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A survivor that I missed once by 10 minutes came home with me Fathers Day weekend

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by steel3window, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. Bill Rinaldi
    Joined: Mar 23, 2006
    Posts: 1,877

    Bill Rinaldi
    Member

    When you get around to telling more of your stories PLEASE keep them on this post. That way ALL OF US who have subscribed won't miss it!!!!! I did find ONE serious flaw that you wrote early on------and that is-----THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GREAT SUSHI!!! Sorry, thats a fact ---or at least a very difficult "ACQUIRED TASTE". Love your writing. Bill Rinaldi
     
  2. Bill Rinaldi
    Joined: Mar 23, 2006
    Posts: 1,877

    Bill Rinaldi
    Member

    When you get around to telling more of your stories PLEASE keep them on this post. That way ALL OF US who have subscribed won't miss it!!!!! I did find ONE serious flaw that you wrote early on------and that is-----THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GREAT SUSHI!!! Sorry, thats a fact ---or at least a very difficult "ACQUIRED TASTE". Love your writing. Bill Rinaldi
     
  3. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,910

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus

    Bill, all I can say is that if you didn't enjoy the sushi when you tried it, then you hadn't had enough of the Saki!
     
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  4. Toqwik
    Joined: Feb 1, 2003
    Posts: 1,310

    Toqwik
    Member

  5. Toqwik
    Joined: Feb 1, 2003
    Posts: 1,310

    Toqwik
    Member

    Sounds like you found an awesome car and lady friend. My wife won't ride with me 20 minutes away to get a car. That trip and has a shop, keeper in my book!


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  6. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Funny thing, my friend Kenny, who's father-in-law I got the car from refers to sushi as bait!

    Otherwise, thank you for the kind words.
     
  7. Bill Rinaldi
    Joined: Mar 23, 2006
    Posts: 1,877

    Bill Rinaldi
    Member

    D.O. MAN-----YA got me on that one!!! I do enjoy an occasional bout with Rice Wine. But have never connected it with Sushi or at least not at the same time. Might try copious amounts of Saki at the same time, but I'm pretty sure the results will be the same. Saki was good, the Sushi, not so much. Bill
     
  8. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Unfortunately I have been overwhelmed with a remodel of a rental that a former tenant destroyed, so I haven't been able to post things in a timely manner, but now that I'm catching up on the remodel, it's time to catch up this thread!

    On April 15th of this year, I was commencing with the clean up of the back yard of the rental when my phone rang, and it was Steve Minor.


    "Hi Brian, this is Steve minor, I found an old picture of the car I thought you'd like to see."

    "Great! I'm kinda buried this weekend, can I catch up with you this week?"

    "Sure. Sometime before Thursday would be best, I have to put my dog down then so I can take her up to the cabin this weekend to bury her."

    "I'm sorry to hear that. I will definitely get a hold of you before then."

    "Sounds good, talk to you then."

    And that quickly the conversation ended, which was rare with Steve. I have come to know him as quite the talker, with many stories to tell. I spent the rest of the day contemplating his upcoming loss, and the feelings of losing a good dog while I cleaned up.

    I dare to attest, nearly all of us have been there.

    Wednesday morning came and I had a break and took it as an opportunity to stop by and see what Steve had dug up.

    Rather than give a quoted play by play as I normally do (partly because I didn't take good enough notes, and partly because too much time has passed for me to recall all of the conversation succinctly) The best I can do is attempt to give an overview of the few hours I spent with Steve.

    He was genuinely happy to see me, lamenting how his wife had gone to town, and how she was from the old school and probably wouldn't have wanted me in the house because it wasn't in the proper shape for visitors.

    We spent a fair amount of time talking about his dog (whose name I can't recall, and feel I am doing her a disservice by not remembering it) and all the hunting trips they had taken together as she struggled to follow us around. I believe she was 14 or 15, pretty up there for a lab. It was a bit heart wrenching to see in her eyes the desire to please, and the appearance of having all the mental faculties to do so, but being stuck in a body that just couldn't do it anymore.

    We talked about all the trips he had taken since the last time we spoke. Ecuador, the Galapagos, which he really enjoyed because he was a biology major, and a cruise to Hawaii, which he never recommends because cruises are boring and predictable without any adventure.

    The conversation eventually turned to the car, and the picture came out.

    P4191002.JPG

    Unfortunately this was the best "picture-of-a-picture" I could get

    Steve said that it was taken in September of 1962 right after he washed it, because he recognized the place it is parked as the spot he always washed the car, guessing it was before a game or weekend cruise.

    He also noted that the tires were 8.20's in the back, and 5.50's in the front, and how he was always amazed how the perspective made them look the same size.

    He then brought out an old tin full of keys, and after digging through it, pulled out an old Ford key thinking it might fit the column in the car. (I haven't had a chance to pull out the broken off key and try the one he gave me yet.)

    I told him about the adventure in the wind at the Portland Swap Meet, and that I got a couple 15" rims at for free so I could put new tire on it soon. Probably bias plys, and that I was leaning toward whitewalls with 8.20's on the back like he had run, and also to get the diameter up so the old flattie doesn't have to wind so hard just to get passed on the freeway.

    I recall him then grinning and making a comment how just sitting at a drive in movie the tires would go flat on one side when the cooled off and how it took a few miles before the ka-thunk ka-thunk went away. I seem to remember him saying was ok back when your date had a pair of bullets under her sweater, and the jiggle it caused didn't bother him either.

    Some time passed in conversation, and I realized I had appointments to make, and work to do. He thanked me for pleasant conversation on what he thought would be an otherwise rough day anticipating tomorrow, and told me he was headed on a month long trip across Europe, and we'll connect when he returns and finds more pictures to entice me over with.
     
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  9. I had forgotten I subscribed to this thread. AWESOME!
     
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  10. Tim_with_a_T
    Joined: Apr 30, 2011
    Posts: 1,421

    Tim_with_a_T
    Member

    I just saw this for the first time. From your first post:
    "We get to McCall and pull into a hotel parking lot. I call Ron. His directions are 'See that first light, hang a left, go past the end of the runway to the first road, hang a left. Go until you see the old DC-3 in the woods by Scott Road, and pull over by the tin buildings. I'll meet you there.'"
    I know right where you were. Been up there many times. Congrats on the car.
     
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  11. I used to run the gut on Willamette (sp) out to A&W on 29th in the early 60s. Brings back the memories for sure. Eugene was a big car town in the era.
     
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  12. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you Hunter73 and Tim_with_a_T

    nomobux, Steve Minor told a few stories about driving to Eugene specifically for the cruise scene because it was so much bigger there.
     
  13. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,464

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Since this thread continues to live on it it's obvious that you haven't found a new home for the coupe yet.
    Nice car, I like it and the story too.
     
  14. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you.

    Fortunately the events that caused me to put it up for sale have passed. However, it is still available to the right person, though I am in no hurry to sell it, and getting a feel for buyers can be tough. I have turned down full price offers because the individual told me what they were going to do to it after they got it, and their ideas didn't align with my feeling on what should be done with the car. I won't go into detail, but needless to say, it would no longer be allowed on the H.A.M.B. if I had let it go.

    When the car does leave me, my hope is that the next person, and every person after that, will take over this thread and continue to write the story of it's life.
     
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  15. That's the only outcome this car should really have. Too much history with it.
     
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  16. Lou kriger
    Joined: Mar 16, 2009
    Posts: 914

    Lou kriger

    I read with interest your story of how you came across this Coupe, and I can appreciate how you feel it should be preserved and cared for. There are cars built everyday, but, sometimes some are more special than others. These are the ones that are passed on from one caretaker to the next. Caretakers are different from typical owners, they usually have a strong sense of history and appreciate what original builder accomplished those many years ago. Not everything was available back then, certainly the technology was “different” for the lack of a better term. So thanks for the great story, you my friend have all the attributes of a great Caretaker.



    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
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  17. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you mercman, I truly appreciate your kind words. I occasionally struggle with the prospect of whether to pass this car on to the next person, or to find the right modifications to continue to make it period correct and enjoyable to drive. For now it is hidden away in the garage while I attend to other, more pressing matters, and for the better weather to return.
     
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  18. Lou kriger
    Joined: Mar 16, 2009
    Posts: 914

    Lou kriger

    I can relate to making the decision as what is the right thing to do with that Coupe. One of the reasons that you ended up with the car, was, the previous owner felt comfortable with you taking over it’s ownership. Atleast that’s what I’ve gathered from the story. As Caretaker, preservation is key in my opinion, what the original builder did to it gives it the uniqueness that sets it apart. I’m going to close with some shot’s of the “John Shumsky Coupe’. Never dreamed some 54 years later that I would be it’s Caretaker. A lot of years have passed since first seeing it @ 12/13 years old, but everything about this Coupe became etched in my mind. I can do no less than keep it as built to honor the original builders. Later steel3window. Hope you and Yours have a Wonderful Christmas.[​IMG]


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  19. Lou kriger
    Joined: Mar 16, 2009
    Posts: 914

    Lou kriger

  20. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Not much happening with the coupe lately, as I have been remodeling an apartment, and helping to organize a friends huge estate of near 500 cars and more parts than I can count that will be for sale.

    I did have a nagging (slow spinning)starter issue, and after having it rebuilt (again) and replacing the solenoid. I am hoping to see more road miles.

    I did pull it out under a tree in the yard to take some better pictures of it.

    20180610_125546.jpg 20180610_125721.jpg 20180610_125629.jpg

    That's all for now.
     
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  21. FOURTYDLX
    Joined: Feb 22, 2006
    Posts: 718

    FOURTYDLX
    Member

    Great find,gofoit
     
  22. philo426
    Joined: Sep 20, 2007
    Posts: 2,097

    philo426
    Member

    What a great design!Note how well the front and rear fenders flow into each other!
     
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  23. enfieldjoe
    Joined: Jun 5, 2009
    Posts: 839

    enfieldjoe
    Member
    from Eustis, FL

    Great looking survivor. I wish it was closer to Florida......
     
  24. This is that wonderful dream we all have when we are getting a really good night's sleep and then, unfortunately, we have to wake up and face reality again. Fortunately we are experiencing it vicariously through your writing, photos and real life experience. THANKS! It's a great ride!
     
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  25. 13phillips head
    Joined: Jan 4, 2020
    Posts: 2

    13phillips head

     
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  26. 13phillips head
    Joined: Jan 4, 2020
    Posts: 2

    13phillips head

    well I couldnt find a place to reply to your post for the 64 galaxie convert, so hope this gets to you.
    still available, care to post more details, I am interested but probably wont buy something else when I get there. just the ford.
    Thanks
    Dave
     
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  27. Hover over his avatar, click 'Start a Conversation'. Send him a private message about it.
     
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  28. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It's been almost 2 years since I've posted anything, so I figured I'd give an update, or rather more of a journal entry of where things are.

    Unfortunately, with the business of life, I've only driven the car about three times (one of which is to the location pictured below) in the last 4 years. I had been remodeling her home to sell, which we did earlier this year before the COVID-19 really hit hard. I also have been remodeling my home, which I can sell in May of next year due to tax implications (we'll see how that goes now due to the potential economy issues that may occur from the shutdowns) The idea being that if we sold them both, we could make a slight upgrade of what we each have, and pay cash for what we buy (read as no mortgage) together.

    We were living in 1600 square feet, had a two car garage, and a 1000 square foot shop. To pull it all off, we elected to move into my mom's house because she is always gone traveling the world, visiting family, or taking care of a parent somewhere. It has 5 acres, so there is room for the horses, though I did have to build a barn and fence in a pasture before we moved. By living there, I also can identify things that need fixed/repaired/replaced, so mom comes back to a better home on the few occasions she stops in.

    Here's the catch; it's 1200 square feet with a 2 car garage, and we left her master bedroom and bath set up for when she comes back.


    So, everything we own is now crammed in about 800 square feet and a two car garage, and all the extra bodies/parts/projects are outside... under the trees... waiting to be rained on come fall.


    With all of the downtime we all are experiencing, I can't do any major work on the other house, for fear of getting halfway into it (disassembled) and not being able to reconstruct, due to the potential of further shutdowns. For instance, and as a bonus, my local steel shop recently closed due to the current restrictions, so I can't even get supplies to start fabbing anything in the driveway even if I wanted to.


    Ok, those last couple sentences was likely me venting a bit. I speculate, it's something we all are feeling.



    Back to the reason for the post.


    I had the car actively/passively for sale, just hoping to free up the space. However, most everyone seemed to want to trade, so first into the garage it went. The idea being that I could stack things around it with nothing touching it.


    Right before I took this shot, as we were looking for something that got packed away, Janeen and I were conversing about the move, all the stuff, and how it felt like getting to where we want to be feels so far away.

    As I snapped this picture, she said;


    "This must be how all those old garage finds started out"


    20200305_091107.jpg
     
  29. steel3window
    Joined: Jun 3, 2009
    Posts: 236

    steel3window
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Well, Over another year has passed, and the 'ol girl has seen some action.

    I moved her from being wedged in the back out to the front, and took her out for a few short drives last summer and fall. I also discovered that if I run non-ethanol Premium fuel (only sold at 2 places in town) instead of the cheap stuff, the occasional burping up coolant issue (due to the non-pressurized system) went away.


    In January, I put an ad in the Sacramento craigslist, and had a couple very interested parties. One of which asked me to verify that the VIN on the frame matches because he had an issue with purchasing a car previously, and had them not match. Causing quite an issue for him. I said "no problem. I've had the car almost 9 years now, but have never looked." After about half an hour of removing old road grime, and cleaning the numbers to make them clearly visible.

    Well, that was my demise...


    They didn't match.


    Somewhere in the car's history, I speculate, the DMV transposed a couple numbers, and since a VIN inspection isn't required when transferring title inside the state of Oregon, no one, including myself, ever caught it... Until now.

    Thus began the saga of rectifying the problem... During the DMV restricted access due to the Covid shutdown.

    Current policy is to direct everything to their website. Not finding what I needed. Surprise, surprise, surprise! (said in a Jim Neighbors voice) I called the local DMV number listed. Knowing full well I would be on hold for some time, I put it on speaker and made lunch. After lunch was consumed, I did the dishes, swept the floor, and accomplished several other tasks.

    Almost two hours later, a voice answered. I explained the situation, and of course it wasn't someone with any access to their systems. It was a call center. In Salem. Over 200 miles away. The only thing the call center was doing was to make appointments for the closest DMV to me. In Grants Pass. In April. FOUR MONTHS FROM NOW???

    AND the issuing of a title is taking around 16 weeks! At this rate I would get the title in July or August. IF everything went smoothly.

    Now for those of you (I'm looking at you Californians) who are used to making appointments, the norm here in good 'ol Oregon used to be: Take your vehicle to the local DMV, walk inside, take a number, and get everything resolved 99.9% of the time in 5 minutes on a slow day, to an hour ad a half on a busy day. This includes getting titles issued for Model A's drug our of the forest that have readable VIN numbers, and have been cleared by a State Patrol Vin verification.

    As dismaying as this was, somewhere in the process of the conversation, the operator noted that I would need a VIN verification, and that there are only a couple places that offer a drive up VIN verification without an appointment, and that they could be found on the website.

    EUREKA! I then recalled that a several weeks earlier, I had a similar conversation (after a similar time on hold) regarding getting a title for a VW convertible that someone had abandoned on one of my properties. I had a local tow lot lien the title, and after not being able to find the appropriate portal online for titling leined vehicles (they have added that feature now) the operator made mention of the same drive up inspection. Fortunately, the only one on I-5 was about an hour north of me. As I recalled, I had trailered the VW there, and as well as doing the inspection, they let me inside to get the title work done because I had filled out and printed all of the necessary paperwork. Also, because the title was processed by an office rather than mailed in, I got the VW title in 4-1/2 weeks!

    I took the risk, and had the tow lot lien the title on the '35.

    Without going into the details of how all of that works, because I'm guessing it varies from state to state, about 6 weeks later I was at the same DMV with all of the titling paperwork filled out, hoping I could pull off the same feat.


    Believe it or not, this is where the real story begins...


    I load the car on Sunday night because they only do drive up inspections Mondays and Wednesdays from 8 to noon (if I recall correctly) I get up early Monday (I am NOT a morning person) and proceed to make the haul north.

    I arrive at about 8:05, and the parking lot is near empty. Hopefully a good sign. I walk up and request a VIN inspection. One guy yells at another that there is a VIN inspection, and for him to come out. He appeared to be a trainee. Not a good sign, but I roll with it. I walk back to the car, open the drivers side hood, and wait. They both come over, and the senior guy (who looks to be maybe 30) glances in the window. I tell him it's not there, it's on the frame. He looks at me quizzically, gets out a flashlight, and begins what feels like a 10 minute inspection of the numbers on the frame, which I have chalked to make them easier to read.

    "I can't verify this VIN."

    "What? It's pretty clear, I even chalked it to make it easier to read."

    "Yes, that's the issue."

    "The chalk is the issue?"

    "Yes. It appears that the number has been stamped into the frame."

    "Correct. That is how all Fords from 1932 to '48 are. Stamped into the top of the frame on the drivers side just ahead of the firewall, with a star before and after the number. Just like this one."

    " I can't accept a stamped VIN. You'll have to get it inspected."

    "That's what I'm here for. An inspection."

    "No. I can't do it when it's been stamped. You will have to take it to the State Police."

    " Ok. So for clarification, you can't verify this perfectly readable VIN because you have surmised that it is stamped into the frame, which is how millions of Fords on the planet are all identified?"

    "Yes"

    "Ok. Where is the State Police station here?"

    "Just up the road."

    "I'm from Grants Pass. Could you be more specific"

    "Head north on the freeway. There are signs."


    I think he expected me to just google map it on my phone not realizing I come from the old world where we used verbal directions.


    I thank him the best I can because I know I'm going to come back to attempt to get inside without an appointment to get it titled if I was successful with the State Police, head north on the freeway, and lo-and-behold, good sing to locate the station.


    As I arrive, the parking lot is vacant. I walk up to the door to find a typed piece of paper stating that the doors are locked due to current restrictions, and to call a number. I call it. No answer. I leave a message.

    I climb int the truck, and as I contemplate my next move, an officer pulls up in his cruiser. I approached him and asked him about doing a VIN verification. Explaining that came from Grants Pass, mentioned the DMV issue, and gestured at the car on the trailer. He said he needed to do a couple things inside, and would see what he could do.

    I sat back in the truck, and after about 5 minuted he came out and said that they normally do VIN inspections on Fridays by appointment. But since I was already here, was having trouble with the DMV process, and came all the way from Grants Pass, he'd take care of it. He took pictures of the VIN with his phone, took the paperwork, and headed back inside.

    I got lucky there. Let's hope it continues.

    About 10 minutes later he emerged and said he cleared the VIN with all of the appropriate databases, as well as making sure it's not marked as stolen or titled to anyone else. He then spent another 10 minutes looking it over, taking pictures, and asking about it's history after looking at the sign I have in the 1/4 window. I told him that it came from Sutherlin, and I was headed to the trailer manufacturing place on old 99 where there used to be a pole peeling plant owned by a previous owners father. He noted that he knew right where that is, and said he'd better get back to work. I thanked him for his time, and for helping me, and headed north again.

    I figured a little stress cool down would be a good idea before I headed back to the DMV.


    Great Northern Trailers now occupies the site where Steve Minor's dad owned and ran a pole peeling plant on old Highway 99 right where it does two 90 degree bends to cross the railroad tracks just south of Sutherlin. My dad picked up a mini excavator a couple weeks prior, and the trailer he currently has isn't heavy enough to handle the weight of the new rig. Since I was so close to them, I figured I'd stop by and price trailers. FYI due to Covid, an 18 foot, non-power tilt, 14k trailer was $9,600 and 6 months out.

    When I pulled in, a couple guys came out to check out the car. In my haste to get information, and get back to Roseburg. like a buffoon, I neglected to take a picture of the car sitting in a place it probably hasn't been for over 60 years.


    Back to the DMV.


    I pull in, go up to a now different gentleman organizing the line to get inside, explain everything I have done, and ask if I can title it while I'm this far north.

    As luck would have it, I recognized the person working the door. His name is Robert, and he appears to be in his mid 50's. He is the same person who helped me with the VW previously, and knew exactly where the VIN was on that car, as well as being the person who let me in to title it afterword.

    "They sent you to the State Police? Is it not stamped on top of the frame on the drivers side in front of the firewall, with a star before and after the number?"

    I just smiled, nodded, and said yes.

    "Well, I think it's slow enough we can get you in. Do you have all of the paperwork?"

    I said yes and handed everything to him.

    He looked it all over with scrutiny, and asked if the lien paperwork was a copy or an original. I said it was what they gave me. he went inside and came back out with a loupe. You know the kind that people used to use to inspect pictures or negatives back in the days before digital pictures. He, and 3 other people who looked at it, including the manager, then surmised that the signature was a copy, and it needed to be a "wet" signature, because everything has to be original paperwork, not copies.


    Damn. So close.


    On the way home I called the tow lot, and fortunately I was able to swing by and exchange paperwork. In filing everything, they accidentally gave me the copy instead of the original. I had time, so I headed to the Grants Pass DMV hoping that they would take pity on my and let me finish the process.

    No luck. But she was kind enough to schedule an appointment for me... In May.


    I went home and as I unloaded the car I contemplated my options.


    I figured that I just might attempt the hour drive north hoping that all my troubles were still fresh in their memory, and they would let me in.

    Tuesday morning, I get up early again, and head north in my Japanese toaster that is a bit easier to drive and consumes much less fuel on all of the mountain passes than the diesel pulling the trailer. A bit of a risk to not take the car, but I have all the paperwork and inspections signed and ready to go.

    I pull up and Robert is working the door. Definitely a good sign.

    He remembers me. As I ask if I could finish the process started yesterday. He asks if I had everything corrected. I reply yes, and hand it all to him. Out comes the loupe, and he says everything looks good, and to wait a moment, and he can get me in.

    As I wait I ask him a few questions I had about an unrelated item. This guy is a wealth of DMV knowledge! As the conversation evolved we get onto subjects I didn't even ask about. Apparently he has been working there for a few decades!

    My turn comes, I go in, get a number, and sit down. 2 minutes later my number gets called, They must know my story now, because out comes the loupe again, the person helping me, as well as the manager look at it. It's ok'd, and The whole process takes about 10 minutes. And as a bonus, because the State Police did the VIN inspection, I wasn't charged by the DMV for it.


    Elation!


    As I drive home, as I come down from the stress of the whole process I find myself having a bit of concern about whether or not I'll actually get a title, if it will be correct, and when it will show up. As well as if it will come to the correct address, because I filled it out to go to my mom's because my house is for sale, and I know federal and state mail does not get forwarded.


    That was the 23rd and 24th of March 2021. On Saturday the 1st of May a letter from the DMV arrived in the mail at my mom's address.


    You know that stress of wondering? Kind of like the Schrodinger's cat paradox. Looking at that letter, that wasn't shaped like a normal title envelope, I wondered if it is a title or not. Realizing it's both and neither until it's opened.


    It was.


    After much tearing of robes and gnashing of teeth, I now possess a correct, clean, clear, current Oregon title in my name with a Vin on the title that matches the VIN on the frame. I checked it 3 times.



    Success
     
  30. Good job, Perseverance and a cool head prevailed. (I'm assuming a cool head). And all of that because of a simple transposition mistake years ago. Glad you got it all worked out.
     
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