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Technical Adapt ANY Engine to ANY Transmission

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by atch, Mar 13, 2021.

  1. continentaljohn
    Joined: Jul 24, 2002
    Posts: 4,915

    continentaljohn
    Member

    @SEAAIRE354 I like to use the steel scatter shields for my adapters and usually can find them reasonably at the swaps. I also use the big industrial scrap years as they have drops and that also do some fabrication work for construction industries. I can get aluminum plate for better pricing and usually marked the type. I know some guys like the supermarket type metal markets but large steel company’s work with little guys and have better pricing and even shorts or damages goods..
    I just watched the videos and pretty cool and talented kid . As a tool and die maker I am hoping it was edited to speed things along. I dont think a dowl locating in the spindle / flywheel would give me enough confidence to machine or drill the item out. Indicating would give you give you the exact location and would also see how flat the flywheel is as well or the Milling machine for that fact. I am probably nitpicking but taking a few minutes to check everything is square and at zero.
    I’m old school and ran a Jigbore machine for dies so I pick a mill before lathe. Just add a indexing head and or rotary table and you have a lathe:D
     
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  2. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 2,003

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    First let me say that I enjoyed watching the videos and the fellow did a nice job presenting the information. There are a few things he did that I would NOT have done. That said, machining is the practice of taking available machines and tooling and finding a way to apply them to the job you want to do. Just because I would have done a few things differently is not meant as a slight at him, and does not mean what he did wouldn't work. So this is meant as objective suggestion rather than criticism.:)

    First, while what he did looks really nice, it is pretty expensive to buy large chunks of aluminum. Second, he had to make two adapters, which adds to that expense. If I were doing this, I would look at using an existing bellhousing that the transmission already fit. As ContinentalJohn mentioned, existing scattershields are a good starting point. I would have started by checking the length of the input shaft to see what distance I had to work with. A steel scattershield could easily have the engine mounting plate machined off and one with the correct pattern welded back in place. Its all about how much room you have to work with from the face of the trans to the block. Anyway used scattershields are often available cheaply. Also it might be possible to use a simple steel 3/16 plate between an aluminum housing and the engine face, which would be a much cheaper method. Just use an extended pilot bearing to add support for the input shaft.

    Using a scribed line to establish the location of the clutch mounting holes. I would not recommend that except as a last resort..........and drilling them by hand even though using a mill isn't good either. This will locate a rotating mass and NEEDS to be right. I don't know how many rpms he plans with the Jag engine, but a high reving V8 needs this done right.

    Aligning the transmission by using a bushing to lock the input shaft on center. The thing I would have done is to indicate the housing on the engine to see how far it was off location. Then I would have mounted it on a rotary table and corrected the hole location so it was concentric to the crank, but slightly larger. Then the aluminum adapter on the face of the trans would have a step cut in its face that slipped into the housing and aligned the trans properly.
    The bolts to attach the trans will be inserted into holes that are larger than the bolts, the trans can be moved around even though the holes are in the correct location. Whenever the trans is installed from underneath the car at a later date, there is nothing that keeps it in correct alignment, and the bushing he used cannot be used at that time.Any time an adapter is made, it should have the mounting hole in the bellhousing concentric with the crankshaft, and the trans or trans adapter/spacer should fit closely in that hole. That allows removal and reinstallation of the trans without changing alignment. Simply bolting a flat face to a flat face does not insure correct alignment. Chevy builders found this out when they used truck bellhousings and found the center hole in the bellhousing was larger than the ones used on cars.


    Good point and I agree with you.


    Indicating is ALWAYS the best way. Having done layout work as a machinist and an inspector, we both know that there is room for error in that method. There is room for error in all methods, but more likely with layout. How many times have I centerpunched a layout line and it wasn't exactly where I wanted it. Kazillionso_O

    Nope, absolutely not. It takes a while to understand when really precise measurement has to be used and when semi-precise will suffice. You are simply pointing out that when precision does matter, there are better ways to attain it. So again, I agree with you. (Not about nitpicking, but what you said):D
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2021
  3. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,500

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  4. Truckedup
    Joined: Jul 25, 2006
    Posts: 4,136

    Truckedup
    Member

     
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  5. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 5,035

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Oh...I was talking about Fords! Lol:D








    Bones
     
  6. TRENDZ
    Joined: Oct 16, 2018
    Posts: 310

    TRENDZ

    8347DE8D-6105-4B21-AB38-1B54EC360332.jpeg I never updated this. Here is a “mostly” finished adapter for early hemi to lakewood scattershield meant for small block mopar.
    Done on a manual bridgport with a rotary table. Included side engine mount area. 90373037-5374-4E60-BB31-776701C6E091.jpeg
     
  7. Beanscoot
    Joined: May 14, 2008
    Posts: 2,053

    Beanscoot
    Member

    Most impressive manual machining!
     
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  8. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,500

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nice work!
     
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  9. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 9,508

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I’ve put quite a few Lakewood and now Quick-Time housings on. The first thing I do is check with stock dowels. If off over .005” I take them out, set it where I want at .000” to .001” and drill my own. Usually 1/8” due available space. Anything can be done. The most important this doing correct, check 2 time before cutting as my dad said..
     
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  10. rod1
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 924

    rod1
    Member

    Tman likes this.
  11. TRENDZ
    Joined: Oct 16, 2018
    Posts: 310

    TRENDZ

    Agreed. That’s my “almost finished” comment.
    The block to adapter is done and fitted, but the dowels for the scattersheild wont be drilled until I zero the location.
     
  12. continentaljohn
    Joined: Jul 24, 2002
    Posts: 4,915

    continentaljohn
    Member

    Awesome work and please share more pictures. What size is your rotary table thanks

     
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  13. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 7,236

    19Fordy
    Member

    Considering our nation's high schools are doing away with
    industrial arts classes, it's great to see that there are still talented folks who know who to
    machine and fabricate creatively to solve problems.
     
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  14. TRENDZ
    Joined: Oct 16, 2018
    Posts: 310

    TRENDZ

    The rotary table was from a high school equipment auction. At least it didn’t go to scrap. $140.00 with minimal use.
    14” diameter. Very heavy!
     
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  15. engine138
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 1,954

    engine138
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Commack NY

    This guy has some real talent I'm surprised no one has scooped him up great job
     
  16. continentaljohn
    Joined: Jul 24, 2002
    Posts: 4,915

    continentaljohn
    Member

    What’s interesting is the local high schools just recently invested into shop equipment again. They sold the machines off years ago but with the shortage of machinists/toolmakers
    /mold makers they got new stuff including a CNC machine. I think its awesome and have been giving some of my old tools Mic,calipers and other gauges to the kid down the street in the shop class..

    Thank you and 14 incher is a great size and you can make some cool stuff. I have a 12 inch and comes in handy but 14 would be better lol
     
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  17. ROBRAM
    Joined: May 4, 2013
    Posts: 51

    ROBRAM
    Member

    Regardless of what kind of tools and equipment he has access to, it's refreshing to see a young man out in the shop
    putting out the effort rather than just lying on the couch playing video games.
     
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  18. TRENDZ
    Joined: Oct 16, 2018
    Posts: 310

    TRENDZ

    Young may be a stretch.... 53
    All this high school talk may have mislead you.
    In the last 10-15 years, the public schools here pretty much decimated the idea of shop class. A lot of machines went to scrap. In that time range you could get very nice used school shop equipment for nearly nothing.
    Im in Milwaukee. We use to be known as the world’s machine shop.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2021
  19. SEAAIRE354
    Joined: Sep 7, 2015
    Posts: 313

    SEAAIRE354
    Member

    Trendz that is a beautiful piece. And the fact that there is no industrial arts classes in school now ridiculous. I have people that I work with that have that have zero ability to figure some of the most basic stuff out. And the majority don’t care to learn if I try to teach them. And don’t get me started on common sense.
     
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  20. jetnow1
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Posts: 1,835

    jetnow1
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from CT
    1. A-D Truckers

    My nephew was close to finishing his masters degree when he realized he was not really enjoying his work. He took a one year course on CNC machining, graduated first in his class and was hired upon graduation by Pratt and Whitney.
    Makes good money, has never been so happy is working 7 days a week and loving it.
     
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