.
     
  29. indyrjc
    Joined: Nov 8, 2008
    Posts: 968

    indyrjc
    Member
    from Indiana

    For some reason John Boling also raced under the name of John Boyd. He shows up under that name winning some races in Kansas and Texas I believe. I even heard Donald Davidson mention this one time on his radio show and he stated that even he wasn't sure if Boyd or Boling was the actual given name of the driver in your photograph. :)
     
  30. Track Rod
    Joined: Dec 29, 2010
    Posts: 16

    Track Rod
    Member

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.