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Folks Of Interest any interest in 3D printing

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by topher5150, Feb 9, 2020.

  1. topher5150
    Joined: Feb 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,071

    topher5150
    Member

    I've been entertaining the getting a 3D printer and doing some design and part making. I have AutoDesk Inventor on my laptop already and a background in CAD and design. I'm not going to limit my self to just car parts, but also prototyping, model car parts etc....Right now I'm putting my feelers out to see what market there is for this kind of service.
     
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  2. belair
    Joined: Jul 10, 2006
    Posts: 8,533

    belair
    Member

    Check out the thread on the guy making 35/36 Ford waterfalls
     
  3. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,889

    squirrel
    Member

    There's been discussion here about it.

    The funny thing is, I still haven't ever made a 3d printed part. My kids and brother have, but not me. Maybe it's because I mess with old cars? There just always seems to be a "better" way to do what I want to do, than to have to use a computer to make it.
     
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  4. larry k
    Joined: Feb 23, 2009
    Posts: 320

    larry k
    Member

    That's the way we built hot rods in the old days !!! " right " ?
     
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  5. whtbaron
    Joined: Sep 12, 2012
    Posts: 570

    whtbaron
    Member
    from manitoba

    I've been watching a guy use one on a speedster forum and I have to say it's impressive. It might not be what you want for an actual part, but for making the blank for a plaster mold for casting it's great. He also makes the plastic part before he starts machining one since he can actually try it for fit before he starts milling. He says it saves him hours of machine time and fewer castoffs since he doesn't have to make Plan B out of steel or aluminum. Is it the traditional way? No, but most of us aren't painting our cars in cellulose lacquer either.
     
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  6. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,671

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have access to commercial-grade 3D printers at work.

    I can print in PLA, pull a mold, and cast any aluminum part that you can imagine. Not cheap, though.

    Mostly we use them for trim pieces in prototypes, or proofs, before machining.
     
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  7. Ziggster
    Joined: Aug 27, 2018
    Posts: 585

    Ziggster
    Member

    There is definitely a market for the right part(s). I would concentrate on small parts no longer available. A few years ago, a guy at work retired, and took it up. I was amazed at what he was creating in a short time.
     
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  8. southcross2631
    Joined: Jan 20, 2013
    Posts: 4,019

    southcross2631
    Member

    I have a 100 dollar bill that you can make me a pickup truck load of.
     
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  9. I also have access to a few at work and some guys I work with have used it for misc. prototype parts prior to paying for tooling on production parts to check fit and function. I have yet to think of any hot rod parts I need from it, but I’m sure there could be some. A couple guys I work with bought smaller ones and are making a few gun-related parts they are selling which quickly paid for the investment.
     
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  10. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 27,544

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'd say that it is all about what you are used to using and how far your imagination runs.
    Some of us scavenge up pieces of MFD board and then shape prototype piece out of it before figuring out how we are going to make it out of metal. Some guys just whittle it out of metal and toss the rejects in the scrap bin and now some will do a cad program and 3D print the piece and go out and test fit it and then either machine it out of metal or in some cases use the printed piece.
    Guys tend to scoff but wouldn't a hot rodder right after WWII have used the latest and trickest tools he could get his hands on if he had them available rather than using basic tools. We as rodders have always taken advantage of what we had access to to build or hot rods. That might have meant using your granddad's belt driven drill press rather than a 1/4 inch electric drill or doing some favors for the guy with the gas station down the street so you could use his hoist when he wasn't busy with it rather than rolling around in the dirt in your driveway.
     
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  11. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 1,732

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    Make me a 1/8 scale 324 Olds Rocket please.....
     
  12. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,986

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    Doesn't 3D printing cost more to make the part than buying it?
     
  13. razoo lew
    Joined: Apr 11, 2017
    Posts: 416

    razoo lew
    Member
    from Calgary

    Possibly. If the part that you want is available, otherwise, not an issue.
     
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  14. topher5150
    Joined: Feb 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,071

    topher5150
    Member

    Here's a couple of examples of some solid models that I put together from some old drawings that I found online.
    Capture.JPG Capture2.JPG
     
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  15. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,200

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    I would need the rest of the parts that go with your bottom picture , topher5150 . :D
     
  16. 327Eric
    Joined: May 9, 2008
    Posts: 1,514

    327Eric
    Member
    from Diablo Ca.

    I would like to know if it is economical to do, or have done. I have a 51 Henry J marker light I would like to replace, but it is not reproduced.
     
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  17. Ziggster
    Joined: Aug 27, 2018
    Posts: 585

    Ziggster
    Member

    I started using AutoDesk/Fusion 360 a year or so ago, and was amazed at how easy it was to use. There are some good vids on YT to get you started. I just wish I had the time to pursue it further.
     
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  18. topher5150
    Joined: Feb 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,071

    topher5150
    Member

    I was thinking about doing large scale model parts too.

    Now I just need to figure out rates
    Sent from my moto z4 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  19. Rusty Heaps
    Joined: May 19, 2011
    Posts: 612

    Rusty Heaps
    Member

    Plenty of market for obsolete tail lights and marker lights. When Ya Gotta Have Em, You Gotta Have Em!
     
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  20. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 1,732

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    I need some 1/8 scale ‘47 Chevy tail lights pleeze..... AD3E423A-2E3B-4036-B2E4-B642E0B21F2B.png
     
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  21. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,459

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    I'm thinking it might be nice to make intake manifolds...........
     
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  22. Beanscoot
    Joined: May 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,599

    Beanscoot
    Member

    I agree that it's great for making moulds, but actual parts like plastic tail lights can't be made from what I've seen.
    The parts produced are kind of porous and translucent, not clear and sharply defined. Of course the technology continually improves.

    Years ago I read how Jay Leno had plastic patterns made for an intricate steam car engine part which were then used to cast a part in iron. The car had been "waiting" for this obsolete part for a century or so, so it was quite exciting to get the new casting and have the old beast run again.
     
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  23. BigChief
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 2,079

    BigChief
    Member

    It's a market that is getting easier to get into and at the same time much more competitive. You have to have a big and accurate printer that is able to shoot many different materials if your going to do work for John Q Public....the home based printers are OK to play with but you're going to have a pretty good investment in one that will put out good parts quickly.

    We have a couple large printers at work for our prototypes, proof of concept designs, etc.

    For more precise parts, production work and metal (we do a lot of 316 stainless) we use these guys.

    https://www.protolabs.com/services/3d-printing/

    It takes a lot of time to make one part with a middle of the road printer....hours....a day sometimes with the home grade equipment.

    My son has one he picked up for a few hundred bucks and is playing around with it. Can do trim parts, doo dads and odd ball items that dont need to be strong or super pretty. The materials have their limitations....but if you work within them the parts do OK.

    Get one....play with it and test it out see what you can do and see who wants to pay cash for your time and work.....ita the American way!







    Sent from my SM-G950U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  24. Spoiler-not a car part. My son was in Key West with his buds (bachelor party) and they had miniature models of themselves made with a 360 degree camera system and then laser printed. Wife's first view when he sent a picture of them-she didn't get it. "Why are they just standing there?" not realizing it was the 4" high rendition of them right down to the matching Hawian (sp) shirts. Detail was fantastic!
     
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  25. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 435

    cfmvw
    Member

    I got into Solid works and 3D printing in college. I work for the Navy as a machinist, but there are some opportunities on the horizon to get into 3D printing. Needless to say, I've been networking like crazy to position myself for that, especially as they are getting a 3D metal printer soon :)
     
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  26. BigChief
    Joined: Jan 14, 2003
    Posts: 2,079

    BigChief
    Member

    My son is printing a flathead.... 22139.jpeg

    Sent from my SM-G950U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  27. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,459

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Let me qualify my opinion with a statement that I have absolutely no experience with these printers.
    On an aviation website a fellow was lauding the benefits of 3D printing and how he was going to use computers to cut all the precison tubing lengths and angles to build a fuselage from chromemoly tubing......rather than the time consuming practice of cutting and fitting each tube by hand.
    He was going to make plastic collets and fixtures to hold the tubing while attempting to machine the steel tubing with a high speed computer controlled router spinning at 10,000/24,000 rpms making many multiple small cuts.
    Several other guys were into the printing thing and as it went on, it turned out that for a home hobbiest, it was going to be quite an involved process and a fair amount of financial outlay. Anyway, last time I looked he had made a lot of plastic stuff to hold the tubing and programmed cuts, but after 6 months he hasn't displayed any completed parts.
    Others that know more about this process should chime in here and tell us if there are easier ways to learn how to do all thats required to be proficient/quick at getting this stuff to fruition. From what I saw, it required an extensive investment in time to learn the CAD programming and then design and program even reasonably simple parts. Its like having an additional full time hobby that overides your real hobby.
    I know there are some people that have the inclination to pursue this stuff and do well and enjoy doing it. Its probably cheaper to have one of those people make what you want than to try to do it yourself.

    Note: As for the technology needed to cut air plane tubing accurately, thats a technology that is doable with the right equipment.....and there is at least one company that does so. The problem with the hobby guy I mentioned was that he wanted to locate and restrain the metal tubing with plastic holders mounted to plywood......and do it with a cutter that had to spin way too fast because he was going to use an underpowered router. I think all he will accomplish is to dull a lot of router bits and workharden the metal. I could be wrong, but so far he hasn't produced anything. So whatever your goal might be, realize that learning and applying this technology will be a long term learning curve. ;)
     
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