Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical Any way of saving this flathead?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 39wagon, Feb 8, 2021.

  1. 39wagon
    Joined: Dec 13, 2008
    Posts: 32

    39wagon
    Member

    I've got a good running '39 flathead that has developed a rust-through hole in the water jacket just below the lower bolt on the exhaust manifold, rear-most outlet, passenger side. I've read on the Model T site about using original JB Weld and also using High Temp Belzona epoxy on Cummins diesels to patch problems like this but want to know if HAMBers have any PERSONALLY PROVEN solutions for this type of situation that doesn't involve using a torch. It's a good engine and I'd really like to save it. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Budget36
    Joined: Nov 29, 2014
    Posts: 6,688

    Budget36
    Member

    Post a picture of your issue, both here and on Fordbarn.
     
    warhorseracing and Desoto291Hemi like this.
  3. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,517

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It kind of makes you wonder if that is the only spot that is rusted though or pretty well rusted through. If you use a stock low/no pressure cap it might not be an issue to stick a band-aid on it. I've seen some migrant farm workers do amazing things on their cars with JB weld.
     
    RidgeRunner, 39wagon and VANDENPLAS like this.
  4. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 188

    Kevin Pharis

    You may consider finding someone with an ultrasonic thickness gage... would be nice to know if this is a localized issue before making any decisions.

    If the defect turns out to be a “random” event, it could be as simple as a carefully placed pipe plug or crack pin...
     
    RidgeRunner and 39wagon like this.

  5. F-ONE
    Joined: Mar 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,828

    F-ONE
    Member
    from Alabama

    What do you have to loose?
    I do recommend you update your AAA.
    First hand …
    Long story I'll try to be brief....
    My father got ripped off with new 1977 55 Johnson outboard. The dealer farted stalled until the OMC warranty was up. It was a factory defect in the pistons.

    One of those pistons punched a hole in either the cylinder or the head. My father used JB weld. It was that or scrap the whole thing.
    That boat ran for years and years after that with no problem.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2021
    39wagon likes this.
  6. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 906

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    I have had good success using Original JB on some one off fabricated cooling system parts for an OT race rig that leaked a bit, my welding and brazing fab skills not being the greatest. The key to JB success on any jobs is making sure the surfaces are clean, clean, and cleaner. Beveling the edge of a small hole or grinding a crack to a V helps if there is enough material and space available.

    It does like to "run" before it sets up if the surface to be repaired isn't facing up at near horizontal. Like mentioned above a small plug or screw might be a good option to save pulling the engine to get the repair area facing up.

    Ed
     
    39wagon likes this.
  7. adam401
    Joined: Dec 27, 2007
    Posts: 2,455

    adam401
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The oil pan in my OT diesel pickup is JB welded right now. Rust pinholes. My experience is clean the area very well. Sand or grind the area to create a rough surface or tooth. Use the original JB weld not fast setting. Let cure for 24 hours. Ive done manybrepairs in high heat and oily conditions and all lasted for a good long time
     
    RidgeRunner and 39wagon like this.
  8. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 906

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    I have no experience with the High Temp Belzona epoxy so can't comment on it.

    Back in the '70's we experienced block rust through issues on the 660HP McIntosh & Seymour engines used in ALCO locomotive switchers. The carrier couldn't come up with a welding rod that would work well with whatever the blocks were cast of so we wound up grinding the affected areas reasonably smooth, making steel patches, homemade gaskets, and attaching them with small cap screws. Fix worked and the locomotives continued running in service for years until scrapped for other reasons.

    Ed
     
  9. 39wagon
    Joined: Dec 13, 2008
    Posts: 32

    39wagon
    Member

    Thanks for all the thoughts and ideas. Sounds like I'm not the only one that has run across this kind of problem before. I think that I'll mull the ideas over and do a little more research on the heat/water properties of JB Weld and Belzona and come up with a plan of attack. I'll let you know what I come up with as a solution and how it works out. Again, thanks for the help.
     
  10. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 2,417

    gene-koning
    Member

    The JB Weld works if:
    1) You get the area clean enough.
    2) You make sure you get the entire area that is suspect covered.
    3) You allow the JB Weld 24 hours to fully cure before you put any liquid against it.
    4) There isn't a lot of pressure in the cooling system.
    5) The JB Weld isn't subjected to high stress (twisting/flexing).
    It actually works quite well for sealing stuff that isn't under a lot of pressure or stress. Gene
     
    39wagon likes this.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.