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Technical Anyone install a windshield gasket on the glass first? 53 Chrysler

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by vintagetin88, May 25, 2020.

  1. vintagetin88
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 63

    vintagetin88
    Member

    I gots a question about a windshield gasket from Andy Bernbaum. Every windshield Ive ever done the rubber goes on the body first and then you install the windshield second. If there is a lock strip, it goes in after the windshield is home and the lockstrip goes on from the outside. For this 53 Chrysler I have a gasket that has the lock strip on one side, and the lip for the chrome molding on the opposite side. Thus the lock strip HAS to go on from inside the car, which means the gasket must be seated to the glass first this way the INNER lip is still plyable enough to work it into thr body. Am I crazy? Or is this how its done?
     

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  2. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,298

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    I don't have a 53 manual but do have a 52. It shows putting the glass in the rubber then installing the complete assembly in the car.It's quite an elaborate procedure and differs for different models of Plym Dodge DeSoto and Chrysler. These all had 2 piece flat windshields not like your 1 piece curved job. Sorry I can't be more definite.
     
  3. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,585

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    @vintagetin88

    As it happens, many decades ago I owned a ‘53 Chrysler and had to replace the windshield. In those days I had recent body shop experience including installing glass.

    As I recall, I believe the procedure for your application is to install the glass and the stainless trim into/onto the rubber gasket, but not the lock strip. Using a strong cord of about 3/16” diameter, tuck the cord into the perimeter of the pinch weld slot in the rubber gasket with the free ends at bottom center of the gasket.

    With a helper, set the glass/gasket combo in place with the lower section on the pinch weld. Slowly put the cord to ‘lift’ the rubber lip over the pinch weld flange, working side to side evenly, keeping hand pressure on the glass to keep it in place. Working from the center outward, then up the side pillars, keep working the rubber over the pinch weld. Occasional open palm hand slaps on the glass can move it in the direction in needs to go as the gasket is worked into place. After the windshield is fully seated, the lock strip has to be worked into place. Silicone paste or spray can ease this process.

    Ray
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2020
  4. Lloyd's paint & glass
    Joined: Nov 16, 2019
    Posts: 2,728

    Lloyd's paint & glass
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    In all of my glass experience I've never had one with the lock strip on the inside, but what Ray is saying is about the only way it's gonna go in. Unless you turn the lock strip to the outside and just say to hell with the trim ;)
     

  5. 4ty
    Joined: Dec 11, 2018
    Posts: 101

    4ty

    Just had the rear window seals replaced on my 40. Fellow works for Payless glass (Saturday job for me), used the cord method to install. That's how it was done back in the day.
    Paul in CT
     
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  6. low down A
    Joined: Feb 6, 2009
    Posts: 299

    low down A
    Member

    a few years ago i ordered a windshield gasket from the same guy, he was the only one selling for a 56 chrysler. when i got it i was dissapointed that it was not a factory molded gasket but a generic gasket cut from a roll, the same exact rubber you have. i contacted him is answer was that 's what we sell. i didn't use it .steele rubber makes the correct molded one piece
     
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  7. patterg2003
    Joined: Sep 21, 2014
    Posts: 622

    patterg2003

    I did a windshield on a VW beetle similar to that Ray describes. I was told to use a solution of dish soap diluted with a few drops of water to lubricate the rubber so the rubber would slip over the metal lip easier. The soap solution seem to work good.
     
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  8. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,298

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Shampoo makes a great rubber lubricant. Get some from the Dollar store for a $1 buck. Don't use your wife's $45 stuff. You will get in trouble.
     
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  9. I'm with Ray on this one.
     
  10. vintagetin88
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 63

    vintagetin88
    Member

    Thanks guys. This helps. I was able to get it in. There was absolutely no room for a lock strip tool. Also, the factory gasket was a long strip you cut to length like the one i got from Andy Bernbaum. You cut it, and butt the ends together in the lower drivers corner from factory. I use some 3m window weld to seal it up though. One difference is the factory one does not have a lock strip! It has more of a lock flap! It is locked on the outside. The new one, the gasket must be seated to the window first via some masking tape and cussing. I removed the molding spring clips from the cowl to give me some extra room and avoid breaking them. Also popped the dash pad off. You just pry on the front and it slides out. If you don't do this it is impossible to get the lock strip in. I used some string only to get the bottom lip started. The rest I worked in with a little plastic wedge tool (that i lost) and a scribe. I used a door card clip fork to work the locking strip in with the scribe. There is no room for a large rubber gasket scribe like the ones shown on the YouTube. I also use a dish soap/water mix in a spray bottle. Worked great. Took me about 6 hrs to complete. Now I have to figure out how to work the stainless trim back into the rubber
     

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    Last edited: May 25, 2020
  11. vintagetin88
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 63

    vintagetin88
    Member

    Just for recording purposes, heres the factory gasket x-section. Right side is out board. Notice the lock flap and trim lip are on the same side. I did not see any rubber for a 53 Chrysler Sedan Windshield listed from steele rubber products.

    If anyone can share some tips or tricks on how to get the trim back in the lip, I would be much appreciative!
     

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  12. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,875

    squirrel
    Member

    I doubt you're gonna be able to get the trim in it now. You needed to put it in with the glass.

    sucks when you can't find the right parts.
     
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  13. belair
    Joined: Jul 10, 2006
    Posts: 8,533

    belair
    Member

    Yep- the trim is held in place by the gasket as it closes up when it slips over the metal lip. That's why it was so easy, you did it wrong. If you hold your mouth right, you can uninstall the w/s and gasket and start over with the trim installed. Don't forget the little piece that covers up the gap where the ends meet. On 55-57 Chevys, only the top piece, which wraps around and also forms the vertical sides of the trim has to be installed with the glass. The bottom pieces can be slid into their clips (already loosely installed, pro tip), after the glass is in. Yours may or may not work the same way. Good luck.
     
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  14. vintagetin88
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 63

    vintagetin88
    Member

    Got the stainless trim back on. Used a scribe and some more dish soap to push the rubber lip over the trim lip. Not saying its the right way, but it wasn't too bad. If i had put it on before I put the glass in, it might have helped hold the rubber to the window. And I may not have had to use as much masking tape.
    Hopefully this thread will help someone else putting class in post war mopar.
     

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  15. belair
    Joined: Jul 10, 2006
    Posts: 8,533

    belair
    Member

    Good for you. I've seen stainless installed with a rubber mallet after the fact, and it was pretty ugly. Glad you got it to work.
     
  16. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,875

    squirrel
    Member

    I guess the lip on the stainless isn't as brutal as on the cars I've done, that you had to put it in the rubber first. Good thing you didn't listen to me.
     
  17. This is what I say. On my Ford the trim is locked into the gasket, the lower trim in my case. If the first go around was 6 hours, the 2nd time should be about half.
     
    belair likes this.
  18. belair
    Joined: Jul 10, 2006
    Posts: 8,533

    belair
    Member

    ^^^Experience is a great thing. Gaining that experience can be a booger.
     

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