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History Auto racing 1894-1942

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska


    It looks like the same style as the early Michelin Man artwork.I wonder if it is the same artist?
     
  2. Miller 91
     

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  3. onelung
    Joined: Feb 19, 2010
    Posts: 181

    onelung
    Member
    from Adelaide

    Lucien-Henri Weiluc, 1873-1947. Google images for him ... doesn't appear to be the Michelin artist, so I wonder who was*.
    All very Lautrec/Art Deco/Nouveau-ish. Lovely stuff.

    *dial up "Bibendum" in Wikepedia...(duh!)
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2012
  4. ZigZagZ
    Joined: Oct 24, 2011
    Posts: 243

    ZigZagZ
    Member
    from LA

    The headlights & grill work look like a skull.

    Very interesting indeed. Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    Zig

    Yes it is a skull........ I think we need to remember that in 1902 Europe a lot more drugs we legal than today. I've an original 1906 Peugeot poster.... the artist was without doubt on drugs.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2012
  6. Vitesse
    Joined: Feb 9, 2010
    Posts: 264

    Vitesse
    Member
    from Bath, UK

    I suspect L'Assiette au Beurre were aiming that issue at the still significant anti-car lobby. As the French wiki page about the magazine says, it was "un journal illustré français ouvert aux dessinateurs anarchistes."

    Weiluc is best-known for Le Froufrou, but as you can see here, he also did a poster for Bayard:

    http://www.allposters.fr/-st/Lucien-Henri-Weiluc-Affiches_c29250_.htm
     
  7. onelung
    Joined: Feb 19, 2010
    Posts: 181

    onelung
    Member
    from Adelaide

    Should we define "drug"? Alcohol, nicotine, blah blah blah ... so here's another "drug", apparently endorsed by Weiluc;)
     

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  8. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    I just received the July copy of The Automobile, an issue i was looking forward to reading since it has a very good, albeit brief account by Stefan Ittner of the very rare German made Steiger. I was pleasantly surprised to see a wonderful photo on the first page of Walter Kaufmann and Hans Mensch at the 1923 Klausen Pass Hillclimb which immediately reminded me of the superb photos Banjeaux Bob posted a couple pages back.
     

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  9. psalt
    Joined: Apr 17, 2010
    Posts: 101

    psalt
    Member
    from nyc

  10. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    Starting on the mag is cheating!:)
     
  11. memaerobilia
    Joined: Mar 24, 2004
    Posts: 191

    memaerobilia
    Member

    Some early starting magnetos, hand crank "booster' magnetos. First three are German Bosch("Anlass" =Starting) First one is pre-WWI. last one is WWI French.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,671

    The37Kid
    Member

    ^^^^^ Is it too late to market a pencil sharpener based on those BOSCH items? Bob
     
  13. memaerobilia
    Joined: Mar 24, 2004
    Posts: 191

    memaerobilia
    Member

    Much like the years when we were growing up, and one of the highest claims to Quality was to remark about German Engineering features, these have wonderfully thought out small details & features. The crank handles have knurled knobs, and they snap in an out with small spring loaded ball pins in a slotted shaft, that turns the armiture, once connected.
    As to pencil sharpeners, if you want to try to touch the back electrode, with a small metal mechanical pencil at the back, you will find that turning the handle will knock you flat on your "keester":D
     
  14. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,441

    noboD
    Member

    Rotation seems to be backwards, would that put lead back on your pencil?
     
  15. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    I have one of those ......it's great for catching fish. No sitting round they just pop to the surface and you pick what you want. Many actually swim away after awhile
     
  16. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,975

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Does the shock method of fishing affect the taste?
     
  17. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    Did that guy with the factory coveralls have any idea what he was doing?

    This LaFrance ex Atlantic City NJ hose truck belonging to one of my sons will start on the buzzer coil with only about a minutes prep.

    [​IMG]

    70 MPH go--15 MPH stopping

    Herb
     
  18. what wheels is he running?

    ALF's look so much better once normal wheels are swapped onto them.

     
  19. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    Wheels were made by an Amish guy. who made his living making buggy wheels. Don't remember the cost, but considering the amount of work not all that expensive.

    Incidentally, my son is the third owner of the car. It was converted about 1954, and was the first of the current craze to build speedsters from ALF's. Built by Phip Cressman, of Concordville PA. It's sister car (consecutive serial numbers) was converted a few years later by Dick Vincent, of Gap PA. Dick had machine shop equipment, and did some engine mods, that this one doesn't have--homemade aluminum pistons for one thing. Dick and Phip rode in Dicks's car out to the Ford museum. On the Ohio turnpike the toll taker ask how fast it would go (no speedo) Dick was purposely vague. The toll guy said "the car that passed thru ahead of you said that they followed you for miles at 82 MPH"

    Both cars are geared almost 1-1 on the chain drive. I think that the bevel box is 2 1/4-1

    Fun to drive, but the inability to stop is always on your mind.


    Herb
     
  20. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,671

    The37Kid
    Member

    Herb, Was Dick Vincent the fellow that lived in a two story red brick schoolhouse? If so were those 82MPH wheels cast aluminum? He'd use Corvair engine cases and anything else aluminum in his castings. The real head turner in his collection was the pair of 1904??? INDIAN tricars. Bob
     
  21. Herb,

    GREAT to see the ALF out in the sun again!!! How is the work on the jug coming along?
     
  22. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    Yes Bob, that was Dick. I looked at those cast wheels, and they were SCARY!

    We all know someone who was (or is) a "character" Dick deserved that title more than anyone else I have ever met.

    A short example story--TRUE!

    Dick stopped by driving his beatup 3/4 ton GMC pickup, the floor of which was bent so much that it looked like heavy surf. Dick made his living buying and selling used machinery. He had just come back from a 3500 mile trip, and was telling my son and I about it. on the way out he had delivered some small pieces of machinery which he was "listing" to my son and I. Mentally, we were both adding up the weights of the load. As I recall when we stopped, the weight was around 4200#, and there was still some more small stuff that we didn't include, nor did we figure in the weight for Dick, or Gloria, his wife--neither of which looked like they were starving. After the listing, I walked around the truck, and all the tires were either bald, or nearly so. I said-"looks like time for some new tires, Dick" his reply was--"I got better tires at home--didn't want to wear 'em out on the trip". When he left, and was going down our driveway, Ken, my son said "look at the back axle". The housing was bent from overloading so much that the rear wheels had a VERY noticeable camber. Ken said "I noticed that about a year ago--I thought that I told you".

    That was Dick.

    He was a very good friend, and God, do I miss him!

    (Had to wipe my eyes)

    Herb

    Bill- the ALF block is currently at a shop that specializes in welding cast cylinders, for antique engines. Rather than use the piece that Doug CNC machined (which I think that I showed you -last you were here) they are going to take the remaining pieces and re-create the bottom flange with cast iron rod--gas welding with the aid of a large electric furnace. They are waiting for cooler weather, understandably. I have seen their work, and it is amazing.

    H
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  23. I remember- sounds like a good choice (although the plate was fantastic). Can't wait to hear it running again :)
     
  24. Here is a Ford model T
    It has a special body which presumably was not manufactured in the workshops of Montier, but the engine was probably prepared by Charles Montier.
    The current owner, Orlando Rauddi found the car in a wreck in Paraguay in the late 80s. It was equipped with full disc wheels, which could not be saved.

    http://www.ford-t.fr/articles.php?lng=fr&pg=282
     

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  25. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,441

    noboD
    Member

    Herb, is this weld shop the Amish shop around Intercourse that makes boat engines parts? They just welded a block for someone i know.
     
  26. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    No..are you thinking of Cattail Foundry? They make cast iron castings for the stuff like what shows up at Kinzer--but to the best of my knowledge, they do not do welding.

    The shop I am referring to is G H Coates, 128 James Way, Elkton MD 21921

    www.ghcoates.com--they have pix of some of there work on that site.

    Father and son are both George, and they rescued a tug boat, the John Arthur--you can Google it. It's equipped with a honking big 6 cylinder Atlas-Imperial diesel. I had a ride on the bay in it, and spent most of the trip in the engine room slobbering.

    Herb
     
  27. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,441

    noboD
    Member

    Herb I had to look up the name, it's Moyer. They make parts for a four cylinder inboard engine. But the whole machine shop is run from generators, including CNC machines. Spindle on the drill press I saw was hydraulic. The are well known for welding cast iron. They welded a engine block that is a one of a kind Velie for someone I know. We were at Cattail the same day, quite interesting operations.
     
  28. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    I really like the Paraguayan car, especially the wings. I personally rate it equal to that of the 'Gaillon' in terms of overall proportionality although the blue car has far greater historical significance. I'm glad both were found and restored.
     

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  29. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,113

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    Not to get too far off topic but there is a small machine shop here that dates to before WWI all central system and over head belts. The owner is in his 90s and keeps telling me his sons use the machines... I keep trying to buy the stuff. I might own this stuff some day..... In 20 tears I have never seen his sons much less seen anyone operate the machines other that running them for me to watch.... the whole place is a time-warp and a ZOO of flapping belts when its all powered up The old owner keeps everything clean and oiled It is just wonderful!!
     
  30. kurtis
    Joined: Mar 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,989

    kurtis
    Member
    from Australia

    Photos. We need photos Bluto.
     

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