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Hot Rods Am I the only one who gets a tightened sphincter when using those "modern lift plates"?.........

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 6sally6, Jan 11, 2020.

  1. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 10,961

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Head bolts, maybe! Among their many shortcomings, “Flattys” are heavy little suckers.....outweigh SBC and SBF .....and weigh as much as several larger OHV engines........;)

    Ray
     
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  2. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,907

    brigrat
    Member
    from Wa.St.

    As a young kid I made a plate with the 4 bolts, I worried more about the tree limb than the plate..............................................
     
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  3. triumph 1
    Joined: Feb 9, 2011
    Posts: 371

    triumph 1
    Member

    I made my own out of 1/4” steel plate 20+ years ago and have never had any issues using it.
    I always use at least grade 5 fasteners and never get under anything that’s lifted by hydraulics w/o a safe mechanical lock.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  4. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 10,961

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Good call.....but what interests me more is your avatar......care to PM me that photo? I swear I will not display it on the HAMB.....but it would make great ‘wallpaper’ on my computer screen...:)

    Ray
     
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  5. bchctybob
    Joined: Sep 18, 2011
    Posts: 1,847

    bchctybob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I don’t own one but under most circumstances it seems fine. I probably wouldn’t try to lift my 392 with one, especially with the trans. I’ve always used a length of chain and 3/8 or 7/16 bolts somewhere on the engine and a commercial shackle. When I finally bought a real lifting device it was the adjustable four point type.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  6. I made an adjustable one, works well using bolts tightened into manifold mounting holes etc, have hauled out some Chevy 6's & 8's with trans, but I still tie a piece of seatbelt strap around it and through something (manifold, etc), because I have heard that the internal combustion engine doesn't like to bounce when it hits concrete.
     
  7. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 3,371

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    I think the scariest part is that you or anyone would think it is okay to be under a load . :eek: :oops: Work safe , be safe .
     
  8. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,350

    Boneyard51
    Member

    I was going to get a picture of mine to show off........never mind!






    Bones
     
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  9. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 12,863

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    I borrowed a friends' HF lift plate once, it got the job done but I was puckered up the whole time.
    I built this one for the aluminum engine in my roadster but I also have a (iron) 327 and 350 so the bases are covered, also note the ARP studs.
    Quoting someone I'm sure.
    "She's hell for stout"!
    20160118_092513.jpg



     
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  10. chevy57dude
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 5,168

    chevy57dude
    Member

    IMG_20180429_175147067.jpg
    Not questioning the safety margin of lift plates. I just won't do stuff that makes me uneasy. Leveler for this dude. Air rachet handy for quick adjustment.
     
  11. Hemiman 426
    Joined: Apr 7, 2011
    Posts: 524

    Hemiman 426
    Member
    from Tulsa, Ok.

    If you ever saw the Bootstrap Kits we used to change engines on the 767, DC-10 and A-300, you'd shake your head!
     
  12. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 7,250

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    I am going to be making a lifting device to install a 235 and attach it to where the rocker arm stands bolt,do not want chains scratching the fresh paint on the engine.
     
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  13. Nope, no freakin' way. I don't care what the engineering aspects of it are, I simply do not trust them.
     
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  14. scrappybunch
    Joined: Nov 16, 2011
    Posts: 285

    scrappybunch
    Member
    from nj

    I made a plate to pull LS engines. Only 2 8mm bolts used, alloy block or cast iron. Has yanked at least 50 engines with no problem. Besides, I never stand under anything held up with a cherry picker.
     
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  15. V8 Bob
    Joined: Feb 6, 2007
    Posts: 2,544

    V8 Bob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've used a vintage '60s lift plate on many heavys, like 460s, FEs, Ys etc with and without trannys, but only on cast iron intakes. The bolt strength is not a concern, it's lifting with an aluminum intake.
     
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  16. Wanderlust
    Joined: Oct 27, 2019
    Posts: 57

    Wanderlust

    Used one for the first time to r&r my 292 y block, it worked but the whole time the old hind brain is screamin nuh uh no freakin way, same goes for the old 3 wheeled engine stand, bobbin and weaving as I was tourqing the bolts, I swear it relaxed about 2” when the weight came off it.
     
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  17. ramblin dan
    Joined: Apr 16, 2018
    Posts: 1,794

    ramblin dan

    When I worked in a machine shop I went into overkill mode and fabricated one with half inch steel base with one inch thick welded bar of steel $(KGrHqNHJE!FDN6f+h5zBQ8y7)7fng~~60_57.jpg that ran the length of it and drilled and tapped 3/8 holes all the way down the length plate so I could screw in an eye bolt in any one of the holes for balance. But with this intake I'm putting on my project car engine I'll have to install the intake after installation of the block.
     
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  18. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,350

    Boneyard51
    Member

    All this talk about getting under something hung up..... I just assumed everyone knew that! I guess I was blessed with a good teacher. My Dad , from my earliest memories, told me to never get under any thing hanging! Always use jack stands, ( we used big wooden blocks back then) , because you never know when something mechanical will fail. That advice served me well. I have had a few things drop , in the thousands of things I’ve lifted, over the years for various reasons and I’m still here! Safety first, as my three fingered shop teacher used to tell me!






    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
  19. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 649

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    I modified a Harbor Freight engine tilter. It lets you get attachment points that are spread further apart and keep from bending things attached to the engine. Engine stays level side to side but can still be tilted. It also works well for pulling pick up beds of your frame and even for lifting cabs and bodies. Works a lot better than the basic tilter.

    Engine Tilter 5x.JPG

    Sept 11 064.JPG
     
  20. partsdawg
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 2,531

    partsdawg
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Minnesota

    More of a baling wire and twine guy myself.
     
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  21. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,350

    Boneyard51
    Member

    That is like a “ spreader bar” used in industry. It’s the best way to lift most any bulky or heavy object. I built one to lift the 2000 lbs beds I used to install on new trucks and another one to lift the zero turn mowers I used to sell. Once you use a properly designed spreader bar, you will never use anything else! The reason the carb plate is so popular is because it’s quick and easy! The spreader bars take a little time, but give better performance.


    ekimmerbo , you have a nice shop and excellent fab skills. I bet your shop is a pleasure to work in!



    Bones
     
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  22. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 649

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Here are some pictures from years ago showing the value of an engine tilter when performing an engine swap. I like to set the engine and transmission in place using a cobbled up temporary trans mount.to center the trans in the frame..
    Then I take the tilter loose and mount it sideways on the engine. At the time I had a cherry picker. Now I have an overhead crane, but it still works the same way. The car needs to be on stands that won't interfere with the cherry picker being moved about. Anyway, the tilter is turned sideways and the cherry picker is inserted from the side of the vehicle. You now have control of the engines positioning in all three axis. The temp trans mount holds the trans on center and :
    1. As you push the cherry picker from left to right you can center the engine in the frame.
    2. By raising and lowering the cherry picker you can find the best angle for the engine/trans.
    3. By adjusting the tilter you can level the valve covers side to side.
    Once the engine is "exactly" where you want, cobble up a simple angle iron bracket that you can bolt to the heads and tack weld to the frame. Now the engine is stabilized exactly where you want, remove the cherry picker and start making mounts for the engine. No more jambing wood under each side and having it shift as you work.
    It works really well.

    centering.jpg
    Push.jpg
    angle.jpg
    level.jpg
    temp mount.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
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  23. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 649

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    I don't know about the fab "skill" but I find that if I keep at it I can usually find a way to make things easier on future projects. I appreciate the compliment. My goal is to try to "inspire" other builders to create things in their shop and their mind so they can continue building as they get older. I found that often I had to accomplish tasks without anyone to help and by building tools that allowed that, I could usually find a way to do anything. These days I seem to spend too much time on the computer and need to get back out in the shop. Here is one of my favorite cartoons.
    Frog Never Give Up Frog.jpg Thanks again for the compliment! ;)
     
  24. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,350

    Boneyard51
    Member

    CEB8D749-B699-48CE-AB33-EE76CADF522C.jpeg 87654A78-B398-4C20-940A-C9E61C619A73.jpeg
    I agree a nice shop with good tools, organized, makes any job more pleasurable. When I was a youngan , I had to do things by myself, as I had no brothers and lived way out in the country. My closet friend was 3/4 miles away. So I learned how to make tools/ machines work for me to get things done that would normally take two or more people. Might take me a little while to get it done that way, but I did it! This skill has served me well all my life.
    I have used this knowledge in retrieving stuck vehicles. Many times I have been requested to come get a stuck vehicle way back in the sticks, with my 1/4 ton vehicle . One time I had to travel 150 miles to do the job. Sometimes the owner of the stuck equipment will tell me “ I don’t think you brought enough truck!” I tell them “we’ll see!”. I have never left any one in the woods!
    Pic is some of the equipment I use.


    I kept that picture on the wall of my fire dept shop for years! The other pic I had was a line of mice lined up behind a mouse with his head in a trap! These two pics inspired me enough to make 33 years on the job!





    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
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  25. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 649

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

     
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  26. Doublepumper
    Joined: Jun 26, 2016
    Posts: 512

    Doublepumper
    Member

    I really like the modified engine tilter using spreader bars and am going to build one similar. Thinking it'll be especially useful (convenient and safer) for pulling and installing engines with transmissions attached. Lift plates are just too scary for me.
     
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  27. Nostrebor
    Joined: Jun 25, 2014
    Posts: 816

    Nostrebor
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've lifted a lot of engines with a manifold lift plate. In my college years I ran a quick number on the tensile strength of the bolts for these. They have plenty of capacity, even at a 4-1 safety factor. so does a manifold in typical cases.

    I also never, ever get my body parts under a loaded crane or picking device of any type without understanding of failsafes and an escape plan, but that is a product of 30+ years in a plant around boom cranes that routinely pick 30kips or better. I'm always looking up to see which way the boom tip will go.:D
     
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  28. RmK57
    Joined: Dec 31, 2008
    Posts: 1,210

    RmK57
    Member

    Same here. Had my 460 in and out a few times with one. Fully dressed 460 has to weigh well over 650 pounds to even with a aluminum intake and maybe another 250 with the C6.
     
  29. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,350

    Boneyard51
    Member

    I went out a dug out my intake pad, you can see by the cob webs, I haven’t used it in a while. Not that I haven’t changed a few engines lately, but they were at the race car shop, and my friend has several of those thin plates.
    Maybe some one here could figure how much more stress torquing the bolts to 30 ft/ lbs vs just snugging them down. It’s beyond my knowledge.






    Bones 2D9103F1-EDBC-406A-8DEA-929A3A56CB57.jpeg
     
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  30. big john d
    Joined: Nov 24, 2011
    Posts: 117

    big john d
    Member
    from ma

    i bought one and never used it until i saw a boss 429 hanging from one with a top loader on it tilted enough to get it into an original boss 429
     
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