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Folks Of Interest acetone and turpintine?? Help I forgot

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 0nedon, Dec 31, 2019.

  1. 0nedon
    Joined: Oct 20, 2017
    Posts: 327

    0nedon
    Member

    Less than a week ago I was looking at the posts-- and someone comented about what he mixed together and applied on his car to keep it from rusting, said he only had to do it couple times a year, kept patina look without it rusting. I remember he commented he didn't like the clear coat paint over the old original paint. I' pretty sure it was acetone and mabey gum?? turpentine?. Hopefuly someone remembers or he"ll see this.I've went through the ads and can't find it. I thought it may of been in someone else garage tips but I have had no luck finding it I have an old car I would like to try it on and so does my neighbor.Many Thanks and Happy New Year!!
     
  2. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,252

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    Gibbs is your friend
     
  3. iron dave
    Joined: Nov 8, 2018
    Posts: 4

    iron dave

    Boiled linseed oil and mineral spirits 2 parts linseed 1 part spirits

    Sent from my SM-G960U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    tinsled and deathrowdave like this.
  4. Wasn't it PENETROL ?
     

  5. Penetrol.....it's what she just said...........
     
  6. BamaMav
    Joined: Jun 19, 2011
    Posts: 4,445

    BamaMav
    Member
    from Berry, AL

  7. 0nedon
    Joined: Oct 20, 2017
    Posts: 327

    0nedon
    Member

    Found it: little tips and tricks for garage hobbyist ,by Ron Brown; boiled linseed oil and acetone- 50/50. I want to thank everyone for there help and will be trying their mixtures also.
     
  8. Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Joined: Apr 20, 2008
    Posts: 4,094

    Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Member

    Acetone removes paint so I don't think that will help you preserve your old patina'd paint?
     
    54vicky, loudbang and belair like this.
  9. phoneman
    Joined: Dec 5, 2010
    Posts: 68

    phoneman
    Member
    from Missouri

    Watch what you do with boiled linseed soaked rags. Many stories of spontaneous combustion.
     
    Nostrebor, Blue One and loudbang like this.
  10. I was thinking the same thing. I've used WD40 on old finishes and it looked good to me. I just needed to reapply it every now and then to make it look good and to clean the dust off. It really attracted dust.
     
  11. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,877

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Heard of guys spraying diesel fuel, or mixed with motor oil, maybe not on exterior but undercarriage, metal stuff left outside etc.. Anyone do this?
     
  12. If I am trying to save old paint I use car wax. Turtle wax liquid if you're lazy.
    I don't like to do much that has to do with oil or any petroleum product on something that I may want to paint some day.

    @blowby kerosene or diesel fuel mixed with drain oil is kind of the old standby for undercarriages. Painted or bare.
     
  13. tinsled
    Joined: Sep 7, 2007
    Posts: 611

    tinsled
    Member

    First of all; Do not use lubricants, such as WD40 (or diesel fuel, god forbid...) on your car exterior (or interior) surfaces, no matter what you are looking to preserve. Oil will not ever dry, but only collects dust & dirt and tarnish everything & every one...

    Boiled linseed oil is basically a simple organic lacquer, but dries very slowly on hard, non absorbing surfaces (as you know it's commonly used on wood).
    I suppose Ron Brown found that acetone used as thinner will accelerate the linseed oil drying process?
    I will also try this recipe, but starting with less acetone (70% BLO/30% acetone), adding acetone only if necessary for drying.
    Acetone is hard solvent, it may damage old paint depending on the type of the paint...

    As Iron Dave mentioned, mineral spirit might be safer alternative for old paint, but it may not be quick enough solvent to help BLO dry quick enough and properly (?)

    Anyway, the most important is to use BOILED linseed oil (=Varnish), not straight linseed oil (which would never dry).
     
  14. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,107

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've had some anecdotal experience with boiled linseed oil. My home is dark red brick and my lawn irrigation causes a chalky, mineral build-up where ever the spray hits the brick. Muriatic acid fails to remove much of the minerals but rolling or brushing on BLO does make it totally invisible. I can't say if the BLO prevents future build-up or not because the "invisible" effect only lasts for a month and the chalky crud is back, in my face again. It's not exactly a scientific test, but to me, that adds up to the protection only lasting a month.
    This next summer, I'm thinking of trying clear, flat. rattle can paint to test a section of the brick. You might try the same test on that patina mobile.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2020

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