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Anyone built a horseless carriage?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,223

    F&J
    Member

    That appears to be a boat motor. Some are called "dock knockers" because they can be made to run in reverse if you shut off the ignition when approaching the dock, and then as the motor makes it's last revolution, it will kick the flywheel backwards for a split second. So, if you have luck, you switch the ignition back on at that precise moment to make it run backwards, so you don't smash the dock..



    Typical horse drawn buggy/carriage, most had folding tops. There are still some out in the woods near here. I found the complete "metal" remains of one a few years ago that still had the top irons. Found it while metal detecting old abandoned homesites. If I had cleared all the iron parts away, there most likely would be a brass tag in the dirt, with the manufacturers name...but a detector can't find a small non-ferrous piece of metal, surrounded by big iron
     
  2. im aware of that it is a boat motor, but me+wooden boat=no time, so a horseless carriage i could live with + ive always wnated one.. and its running, restored by me and the old guy i lived next door to a few years back. and there is no shutof to the ignition on this one originally, you had to cut the fuel 300meters away from the shore (is what is stated in the manual from 1936)
     
  3. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,490

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Lots of guys built horseless carriages a hundred and ten years ago, then again 50 years later.

    There was a brief fad in the late 50s for building replica horseless carriages, the most popular being a 3/4 size Curved Dash Olds. They even printed plans in Popular Mechanics. You could buy the full size plans by mail order. Maybe you could turn up something with a web search. I know the AACA forums has a page of replicas, and they turn up there every once in a while.

    Here are a couple of sites to get you started. There are lots more.
    http://www.horselesscarriagereplicas.com/plans.html

    http://www.szott.com/carriage/carriage.html
     
  4. lippy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2006
    Posts: 5,470

    lippy
    Member
    from Ks

    My Dad built one in the early 70's 3 hp john deere engine on a shortened model T frame. Model T front axle and rear axle. Used a 27 chevy truck trans mounted sideways belt driven from the engine down to the trans with an idler on it. Had a chain from the trans to the T rear. He took the ring gear out and replaced it with a sprocket, slotted the housing for the chain , bingo driveline. Tiller steered, homemade buggy looking body, had hard rubber model T tires on wood T wheels, cushman carb on the john deere and a 51 hudson radiator on the rear. He made the john deere thermosyphon cooling a closed system, had a plate and hose off the top of the water hopper to the radiator. 15 mph. For brakes he had wagon wheel type brakes. He painted it john deere green with yellow wheels and put john deere decals on it. I think he got rid of the ignitor and mag and made a plate for a sparkplug and used a model T coil and battery. He painted it john deere green with yellow wheels and put john deere decals on it and People would say..I didn't know john deere made a car? He'd say..well, there it is. LOL.It was a hoot. Last I knew it was in spearville Ks in a museum. Lippy
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  5. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,946

    The37Kid
    Member

    No, I'm missing the new owner, hope the flip helps fund the Roadster or Steelback. Bob
     
    33sporttruck likes this.
  6. Hrp,
    That thing looks like fun.
     
  7. Im guessing shipping to norway whould kinda kill it for me.. :p
     
  8. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,946

    The37Kid
    Member

    If I unbolt things it would fit in a ski bag. Bob
     
  9. Still kinda heavy tho?..
     
  10. Here is one before it was torn apart and re-done. This is a 3/4 scale replica of a 1903 Curved Dash Olds that was built in the late 1950's. The company that built these(Autique)apparently went belly up and offered Oldsmobile their remaning stock of cars. Olds bought them and then offered them to their employees. This particular car was the last one they had and was purchased by my customer.
    Bob had it for years(he worked as a product development engineer for Old for 42 years)and gave it to his daughter who stored it away in a barn.
    He decided to get back into cars a couple years ago and got it back.Pulled it apart and re-did everything including a new motor(14hp Kohler) with alternator and upgraded lighting in the old lamps.
    I just finished striping it last month so I'm assuming it is back togeth DSC00830.JPG DSC00832.JPG BobSmallsReplica1903CurvedDashOlds 001.jpg BobSmallsReplica1903CurvedDashOlds 003.jpg BobSmallsReplica1903CurvedDashOlds 004.jpg BobSmallsReplica1903CurvedDashOlds 007.jpg er now and running.
     

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