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Anvils, do you have one - or more?

Discussion in 'The Antiquated' started by HOTRODPRIMER, Apr 28, 2019.

  1. I don't know the age of this one but I have had it for many a year, it spent it's life beside the barn, this is one tool that I have pounded on for years. HRP

    It's a HAY-BUDDEN.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    0f86e55b1e96e8297c5a08c50cee6d03.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
  2. Roothawg
    Joined: Mar 14, 2001
    Posts: 18,676

    Roothawg
    Member

    Anvils bring crazy money around here. I have one, but I don't know who made it.
     
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  3. BuckeyeBuicks
    Joined: Jan 4, 2010
    Posts: 1,568

    BuckeyeBuicks
    Member
    from ohio

    I have a small one that was my Grandpa Johns. I bid on a larger one at an auction a while back, when it got to $450.00 I got afraid the other guy would dump it on me so I dumped it on him. I decided I didn't need it THAT bad!
     
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  4. WB69
    Joined: Dec 7, 2008
    Posts: 782

    WB69
    Member

    Yes, passed from my Grandfather to my Dad, now to me. Pounded on it growing up in Dad's shop and now I pound on it in my shop. Happy to have it!!
     
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  5. Slick34
    Joined: Jan 22, 2016
    Posts: 9

    Slick34

    I have never had a anvil but I do have a 12 in long piece of a railroad track that my uncle gave me a long time ago. Have used this for beating on when needed. Sure has come in handy!
     
  6. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    I have 2 Hay Budden anvils. I consider the Hay Budden anvils to be some of the best anvils made in days of yore. The reason is that the newer ones had 1/3rd of tool steel on the top of the anvil, where other English anvils such as Peter Wrights only had a 9/16" tool steel plate on top. The older HBs used a tool steel plate also, but thicker than the competition. This change took effect around the turn of the 20th century, so right around 1900. A better date on that would be in Postman's book.

    This is a 160 lb. Hay Budden with 1/3rd tool steel on top. You can see the line right around the top of the chains...It was only the more recent anvils that HB made which had 1/3rd of tool steel for the top.

    knife-sitting-on-coil.jpg

    Here's some small pics of the near pristine Hay Budden 128 lb. I have. This is one of the cleanest anvils I've ever seen. I don't use it, I mostly use the 160 lb. anvil when I forge. This is an older HB which only had a tool steel plate on top.

    EDIT: holy crap batman, here's a similar anvil which sold on ebay for $850 for a 128# Hay Budden. https://www.ebay.com/itm/128-lb-HAY-BUDDEN-BLACKSMITH-ANVIL-Forge-Iron-Knifemaker-/123737805548

    hay-budden-128-04.jpg hay-budden-128-01.jpg hay-budden-128-02.jpg

    I also have a couple smaller anvils, here's a sawmaker's anvil which I use when working on handsaws.

    sm-10-front.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
  7. Someone should reproduce anvils with traditional methods.
    They bring stupid money and always have a deficit to repair or live with.
     
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  8. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    Actually there have been a few people that do that, and in Oakland, CA at The Crucible they did produce some solid tool steel anvils, AFAIK.

    For a modern "traditional style anvil", the Peddinghaus are tough to beat...for lack of a better analogy...;) Many modern smiths already use them. They're a double horn anvil.

    That actually reminds me that if you're looking for a decent used anvil, a Farrier anvil is much less desirable for a Blacksmith. A Farrier anvil is typical a bit narrower with some features that are desirable for shaping horseshoes. I know it's commonly accepted that Farriers are Blacksmiths, but there is very little forging done when shoeing horses. The modern shoes are pre-shaped and require very little when being fitted to a hoof.

    What most people think of as a Blacksmith's anvil has a square heel on the rear of the top with hardy and pritchel holes in them and a large horn on the front.

    Hard to find good anvils, I believe mainly because Blacksmithin' is a dying art, it's mostly old curmudgeons like me that are even interested in the art, but that modern technologies such as drop forge products are partially what has obsoleted them.
     
  9. BamaMav
    Joined: Jun 19, 2011
    Posts: 3,231

    BamaMav
    Member
    from Berry, AL

    Never owned one, but I used to have a 2' end of a rail road switch rail. It was rounded and curved on one end, and square cut on the other. Some damn scrapper decided he needed it worse than I did and lifted it while I was gone one day. It was sitting outside my now gone old wooden barn shop building, I should have set it back inside after I used it.

    I've got a 8' length of straight rail I've been thinking about trying to make another with. Been looking at it for 30 years now and still haven't figured a easy way to cut off a couple of feet long piece and round an end without a hell of a lot of grinding.
     
  10. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 25,783

    The37Kid
    Member

    There is one on Main Street that holds an optometrist sign, I should ask if there is a story behind it. Bob
     
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  11. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    Wouldn't take that long with a hack saw...:rolleyes:
     
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  12. 3W JOHN
    Joined: Oct 8, 2015
    Posts: 388

    3W JOHN
    Member

    I have a anvil with the horn broken off.
     
    HOTRODPRIMER likes this.
  13. John, the popular belief is that Sherman's troops broke the horns off anvils on his march to the sea, there may be some truth to the story because I have seen a lot of anvils around Georgia & South Carolina with broken horns.

    My pal Rene' has on also. HRP
     
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  14. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 25,783

    The37Kid
    Member

    Thanks, I always enjoy learning a bit of history. The Sherman anvils stamped Made in China are fakes.

    Bob
     
  15. Gastrap
    Joined: Apr 8, 2012
    Posts: 81

    Gastrap
    Member
    from Tama, Iowa

    I have this '26 Trenton.
    Trenton.jpg
     
  16. There’s one at the local hardware store. Guy won’t sell it “because the girls use it”. I said really?? He says Yep they stand on it to see over the counters.
    I told him that’s no kind of life for an anvil,,, a step stool ,,,if it were in my shop it would be singing every day.
     
  17. Blacksmithing is trendy right now. Every hipster wants to be a bladesmith these days. There are guys like this popping up all over the place...

    http://www.torontoblacksmith.com/

    I have no idea what a 25 year-old college student needs with a handmade axe or whatever, but there's lot's of blacksmithing/forging going on. I guess I won't complain about young people learning to use their hands.

    I've only got 2 railroad track anvils. One my father made and one a friend's father made, both in the 1950s.
     
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  18. Roger O'Dell
    Joined: Jan 21, 2008
    Posts: 1,035

    Roger O'Dell
    Member

  19. Cool 33
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 37

    Cool 33
    Member

    I have a Peter Wright that I inherited from my dad. But I have friend who has 80 or more from 3" long to 5 foot long and weigh up to 1000 lbs or more. Here is a picture of some of them. IMG956401.jpg
     
  20. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 25,783

    The37Kid
    Member

    The 1932 Ford Grille collector Anvils, does he take them to shows like the safe collector that has a display at the local Kent show? :confused:

    Bob
     
  21. Cool 33
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 37

    Cool 33
    Member

    If you are addressing those I posted today, I don't think so. Too many and too heavy. They are located in Dallas, Texas.
     
  22. Man, it's no wonder the rest of us can't find a decent one :D
     
  23. badgascoupe
    Joined: Jul 22, 2011
    Posts: 115

    badgascoupe
    Member

    Lots of ads to buy old tools and anvils in my area, seems like some are shady dudes.Have 3 and not selling any of them.
     
  24. losthubcap
    Joined: Jul 23, 2010
    Posts: 187

    losthubcap
    Member
    from Upstate NY

    Here's mine, mounted on an old axle housing.
     

    Attached Files:

  25. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 3,425

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    I've wanted one, but I don't wanna pay through the nose. My great-grandfather or maybe it was his father, was farrier to the King of Sweden if I remember family history right. So blacksmithing is part of my background, kinda. He moved to Minnesota, his fingers must have been the size of bratwurst if his wedding band is any guide. Still have his pocket watch, a nickle-plated Elgin, not too fancy, no sir. A real anvil on a big American Elm stump, every shop should have one, I'm thinkin'.
     
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  26. chevy57dude
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 4,939

    chevy57dude
    Member

    Question for those who know -
    Should an anvil ''ring'' when hit with a hammer? Yesterday while looking at an electrical issue, I spotted an anvil in a basement. Owner is a character. He told me the anvil is dead, won't ring when struck.
    $40 and I have to carry it out. I didn't jump on it. It's not going anywhere.
    Opinions, please!
     
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  27. SS327
    Joined: Sep 11, 2017
    Posts: 132

    SS327

    No ring usually means a crack. Probably from hitting it with a hammer. :confused:


    Denny
     
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  28. badgascoupe
    Joined: Jul 22, 2011
    Posts: 115

    badgascoupe
    Member

    Yes it should ring,a cheap cast iron one might not. You want to take a 1/2" ball bearing and drop it onto the top it should bounce back almost as high as where you dropped it from. A good anvil has bounce in it,when you strike it your hammer should feel like its bouncing back up.( better bounce will save your shoulder )
     

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