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Technical Always bring Baling Wire

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by squirrel, Aug 2, 2019.

  1. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 43,431

    squirrel
    Member

    Always bring some baling wire with you, you never know what you'll need it for.

    Drove the Hudson to Tucson today, and caught the tailpipe on a curb. Never expected this to happen! but I was prepared, so I made it back home (80 miles)

    Got a line on a replacement, will try to get it in the morning.


    baling01.jpg
    baling02.jpg
    baling03.jpg
     
    Montana1, scott27, 48fordnut and 25 others like this.
  2. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,790

    brigrat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Wa.St.

    And that proves that duct tape is not the answer for everything.................................
     
    Montana1, bob b., crashfarmer and 8 others like this.
  3. brad2v
    Joined: Jun 29, 2009
    Posts: 1,613

    brad2v
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Correct. duct tape, penetrating fluid, baling wire, and the primary sized wrenches. And some oil and water. Done
     
    Okie Pete likes this.
  4. I knew you don't like the sound of loud exhaust systems. But really? ;)
     
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  5. Oldb
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 156

    Oldb
    Member

    From an old farmers perspective, nice work. I especially like the twists. You must pack a nice set of pliers also.

    b
     
    Okie Pete, brad2v and jnaki like this.
  6. Bluestone
    Joined: Dec 25, 2016
    Posts: 40

    Bluestone

    "From Russia With Love" :D:D In russia many drivers uses dashcams because they have cheaper insurance cost if they do.
     
  7. Vimtage Iron
    Joined: Feb 28, 2010
    Posts: 496

    Vimtage Iron
    Member

    Damm, bailing wire looks to be getting thinner now a days, used to be a little thicker when I was threading a baler.
    Plastic wire ties won't work here either.
     
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  8. Jim, I am relieved that you got home ok, and have a line on a replacement.
    As a kid, I worked for a haywire logging outfit, and although it would have accurately described the behaviour of most of the guys working there, including myself, it was actually because it was amazing how many things got re-attached with haywire in a week. Driving on corduroy (log covered) roads is not kind to equipment.
    Ironically, I was driving my o/t car today, while waiting for parts for my primary transportation, and the front of the muffler dropped to the ground. I am really lucky that it didn't jill poke and damage the bodywork. I wasn't far from a friend's place, so I drove there with my head under the dash, so people wouldn't recognise me, and removed the offending piece using a cutoff wheel.
    Bob
     
  9. tub1
    Joined: May 29, 2010
    Posts: 399

    tub1
    Member
    from tasmania

    down here in Tasmania we call wire like that farmers friend
     
    Okie Pete likes this.
  10. Blacktop VooDoo
    Joined: Oct 28, 2011
    Posts: 122

    Blacktop VooDoo
    Member

    Yep, I have used baling wire to get me home before. I keep a small spool in the trunk. It has been exhaust related the past.
     
  11. Billybobdad
    Joined: Mar 12, 2008
    Posts: 885

    Billybobdad
    Member

    Don't forget the JB weld for the roadside gas tank repairs. (don't ask me how I know):eek:
     
    squirrel likes this.
  12. 2935ford
    Joined: Jan 6, 2006
    Posts: 3,142

    2935ford
    Member

    or Gorilla tape! :)
     
  13. BamaMav
    Joined: Jun 19, 2011
    Posts: 3,346

    BamaMav
    Member
    from Berry, AL

    Always heard that called baling wire, but never seen any hay baled with it, only twine.
    When I was in construction, I got a few rolls of tie wire that was used to tie rebar together. Used that stuff for years, need to pick up another roll somewhere....
     
  14. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 1,185

    51504bat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Broke an alternator bolt on my motorhome on the way to the Colorado River. Cinched it back in place with my belt and got there and back without any issues.
     
  15. j3harleys
    Joined: May 12, 2010
    Posts: 751

    j3harleys
    Member
    from colorado

    When we were young you could walk down any road and find a piece bailing wire it was in the ditches everywhere. Also The ranchers and farmers left pieces of it hanging on posts for repairs. Maybe that was just part of the area where I grew up.
     
  16. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 3,496

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Have used it since I was a kid. Our balers used wire too. Still use it and have a bit in every car just in case.
     
  17. Phillips
    Joined: Oct 26, 2010
    Posts: 1,281

    Phillips
    Member

    I’m just here to thank @squirrel for spelling baling wire correctly! Being a farm kid it hurts my brain to see it spelled ‘bailing’ wire.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
    48fordnut, alanp561, warbird1 and 4 others like this.
  18. greener200
    Joined: Jan 20, 2009
    Posts: 174

    greener200
    Member

    We call it Farmers welding rod ,my old man has some hangin in every barn ,always handy ,,,UH- OH ,,, I seem to have some too !
     
  19. This reminds me of the time my pal Spence did basically the same thing when we were in Myrtle Beach and a quick fix was needed to get home, he always had some baling wire in his tool pouch but needed a longer piece than he had, it's a little harder to work with but a old fashion cloths hanger will work in a pinch. HRP
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
  20. silent rick
    Joined: Nov 7, 2002
    Posts: 3,872

    silent rick
    Member

    i remember last minute, thinking what i should take on the maiden voyage of my 46, tossing a dozen coat hangers in the trunk along with other stuff. they're still there 17 years later.
     
    '51 Norm likes this.
  21. Casey Riley
    Joined: Jun 27, 2018
    Posts: 397

    Casey Riley

    The twisted loop method is extremely strong and the best part is that It draws the work pieces together as you twist to fasten. Very useful. [​IMG]
     
    48fordnut, WB69 and kidcampbell71 like this.
  22. I once owned a little blue 63 Rambler American with a vibration. One day the back end of the driveshaft fell down and I lost the U-joint caps/bearings....walked to a NAPA store for a new joint and hammered it in but the rear axle yoke was all hogged out--wouldn't hold the U-joint so I held the driveshaft in place and ran 1/2 roll of duct tape all over it. I had a Big Gulp soft drink and cut the bottom of the cup out, slit it down the side and made a "cast' to go over the taped up joint. I used baling wire to go around and around the whole mess. I was 50 miles from home and took back roads...made it about 10 miles from home when the entire repair came unraveled...had to call my wife to come for me.
     
    fourspeedwagon and Tim like this.
  23. Latigo
    Joined: Mar 24, 2014
    Posts: 587

    Latigo
    Member

    It’s been difficult to find real baling wire for several years. Could always pick up some as a kid working for farmers in Iowa. Then they switched to twine and the supply dried up. I don’t think my 55 Chev would have run without it.
     
  24. It's as close as your local Home Depot, I bought a 100 ft roll a couple of years ago and I honestly believe I paid less than 8 bucks. HRP
     
  25. Rebar tying wire is what I carry. Speaking of in-the-field emergency repairs, in the summer of 1969 my first car and daily driver was a '29 Model A coupe. I was on a city public works survey crew, and drove my A from site to site. When pulling up to a construction site shortly before lunch, I noticed I couldn't move the shifter. At lunch I pulled the trans tower to see what the problem was. It had dropped a pin from the front fork. Since all I had was a pair of pliers and a screwdriver, I looked around the area for something to substitute for the pin. Found a utility pole with lots of nails in it from people posting fliers. Several thicknesses and lengths, and I picked one, pried it loose, installed it in the trans, bent it well enough to hold. I think that nail is still doing its job today. Wish I had that coupe now.
     
  26. 56sedandelivery
    Joined: Nov 21, 2006
    Posts: 5,745

    56sedandelivery
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    There had to be a "crack" in that manifold to begin with I'd think. I always call the Jerry Rigged thing, "Bubble gum and baling wire". So, what's a Hudson exhaust manifold going for these days? I'm actually surprised you're not going to try and repair it. Must be getting old, just like the rest of us! Get after it! I am Butch/56sedandelivery.
     
  27. Johnboy34
    Joined: Jul 12, 2011
    Posts: 1,085

    Johnboy34
    Member
    from Seattle,Wa

    Other than this unexpected ordeal, how's the old Hudson running?

    Sent from my SM-G900V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  28. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,823

    BJR
    Member

    That casting must have already been cracked and about to break.
     
  29. Elcohaulic
    Joined: Dec 27, 2017
    Posts: 520

    Elcohaulic
    Member

    I have a small coil of #14 solid TW wire, I get two uses out of it..
     
  30. Elcohaulic
    Joined: Dec 27, 2017
    Posts: 520

    Elcohaulic
    Member

    That's it, legalize dope and booze, it doesn't hurt anything..
     

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