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Hot Rods 6 volt clock test?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by cougstang, Dec 30, 2021.

  1. cougstang
    Joined: Apr 2, 2012
    Posts: 122

    cougstang
    Member
    from Illinois

    I have a 50 Ford 6 volt clock I need to test but do not have a 6v battery. Will a 9 volt battery "spark" it? Thanks
     
  2. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 12,306

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Try four AA in series……1.5v x 4 = 6v. The 9v may work…..as I recall, the ‘electric’ part just rewinds the clock periodically……not sustained power.

    Ray
     
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  3. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 3,396

    51504bat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  4. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,933

    squirrel
    Member

    12v will work, too. The coil is designed for 6 volts, but it will operate on 12v, and it is on such a short time that it won't have a chance to get hot with the extra current flowing through it.

    A 9v battery probably does not have nearly enough current to make the coil pull hard enough to wind the clock. They're made to power transistors, not solenoids
     
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  5. PhilA
    Joined: Sep 6, 2018
    Posts: 1,427

    PhilA
    Member

    The one I rebuilt for my Plymouth used particularly heavy gauge wire (and still stuck and burned out like they love to).

    Modern alkaline batteries have a much lower internal resistance than they used to, you should get a nice click out of a little 9V square battery. It'll pop a decent spark off the terminal, too.
     
  6. I use a 1 amp fuse and a 6 volt lattern battery .
     
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  7. nosford
    Joined: Feb 7, 2011
    Posts: 680

    nosford
    Member

    changed my 55 over to 12 Volt about a year ago and the clock has been working fine every since. I don't think it's a problem to use a 12 Volt power source, it only uses power for a split second to wind then runs on the clock spring for a few minutes till it winds again. As mentioned, you will hear a click when it winds.
     
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  8. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 7,473

    BJR
    Member

    I have been running my 6 V clock in my 49 Buick on 12 V for 6 years with no problems.
     
    Bob Lowry likes this.
  9. check it with a 6/12 volt battery charger...
     
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  10. cougstang
    Joined: Apr 2, 2012
    Posts: 122

    cougstang
    Member
    from Illinois

    Thanks for all the replies.
     
  11. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 11,001

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I think the voltage just winds the spring. Mine for 1-2 seconds about every 5 minutes. The points that carry the current need to be clean..
     
  12. 5w30
    Joined: Mar 27, 2007
    Posts: 150

    5w30
    Member
    from oregon

    I use a 4 amp 6v charger to test all my 6v parts and it works great without any damage..
     
  13. This is the inside of a 6 volt clock .At the top is the solenoid that moves the plunger out ,tripping the points at the lower right . 20211225_102753.jpg 20211225_000759.jpg
     
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  14. fleetside66
    Joined: Nov 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,777

    fleetside66
    Member

    So, the Pos. lead from a 6V Rayovac to the wire & the Neg. lead to a ground & it should work instantly?
    IMG_9321.jpg
     
  15. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 7,473

    BJR
    Member

    I don't think old clocks care about polarity. If you switch the leads it won't run backwards.
     
  16. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 11,001

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It’s funny they were called “electric”. They were electric “wind up” spring and functioned mechanically.
     
  17. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 918

    cfmvw
    Member

    I have a 12V clock that stopped working. At the suggestion of a HAMBer, I discovered that a brass internal ground strap was oxidized enough to lose conductivity, and the tungsten points that rewind the mechanism were dirty from 50+ years of use. Cleaned them both up and it worked like new again. If yours doesn't click when you apply power to it, it might be something to look for if you decide to open it up.
     
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  18. fleetside66
    Joined: Nov 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,777

    fleetside66
    Member

    So, if you apply a 6V battery to one, is there a lag time between the "wind up" & when the needles actually start moving to keep time? When I hooked up the positive lead to the wire & the negative to one of the mounting posts, all I got was some sparking from the lead to the post. No needle movement. I don't want to open the thing up to see if there's anything obvious going on if I don't have to...like a lag time between power & the finished winding procedure. Am I missing something?
     
  19. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 11,001

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I don’t know, when it winds down the points touch and a solenoid winds the spring so it continues to work on my 56 which is 12v neg ground. As it runs, the spring winds down and the points touch staring the process over again.
     
  20. tbirddragracer
    Joined: Jul 25, 2013
    Posts: 113

    tbirddragracer
    Member

    When the spring winds down and the points close the solenoid activates, the spring rewinds in a fraction of a second.
    This same action also opens the points and removes power to the solenoid. When the spring is wound and the
    points are open, there will be no spark or arc at the wire terminal. If you have an old clock and you touch a hot
    wire to the terminal and no spark or arc is present, open the clock up and begin the checking process with
    the points, solenoid, and winding spring.
     
  21. And a 1 amp fuse is a good idea as well
     
    jimmy six likes this.
  22. lostviking
    Joined: Dec 23, 2019
    Posts: 54

    lostviking

    Doesn't seem to matter, but is it a negative ground car?
     
  23. fleetside66
    Joined: Nov 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,777

    fleetside66
    Member

    Yes, but the clock is not in the car.
     

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