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History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,659

    MrModelT
    Member

    Bob,

    Thank you so much for adding your very thorough insight on Tetzlaff's LSR run in 1914!

    ...there were some things I didn't know!
     
  2. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 3,047

    jimdillon
    Member

    I agree Robert good stuff-Jim
     
  3. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,308

    ehdubya
    Member

    x3 I really appreciate you sharing your research on this remarkable event Robert
     
  4. Great write up. I scored a little book on Land speed records written in the 30's that had a little quip on that event.
     
  5. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,659

    MrModelT
    Member

    Robert is really an exceptional person, whom I finally had the good fortune to meet on the Salt at Bonneville this year for Speed Week. He is exceedingly knowledgeable on this subject as well as the New York -to- Paris Race of 1908...of which I am also an enthusiast.

    Thanks again my friend! :D
     
  6. Rapid Robert
    Joined: Nov 7, 2009
    Posts: 61

    Rapid Robert
    Member

    Thanks everyone for the kind words, especially Clayton for the heads-up. The 1914 event is a passion of mine. I have been researching it for many, many years. Look for a complete telling of the tale as part of Landspeed Louis Noeth's revisioning of her Bonneville Salt Flats book, slated for publication next year, just in time for the Salt Centennial in 2014.
    Bob.
     
  7. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Wow! Lots of great posts this week. I just can't get enough of this stuff.

    In regards to Tommy Milton running at Daytona, I've read that a number of racers spent some time in Cuba during the spring of 1920. There was a nice piece in Motor Age that reported on this, and included a few pictures.

    I was curious about the trip, and found some interesting photos from the Havana Oriental Race Track (sometimes referred to as the Havana Hippodrome). Below is a link which has photos of Cuban racer Marcelino Amador:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/umdigital/sets/72157623641929612/

    Did any of the Americans race in Havana in 1920, or was the trip simply R&R, fine cigars, and rum cocktails?
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2012
  8. that is super cool! always wanted to go see speed week, this maybe the nudge I needed.
     
  9. carl s
    Joined: Mar 22, 2008
    Posts: 741

    carl s
    Member
    from Indio, CA

    Some chatter from autosport nostalgia forum.
    note Pete De Paolo's recounting of his Uncle's tire strategy. :>)
    http://forums.autosport.com/index.php?showtopic=156194&hl=oriental
    Carl

     
  10. a whole pile of random non-sensical differences.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. here is a real head scratcher of progression.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Ferndinand Charon with an Alda at the '14 GP

    [​IMG]
     
  13. SteveLines
    Joined: Jun 15, 2007
    Posts: 124

    SteveLines
    Member
    from England

    Could anyone let me have a direct email address for the archive at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, please?

    I have tried contacing them through using the main IMS email address several times and have never received a reply!
     
  14. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    The colorized Peugeot photo is GREAT....I stole it for a header photo on The Old Motor.
     
  15. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,960

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Enjoy...
     

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  16. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,308

    ehdubya
    Member


    ZZZ in King of the Boards Gary Doyle refers to it as both racing and an exhibition and I've seen it referred to as a demonstration somewhere else so I guess that's what it was.
    Marcelino Amador seems to have been a man of means, thanks for those.
     
  17. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    Nice antidote about the tire situation in Havana. I've read that the track, like most during this era, was primariy used for thouroughbred racing. Racers are always looking for an edge.

    I found a copy of Louie's 1920 passport application (see below). The stated nature of the Cuba trip was "automobile business". I remember reading in Motor Age that there was talk of possibly building a new board track in Havana. Sheepshead Bay had shut down, and the drivers would have embraced the idea of a new track.
     

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  18. 1913 GP Delage:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2012
  19. Cris
    Joined: Jan 3, 2005
    Posts: 805

    Cris
    Member
    from Vermont

  20. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,960

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Tazio Nuvolari repairing a Bianchi having dual overhead cams(ca. 1926).
     

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  21. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    After Fur Buscuit posted this neat colorized photo of a Peugeot, it prompted us to put together a detailed post on The Old Motor about these fine cars. Below is one page of four from a detailed article in The Automobile dated Sept. 26, 1912. Below that is the first of two pages from The Automobile dated Feb. 12, 1914, telling and showing the updates made to the car and the engines. All can be seen on The Old Motor.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  22. great stuff on the GP Peugeot!!!
     
  23. MrModelT
    Joined: Nov 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,659

    MrModelT
    Member

  24. T-Head
    Joined: Jan 28, 2010
    Posts: 3,935

    T-Head
    Member
    from Paradise.

    [​IMG]

    Glad you enjoyed it, it is always interesting to learn more about them.

    In case you missed it I posted this photo of Burman at Indy as it is one of the best photos I have seen of one yet. On The Old Motor we also have three sectional enlargements so you can see it in great detail. Can anyone give us a postive ID the CAC badge on the hood??
     
  25. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,960

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Doug,I had one of those badges years ago.The "C" was shaped much like the "C" in the Chicago Cubs emblem.I thought perhaps the Chicago Atheletic Club.It was painted Blue and red.I mounted it to a plaque I had made and gave it to my sister who held her wedding reception at the Chicago Athletic Club.I know I have promised a lot of images,I'll see if I can get her to get me an image.

    Bob
     
  26. great image! I love the miller carb control on the side of the body, i have one of those for a model T ford.
     
  27. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 779

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    I'm a bit late on the LSR debate, and I must admit to not having read through all the relevant posts (time!), but I just wanted to chime in and remind everyone that the AAA was not a member of the AIACR until 1928. Before that, the ACA was the official member for the USofA (in fact, they were still the official member after 1928 until, I believe, ACCUS was formed, but delegated all matters to the AAA). Had the ACA timed the record runs of de Palma, Milton et al, they would have been accepted by the AIACR, but the AAA was an "outlaw" from an international point of view. Having said that, I have absolutely no doubt about the veracity of the AAA records - this organisation was perhaps the most bureaucratic and pedantic sanctioning body in the world, probably even more so than the ACF.

    I could go on and on about the politics involved, but have neither the time nor the inclination to do so right now. Fact is, the Hornsted record was the "AIACR record", and as such accepted by virtually every sporting authority in the world, including the ACA (!), while de Palma and Milton held the "AAA record", accepted only by the AAA which, at the time, was the de facto sporting authority of the US. And to complete the picture, there was also the fraudulent "IMCA record" of Sig Haugdahl, accepted by the IMCA which was to auto racing what "professional wrestling" is to olympic wrestling today - basically, an entertainment spectacle.

    The AAA, it has to be said, always accepted all AIACR records, not least because they really wanted to be admitted to this august body. I have a 1970 USAC media guide (USAC being essentially the AAA under a new name), which has a chapter on "The History of the Mile Record", and here all AIACR records were listed as "World's" records, with the AAA records (including Ford, Burman, de Palma and Milton) as "American" records. Bureaucratic, and correct!
     
  28. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 779

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Difficult to say from the surroundings, but I'm sure this is Jerry Wonderlich in the "real" ex-Dubonnet GP Duesey at Beverly Hills on April 2, 1922, or possibly at San Carlos a fortnight later. The riding mechanic is presumably Ray Cariens. Both Harry Hartz's and Wonderlich's car were repeatedly described as being the former Dubonnet car, but from the road registration we can see that Hartz had the ex-Boyer car.
     

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