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Am I crazy? I want a big truck. How to move big grain truck from MN to WI

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rustyironman, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. I think that is light enough to legally flat tow. (under 10,000 lbs) get yourself a good strong tow bar and a dually pick-up. Drive over to Minnesota, fill the pick-up box with sand for weight and control, hook on to that old Stude and pull it home. (slowly) You will have to decide which is worse money and time wise, the ferry, or the bridge. (no damn way I would take it through Chicago)
     
  2. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    well you know have the towing vehicle offer . now to find a trailer

    I wouldn't drive this thing in its present condition across wisconsin as there state troopers are pretty nasty( and minnesotas are worse ) when it comes to truck inspections and that one is calling out for one .farm truck or not , if they deam it unroadworthy its getting towed and you get a fine . if you knew a truck driver with a flatbed/lowboy thats going that way with no backhaul you sometimes can get a real cheap rate.

    . do not think about a tow dolly or u haul as mentioned or even a tow bar as 6500 pounds is needing brakes and will push hard . you need a H-d trailer ..
     
  3. flying53gmc
    Joined: Mar 2, 2005
    Posts: 337

    flying53gmc
    Member
    from M-boro, TN

    I know fixing it and driving it home sounds great, but that is not something you can just find parts for at auto zone. This is the bus I bought locally and brought home. 2 speed rear axle, inline six, hydrovac, all that crap. I had to search all over to find wheel cylinders and hydro parts, have shoes relined, special order brake springs that were broken, etc. Plus you might have widow maker wheels and need tires. NOT something some tire shop on the side of the road is going to do. And a stude is not near as easy to find parts for as a chevy. And some on here are right, mine screams at 45 mph. Trailer it on an excavating equipment trailer.
     

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  4. flying53gmc
    Joined: Mar 2, 2005
    Posts: 337

    flying53gmc
    Member
    from M-boro, TN

    a trailer like this
     

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  5. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    I'm not aware of any toll roads in Minnesota or Wisconsin.
     
  6. Chevy Gasser
    Joined: Jan 23, 2007
    Posts: 696

    Chevy Gasser
    Member

    Like Bobwop says, you are in farm country. Check with the local equipment dealers. You can get a good deal on a backhaul, money well spent, maybe the truck owner will help with shipping.
     
  7. arturo7
    Joined: Jan 5, 2013
    Posts: 30

    arturo7
    Member

    I love the big trucks. Wish I had a reason to own one.


    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  8. I am about 20 miles from Morgan...Morgan to Manitowac is a pretty long poke (400 plus miles) in an old truck but there are great two lanes and small towns along the way where the drive would not be too bad. It's also pretty damn flat. I could give you some tips on routes that would
    get you across MN without too much traffic.

    I can recommend a repair shop 20 miles away pretty much a straight shot East on a county road black top that would probably do the work. He's not a hot-rodder but he is an ex-drag racer and runs a good honest business. It'd be good to inspect the hoses, fuel filters, belts, battery mounting, brakes hoses lines, shoes, MC etc. PM me if you need the name, I could check on a few others too.

    I'd offer up my shop...It would fit through my door, but It would not clear my 4 post lift.

    I just made a RT to Mackinaw Island...I decided not to use the Ferry when I checked the passenger vehicle rate and 4 adult passengers would be $400-$450 one way..

    I wish I had the space for an old Farm Truck...There cheap versatile and cool as hell (in my mind)
     
  9. 8flat
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    8flat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I bought this '56 Chevy 2.5ton grain truck about 300 miles away in Washington State. Needed to haul gravel to build a road into some land I bought, so thought I'd get a classic truck. My kids love it, wife hates it, haha. I grew up driving these old grain trucks on our ranch, they're cool in their own homely sorta way.

    I did all the research before hand to find out the weight, everything including the registration pointed at it being about 6,500lbs. So we headed out with my 18' flatbed with 7000lb axles, behind my 1/2ton Dodge hemi (65lbs of air in the rear bags).

    We showed up to load it and it was brutally obvious it was much heavier. "We're gonna need a bigger boat" came to mind..... we were literally laughing...like what the f**k do we do now? It had electrical problems, brake issues, carb was junk, and no tail lights so I couldn't drive it home without a shop to work on it for a day or two.

    It worked fine hauling it but I was very careful, especially on the mountain passes. Thank god for good trailer brakes, that's all I'm going to say.

    I pulled through the weigh station on the Idaho/Montana border, the guy looked at me funny and said I was pretty heavy. Turns out that truck is over 10,000 lbs. Yikes.
     

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  10. partsdawg
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 2,736

    partsdawg
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Minnesota

    Should you decide to go the fix it at a local shop route do your homework and have the needed parts in hand before you go.
    Check out the brake parts section of Studebaker International.Job would go faster and be more enjoyable if well planned.
     
  11. DrSweeneyRod
    Joined: Sep 1, 2012
    Posts: 204

    DrSweeneyRod
    Member
    from England

    Drive it with a load of other HAMB members and turn it in to an ultimate road trip :D
     
  12. norms30a
    Joined: Jul 17, 2008
    Posts: 564

    norms30a
    Member

    Just a note for anyone thinking about an older truck from about 57 through 72ish. The steel rims on trucks like V8flat has are 2 halve rims.

    Do not confuse these rims with the 2 piece rims with an outer locking ring with a screwdriver slot. The outer locking ring rim is much safer than than 2 halve rims. Properly cleaned and properly seated the outer locking ring rim is usually fairly safe....fairly safe that is.

    The 2 halve rims on V8flat's truck put the truck's weight on the inner half and the outer half separately causing the 2 halves to rub against each other and wear out.

    These rims can explode at any time, the front wheel would explode inward as would the inner dual on the rear.

    The outer dual on the rear would explode outward with deadly force.

    No tire shop will touch these rims, they can only be scrapped, which is too bad for us guys that like old trucks as different rims are tough to get sometimes.

    These rims were manufactured for abut 15 years or so, be careful. Didn't mean to hijack this thead.
     
  13. Barn Find
    Joined: Feb 2, 2013
    Posts: 2,320

    Barn Find
    Member
    from Missouri

    A friend towed this F6 with a 3/4-ton Dodge pickup.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. 32Tudor396
    Joined: Sep 14, 2010
    Posts: 181

    32Tudor396
    Member

    Drive down with the girl friends mileage maker get a dolly.Load the car on the dolly come home.Pack a spare coil,points,carb cleaner,couple cans of sea foam,oil,air tank,Extra fuel line,a couple plug wires and tools to pull the gas drain and clean gas tank if needed.Maybe a couple extra jugs if its to rusty.
    Have some fun,sounds like a good trip.
     
  15. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,091

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    this idea actually has some merit



     
  16. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,228

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    Partsdawg is correct. The Stude parts are not hard to find, if you know where to look, & now you do. PM me if you need more places to look. Having it fixed/checked over local is the best idea. 2nd is having it hauled, unless you can scare up the trailer needed. There may be issues w/the licensing tag due to its' weight (commercial). Back roads traveling would be best - & provide the most interest on the return trip. Look into a temp permit, or having the current owner getting it current-tagged. If it's a farm-use-tag, there may be issues due to miles away from farm, unless you have one that it's going to. Lots of help offered here. Take advantage of it. Have fun on the road trip. & do it long before any possibility of... *snow*... :D .

    Marcus...
     
  17. El Caballo
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 5,901

    El Caballo
    Member

    Who needs a ferry? You just need some imagination...
     

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  18. bobby_Socks
    Joined: Apr 12, 2006
    Posts: 938

    bobby_Socks
    Member
    from ǑǃƕǑ

    If you got it road worthy it might make for a nice road trip but to me a road trip in a truck of that size would not be enjoyable, I would like to see the back roads up and around that area but not from the seat of a truck like that one. Any thoughts on what the fuel cost be to drive that truck versus towing it. I would find a trailer or someone to haul it for me but that is just me. I hope you get it. Good luck with whatever you choose...
     
  19. krooser
    Joined: Jul 25, 2004
    Posts: 4,585

    krooser
    Member

    www.uship.com

    If the tires are Ok I'd drive it home... but I like adventure.
     
  20. KrisKustomPaint
    Joined: Apr 20, 2007
    Posts: 1,107

    KrisKustomPaint
    Member

    Do you guys have slow moving vehicle plates? In Missouri you can just slap a orange triangle on the back and drive anything under 45mph with no tags. What exactly is wrong with the brakes? It's not that hard to throw shoes on. Or if your desperate just replace the whole works, master cylinder, lines, wheel cylinders, ext. Shouldn't really need a torch, just some PB blaster and a breaker bar. If the owner won't let you work on his land just drive it down the road a bit and fix it. Suck it up, I drove a car for 3 days with a broken clutch cable, while I was waiting on the new one to show up.
     
  21. do you have a buddy or a son (that is old enough)? sounds like a great road trip, just go out there with a pick up with more tools you think you will need, all the parts fuel oil and stuff that has been mentioned. Take the back roads and have fun. I guess you can put some type of historic plate on the truck so you won't have to stop at weigh stations. Take turns driving the pick up and the big truck with the other driver.

    I know this is easy to say, but you must admit it would be a great story.

    on the other hand, towing it back could be done. someone else said remove the bed, load it up, remove tires. what would it weigh then? I pull a 20' boat that weighs 5000lbs with a F150. The trailer has/had hyd brakes but they are long gone now...rust
     
  22. 8flat
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    8flat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    True, split rims are dangerous. The PO had already swapped out these rims on my '56, but unfortunately he went with 22.5dia wheels, stock was 20" IIRC. Makes tires even more expensive...lol
     
  23. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,091

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    22.5 tires are much more common, and cheaper, than 20's
     
  24. 8flat
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    8flat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Huh, news to me. I'm sure having a hard time finding decent 10x22.5 heavy-lug traction tires (used). Brand new they are crazy money.
     
  25. bobwop
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 6,091

    bobwop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    go to your local truckstop and see how many rigs are running 20's. none.
     
  26. tractorguy
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 660

    tractorguy
    Member

    I've bought several trucks out West over the years and I have had them hauled back to Iowa. I would suggest going to www.yesterdaystractor.com. This is a vintage tractor website. They have a hauling page on the left side. You can search for guys needing loads and you can also list your truck needing to be hauled from Minn to Mich.
    These guys are usually good people who are tractor/truck hobbyists and guys who have their own dually/gooseneck trailers for farming and are buying/selling tractors.
    I have also hauled an old Dodge COE with no box on my 18ft. trailer with 1/2 ton Chev. I also sold a Chev COE with no box to a guy in Iowa and he picked it up with an 18ft. car trailer and Dodge 1/2 ton.
    I agree with BobWop that you really should think twice about hauling on a normal car trailer.......and absolutely no way on a car dolly. Be safe and have fun
     
  27. 8flat
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    8flat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Just called the local tire shop, (Jerry Noble Tire Factory):
    Hankook drive tire 9R20 = $470ea
    Hankook drive tire 9R22.5 = $560ea

    So I'd save $540 if I had 20" rims. (if I bought all 6 tires new, that is)
     
  28. NoSurf
    Joined: Jul 26, 2002
    Posts: 4,132

    NoSurf
    Member

    That's what my neighbor does.
     
  29. norms30a
    Joined: Jul 17, 2008
    Posts: 564

    norms30a
    Member

    Any Idea what those 22.5 rims with 6 bolt pattern came off of, are they 1 piece, or custom built? thanks.
     
  30. 8flat
    Joined: Apr 2, 2006
    Posts: 1,373

    8flat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have no idea. Pretty nice tubeless rims though, I'll PM some pics to you.
     

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