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Art Deco Rods

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Cody&Lauren Mohr, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. Dynaflash_8
    Joined: Sep 24, 2008
    Posts: 3,023

    Dynaflash_8
    Member
    from Auburn WA

    gotta love the 40s
     

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  2. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    There are lots of examples here of the later "teardrop" style of Art Deco. The earlier "geometric" style is rarer; the above Ruxton being the closest:
    [​IMG]
    There were some weirder paint jobs that were more definifive early 'Deco. I suppose the geometric bit was harder to pull off, so that a lot of the early experiments were rather awkward in a way. They appeal to me for the same reason. Here's an example, on a 4½-litre Bentley: http://www.vintagebentleys.org/_display_large_p.php
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010
  3. BeatnikPirate
    Joined: May 21, 2006
    Posts: 1,416

    BeatnikPirate
    Member
    from Media, Pa.

     
  4. The link isn´t working for me Dawie. I can´t see your pics at the top of the page either, unfortunately. I like your illustrations.
     
  5. scummy13
    Joined: Mar 18, 2009
    Posts: 80

    scummy13
    Member

     
  6. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    Try this one: http://www.vintagebentleys.org/carpages/uu5443.php. Scroll down to the black-and-white photo and click on it. That site is rather protective of its photos; can't right-click on them.

    I'll see if I can edit my prior post with a better source for the drawings. They seem to be invisible if they're sourced from within jalopyjournal.com.
     
  7. HRod 50
    Joined: Feb 22, 2010
    Posts: 760

    HRod 50
    Member

    ARt Deco works for me, but the nagain I was raised in Miami Beach, FLorida
     

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  8. flynbrian48
    Joined: Mar 10, 2008
    Posts: 7,146

    flynbrian48
    Member

    I'm into Deco style too, although I didn't know it untill we bought the first Spartan trailer, a '48 Manor, several years ago. Then, I started to learn a little about the Art Deco movement, and realized that is what I love about the cars.

    We have a '48 Pontiac convert, a '48 Diamond T 201 pickup, the '51 Pontiac wagon, a stylized '36 Ford "speedster", and replaced the '48 Spartan Manor with a '46 Manor, mainly for it's more stylish front window treatment.

    While our Pontiacs are late in the Deco design era, especially the '51 (it has lots of WWII aircraft influences, but is still Deco underneath all that), I appreciate the lines of the cars more knowing a little about the design influence behind them.

    It's funny how that trailer opened my eyes to an entire new appreciation for style, in cars, architecture, and industrial design. It's everywhere, or was, but there are many examples of it yet, and lots of the old still around to use and enjoy!

    Brian
     

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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010
  9. sled
    Joined: Nov 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,076

    sled
    Member

    No Lincoln Zephyrs yet???especially 37 to 39 3 window coupes..Im a huge ART DECO fan too....cant get enuff
     
  10. Damn I love Deco and Streamline Design....

    Rat
     
  11. historynw
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 806

    historynw
    Member

    I like my 47 Chevy had a big argument with the shop over putting the bumper splash pans back. I think they defined the cars looks. I love the dash and have made sure accentuate some of the design cues. I am presently looking for the right 35-42 car love the Graham Sharknose & Airflows.
     
  12. Here are some photos of the Art Deco Roadster I'm building. All from scratch, aluminum body, hot inline 6, 5 speed.

    1009Front2.jpg

    1009LeftFrontQuarter.jpg

    1009LeftRearQuarter1.jpg

    I've been working on the frame and should get back to the skin next month.
     
  13. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    ===================================
    I agree with you on the Graham Sharknose and
    on the Airlows. Too bad more people didn't think
    the same way too when these car were new
    as both designs where sales disaster and early
    finished off their respective companies!

    Here's a rare beast - a 1934 Imperial 'Airflow'

    Mart3406
    ===========================================
     

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  14. Seen at a show recently. Bugatti/Batmobile - probably the oldest car I´ve seen with curved side glass. It was huge.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    and a Stromlinien "Autobahn" Adler...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Adler details...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. evilgenius
    Joined: May 10, 2005
    Posts: 391

    evilgenius
    Member

    The irony of course is that when Art Deco was in full swing during the 30's, the early moderns HATED it. To them, it took the visual sound bites of what modernism stood for, made it a decorative art, and applied it to selling crap — sans any of the social value. But that's part of the reason why AD stood the test of time, it was so easily applied to selling cars; I'd argue that by the mid 60's the influence Deco had in the automotive industry was effectively over. And from a visual standpoint muscle cars had more in common with rods and customs in the sense that it was largely about letting the body lines speak for themselves, less irrelevant clutter.

    Anyway, it's all interesting.
     
  16. Angel of Sin
    Joined: Apr 29, 2010
    Posts: 35

    Angel of Sin
    Member

    Does anyone have any more pictures of interior designs that were done in the art deco style?
     
  17. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    How about a streamlined '37 Autocar??? :)
    Mart3406
    ==================================
     

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  18. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    1934 MvQuay-Norris Ford V8 Streamliner

    You wanna' see "Art Deco??? How about this
    for a radically redesigned and "Art Deco to
    the max
    " 1934 Ford??!! Auto parts
    manufacturer McQuay-Norris built two of
    these test and show cars in 1934, using - at
    time - brand new '34 Ford V8 frames, engines
    and running gear and then had two of these
    'ultra-streamlined' steel and aluminum, 'Buck
    Rodgers spaceship-like
    ' bodies built for them! :)

    Mart3406
    ----------------------

    http://autotimemachine.blogsome.com/2008/05/20/mcquay-norris-streamliner/

    The Auto Time Machine
    May 20, 2008


    McQuay Norris Streamliner


    You think you’ve seen all the strange cars in the world,
    think again. Several of these bizarre vehicles were built
    a long time ago, and today, their value increases as we
    count the days that passes by. Speaking of rare and
    expensive vehicles, have you heard about a vehicle
    called McQuay Norris Streamliner? I don’t think so…

    The six McQuay-Norris Streamliners was produced in
    1934 and was built to be driven by McQuay-Norris
    engine component sales representatives. McQuay-Norris
    used the Streamliners as test-beds for new engine parts
    as well as advertising the company, and for this function
    the interior was fixed with many dials and instruments to
    observe performance and engine condition. The
    McQuay-Norris Streamliner’s chassis and running gear
    were based on a Ford V8, and the aerodynamic bodywork
    was made from steel and aluminium attached to a wooden
    frame. The curved windows were made from Plexiglas.

    Here are some extra facts about McQuay Norris Streamliner
    according to Trombinoscar.com:

    The McQuay Norris Streamliner is an important piece

    of automotive history. The car was one of six such
    cars builtby McQuay-Norris, a St. Louis based
    manufacturer of internal engine and chassis components.

    The cars were built using a 1934 Ford chassis and running
    gear and the highly advanced streamlined body design was
    constructed of steel and aluminum over a wood framework.

    The aircraft inspired windshield and canopy design was
    constructed of Plexiglas.The cars were built to be used
    by
    McQuay Norris representatives for promotional
    purposes
    but more importantly they used as test cars
    and as such
    they were equipped with a multitude of
    gauges mounted
    to the dash to monitor the performance
    of various
    components. It is one of 2 such cars known to
    exist and
    the only one that is restored. It was restored
    in 1990 and
    became part of the Hemmings Motor News
    collection until
    purchased from them.

    =============================================
     

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    Last edited: Aug 1, 2010
  19. HRod 50
    Joined: Feb 22, 2010
    Posts: 760

    HRod 50
    Member

    Yeah Zyphers.. My New Favorite...
     

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  20. terrarodder
    Joined: Sep 9, 2005
    Posts: 1,101

    terrarodder
    Member
    from EASTERN PA

    Would my Terraplane fit the Art Deco Rod class?
     

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  21. garyv
    Joined: Nov 6, 2006
    Posts: 129

    garyv
    Member

  22. One fine thread!
     
  23. Customikes
    Joined: Dec 30, 2008
    Posts: 312

    Customikes
    Member
    from SoCal


  24. that is unreal. i've never seen one of those before....wow
     
  25. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    ------------------------------

    When the 'Sharknose-style' Grahans came
    out in 1938, the styling of these "Spirit of
    Motion
    " cars, as Graham called them - was
    extremely controversial and new-car buyers
    generally stayed away from Graham
    showrooms in droves. So much so, that the
    car's styling almost killed and some say did
    kill, the company's automotive division. But
    they're certainly considered cool and desirable
    - and even beautiful now- at least by some.
    Like them or not though, one thing for certain,
    they're definitely classic American "Art Deco".

    Mart306
    ========================
     

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  26. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

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  27. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    A short article from the June 1935 issue
    of "Modern Mechanics And Inventions"
    magazine on a 'futuristic' Art Deco bus
    made for the 1935 Paramount movie
    "Stolen Harmony" Now that I've seen
    pics of this thing, I WANT one!!!!:eek::D

    Mart3406
    ==========================
     

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  28. flatoutflyin
    Joined: Jun 16, 2010
    Posts: 385

    flatoutflyin
    Member

    I've liked '30's Art Deco cars since I was a kid, but they are probably more like Industrial or Streamline Moderne. My history of art teacher corrected me when I did a project involving streamlined cars. Chrome, stainless, plastics [which were new then], parallel lines imparting motion, symmetry, minimalism, seem natural for automobile styling, even if the cars weren't really aerodynamic.
     

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  29. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

  30. BTT, Would love to see some Art Deco styling ideas, will be doing the interior of my '33 Plymouth in this style.
     

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