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April banger meet

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by V4F, Apr 1, 2009.

  1. BCCHOPIT
    Joined: Aug 10, 2008
    Posts: 2,594

    BCCHOPIT
    Member



    hey Crazydaddyo & Bill
    I dont have a C crank to look at but I am thinking if the counter weight is in the way for the best angle to drill the oil holes cant you just drill a 1/4 or 3/8 hole in the weight and just weld a plug in the hole after?

    I called the guy at Burlington crankshaft last year to see if he had any not finshed ground so it could be stroked a little but they all come done from CHINE. I just dont like 900 bucks for chine made crap even if it is a nice crank. Burlington Crankshaft is only 10 miles from my house.

    Bill
     
  2. Looks great Daredevil- keep the pics coming!!!
     
  3. CoalTownKid
    Joined: Mar 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,024

    CoalTownKid
    Member

    That really looks slick! Great job on that little lump of iron you have there. Sure wish we lived a block away from each otehr rather than several hundred miles,....keep us posted!!
     
  4. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,143

    Crazydaddyo
    Member


    I called Burlinton to ask the same questions when I broke my first crank.

    From what I know, the problem isn't the counter weights on the Burlington crank. It is the toughness of the material that the crank is made from. It is 4130 and the case hardeding is pretty deep. I've heard that there are tough spot through out the crank too. Slows down drilling and wears out the drills fast. I would hate to pay $950 for a crank, and have a drill break off in it.

    I have though of having one welded to make a stroker out of it, but the ante for that game of poker is a little high for me.
     
  5. Stovebolt
    Joined: May 2, 2001
    Posts: 3,280

    Stovebolt
    Member

    Just wondering - can you mount a mid 50's F100 steering box ina Model A chassis without having to weld a model A flange onto the F100 steering box?

    Maybe a wedge or something?

    I'm going to look at buying an F100 steering box/column, and don't want to waste $200 on something I cannot use in a banger powered Model A coupe

    TIA
     

  6. In the rails you mean? I highly doubt it, as its even pretty tight in a 32, BUT if you shoot me a PM at about 6 tonight or sometime tomorrow I may have a better idea for you.....ie using a steering bracket from another make of car, and i dont mean the VW outside the frame, i will just need to measure the bracket and the A rail to make sure it all works with minor mods.
     
  7. Dirtynails
    Joined: Jan 31, 2009
    Posts: 844

    Dirtynails
    Member
    from garage

    It can be done by someone familiar with tool post grinding. Grind into the hardening to the depth where it can be seen to go 'soft' then use carbide tip slot drill or end mills to drill the hole.
    But if you want to be cheap,and this works for regular cast iron too,get a masonry bit of the size and depth you want from any hardware shop. Dress the carbide tips up so they sharp and have accurate angles.
    Mount the crank in a drill press as firm as you can . Then using a slow(ish ) speed and plenty of down pressure and Flood cooling drill carefully. You need to feel for the hard spots and if the crank moves it will bust the drill quick smart.
    But being cheap ass drills they can be removed easily with a HSS drill.

    Hard spots in Forged or cast steel mean that the material is made from recycled scrap using pretty scruffy foundry methods. There is a a boat load of reasons why people don't like Chicom products and that is but one reason.
     
  8. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,858

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You might look into EDM machining. There are a few around here that do odd jobs.
     
  9. When drilling in hard materials the critical thing is the drill point. At time we would have to drill out an Allen set screw and the trick is to thin the point of the drill. The first split point drill I remember was called a "Crank Shaft" drill. Then they were called "Sheetmetal" drills and later(now) they are called "Aircraft" The point is flatter and is designed to almost be selfcentering. We ran a job that required a 5/16" (.312) hole drilled to a depth of 2 5/8' in 4140. Normally the formula for drill depth was 1 st. drill was 3 diameters 2nd was 1 1/2 diameter 3 thd and further was 1 dia. I changed to a Gurhring deep hole drill which could go 5 diameters on the 1 st drill and we went 2 + diameters on the 2 nd drill. This would be my choice of drill. With a "normal" drill point you are pushing or forcing the point through but the spilt point cuts. I will qualify this by stating that when I would put a drill in one of those machines I would expect the drill to last for several hundred or in some materials maybe thousand or more holes. Of course they were flooded with sulphur based cutting oil. I have always drilled common grey cast iron dry but if I were to try to drill one of these new cranks I would use a sulphur based oil. If you have an accurately ground point the next problem you can have is the "margin" of the drill wearing and the drill will eventually be the same shape as the hole and seize in the hole. The operator will always check the point for wear but after a drill is used several times in an abrasive material the margins will wear.
    My, I do carry on. This is more ancient trivia but I hope it might help some
     
  10. Tried that, I put just shy of 900 miles on it last Summer and the problem hasn't got any better. It jerks so hard going into reverse, that I'm afraid something is going to break. I guess I'm going to have to give in and pull the engine and trans. Luke
     
  11. I installed one in my RPU, I located the mounting holes then bolted the steering box in just tight enough to hold it in place and then placed a washer as a wedge and calculated (guessed) the amount to mill off. I think some one in the past made or was going to make a wedge. I just worked till I had the steering tube centered. Washers would work but I don't know how much stress you can put on the casting. You also will have to mill/grind the later box pitman shaft square or use the later pitman arm.
     
  12. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,143

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    It took me a little while to remember where i saw this, but it just hit me.
    Here is the wedge you need.

    http://www.speedwaymotors.com/F-100-Steering-Box-Wedge-For-1932-Ford-Chassis,6002.html

    [​IMG]
     
  13. The Wrong-Un
    Joined: Oct 8, 2004
    Posts: 402

    The Wrong-Un
    Member

    Vern Tardell does something similar I believe.
     
  14. Stovebolt
    Joined: May 2, 2001
    Posts: 3,280

    Stovebolt
    Member

    Thanks guys. I hope the wedge shaped flange will work on a Model A chassis as well as a 32, as its a real neat simple solution.
     
  15. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,858

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Recently recived spy shots of T block for V4F class.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,004

    noboD
    Member

    OOH OOH Baby how big are the sidedrafts, Rich?
     
  17. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 26,398

    The37Kid
    Member

    WOW! Is that all porting or has there been a lot of internal welding as well?
     
  18. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,143

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    Add me to that Wow above. That is some crazy porting.

    I'm assuming that it will be running a Model A crank?

    The valves are huge!!!!!!
    Nice work on the oil pump / filter addaptation.

    I hope it goes like hell !!!!!!
    .
     
  19. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,858

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I can say that there has been lots of welding for sure. The big valves was the reason for the spy shots. I don't know anything else about the motor. Be on the salt in Sept. and ask the owner.
     
  20. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,143

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    With that intake set-up , it looks like it will be running in a Belly Tank?
    .
     
  21. Dirtynails
    Joined: Jan 31, 2009
    Posts: 844

    Dirtynails
    Member
    from garage

    Thats why a lot of us use the cheap masonry bit,in this case accuracy isn't part of the equation and the cabide tips on masonry drills sit proud of the actual drill. Most of the flooding is to prevent the brazing on the tips from melting . I have used them to drill through a saw blade without too much drama and old files to show apprentices how to operate a drill press .
    Cast iron is essentially self lubricating due to it's composition so kerosene to flood out swarf is about all you need .
    One man's Trivia is another man's newly aquired knowledge.:)
     
  22. VNCduke
    Joined: Nov 22, 2007
    Posts: 659

    VNCduke
    Member
    from Washougal

    If anyone needs a A/B mallory dist i got one in the classifieds
     
  23. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,143

    Crazydaddyo
    Member


    I've used masonary bits to drill through hardeded die blocks and all I use is air to clear the chips out. Carbide is a wonderful thing if you use it right.

    My coments about drilling the burlington crank wasn't that it couldn't be done, It was just to say that it wasn't easy.
    .

    .
     
  24. jetmek
    Joined: Jan 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,847

    jetmek
    Member

    anyone on here ever try running an autolite 1100 (falcon 1 bbl) on there a? ive been toying with one and it seems to have a lot of potential but its too rich at idle . loads up the plugs and skips. id like to get some tuning advice from anyone whse tried this carb.....thanks
     
  25. The main problem with masonry carbide bits is the material on the imports is very fragile and I sure wouldn't want to try and pick one out of a $950 crank. One of the main problems in deep hole drilling is the chips packing and binding the drill, this may be what is happening and is thought to be a hard spot as the drill will not go further until it is cleared. I wouldn't try to drill more that 1 dia. at depth required. If I had more space I would tell you of the problems my son has machining, "reworking", parts from China from odd materials
    I will qualify my statements by my experience of operating automatic screw machines for 30 years. The first machine I owned was a 1917 Cone 4 spindle of 7/8" capacity that had tapered bronze bearings and was used at times to machine precision small collets that were checked on a machine that could detect the rollers from a "newer" machine with grade 3 Timkens.
     
  26. TV
    Joined: Aug 28, 2002
    Posts: 1,451

    TV
    Member

    Why would anyone go to that much work on a T block??? It's enough trouble trying to keep A's and B's togeather. I have never played with a T, am I stupid or are these blocks better than the rest of the Ford fours. --TV
     
  27. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,858

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I say again. Since when was any of this suspossed to be reasonable?
     
  28. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,004

    noboD
    Member

    Or easy. Or cheap.
     
  29. Bobby Green
    Joined: Jun 9, 2001
    Posts: 1,319

    Bobby Green
    Member

    Hahaha,... Ain't that the truth. Well said Rich.
     
  30. Artiki
    Joined: Feb 17, 2004
    Posts: 1,998

    Artiki
    Member
    from Brum...

    Those webers look insane up there! Love it.
     

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