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Projects '49 Styleline Deluxe - Project FrankenStyle

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by FrankenRodz, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Thank You! It's always nice when someone Gets It.

    I've been doing this for 40 years, but have always managed to avoid replacing a traditional Bow Headliner
    - until now!
    The install went much easier than anticipated, but a few wrinkles leave me disappointed. I searched everywhere for comprehensive instructions, but came up empty. The one constant I kept finding was secure the front and rear first then work the sides, which is what I did, and will never do it again! Pulling the front and rear at the end is the great equalizer, and removes most of the wrinkling issues.

    With this car, there are 3-types of attachment:
    - Barbed Teeth which the Headliner hooks-over
    - Blind Barbed Teeth over the doors, in which you tuck the Headliner into
    - Traditional Tack Strip you staple the Headliner to

    The next time, this is the process I would use for FABRIC HEADLINER INSTALLATION.

    1. Clip the Stiched Sleeve in which the Bows install 2" short of the Bow end. This will allow pulling the Headliner without restriction.
    2. Once hung in the car, Steam the entire Headliner. This will allow you to over-stretch the fabric, and it will shrink tight when dry.
    3. Temp secure the Front and Rear with Binder Clips from an office supply store.
    4. Install over the Doors first. Once the Headliner is tucked in, it isn't coming back out.
    5. For this car the Tack Strips at the A, B, and C Pillars, and around the Rear Side Windows, was replaced and glued-in with 3M Weatherstrip Adhesive. This holds better than the original staples. Once dry for a few days, staple the Headliner in place using a home center hand staple gun with 1/4 T50 staples. No need for fancy pneumatic equipment.
    6. Now the front and rear can be permanently installed, with 3M 90 Spray Adhesive, for extra hold in case the original Barbed Teeth are broken or don't hold.
    7. Steam the entire Headliner using Distilled Water, for less chance of staining. In my case, I used a total of a 1/2 gallon of water. 3-hours the first day, and another 3-hours a few days later.

    IMG_0473.JPG View attachment 3692460
    3B0AA630-E8A6-495E-B3EB-99116AB9677A.jpeg 04D79B79-5D50-4C45-8A5A-5FFCDA836689.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
    RamJet1 and Bowtie Coupe like this.
  2. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,068

    RMONTY
    Member

    Couple of questions....

    1. Did you paint the roof before applying the Xmat? If so what product did you use?
    2. What did you do in regards to the package tray? Any pics of that?

    Your work is very inspiring, as mentioned by others!
     
  3. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Much of the Board-Insulation from the factory was falling off, so I wet it and scraped as much off as possible.
    (I would bet this is asbestos!)
    I rattle-canned the inside with Rustoleum Rust Reformer before applying the XMat. I use Rust Reformer on everything! Less mess, you can start and stop with ease, and more penetrating coverage.
    The XMat held incredibly! When it's on, it's on, and there is no repositioning.

    QUICK FACT: Rust Reformer Spray Paint is sold in auto parts stores and home centers. The same paint is labeled for homeowner use, with a white label, and automotive use, with a red label. The white label can has been around for a long time is more than $1. less per can than the later introduced automotive version!

    The Package Tray was made from my other "Go-To" product; Sintra. As noted before, it's a PVC type product that is made for exterior applications, so it does not warp, it's waterproof, and shapeable.

    Here was my process, which I've been doing for years:

    - Template the shape using an old Wall Hung Paper Calendar. I like these because you can tear off the pages as needed, they're thin enough that you can scribe the shape with your fingernail, and then cut the line using scissors.
    If I screw up an area, it didn't cost me anything but time.
    - Tape down the template to your sheet of Sintra. In this case, 1/8".
    - Trace and cut to size using a utility knife. I go outside the line, and then belt-sand to the line for a smooth continuous shape.
    - 3M 90 spray the Sintra and Fabric, let them tack-up, and apply. Once it's down you can reposition if necessary, but it may tear or distort the material. This stuff holds like iron when properly used. Don't use too thin a material or the glue will bleed through. I used the same Sunbrella Fabric as the door panels because it's made for the outdoors, and will not fade or break down quickly. Chipboard, and Masonite will swell if wet, and distort in the heat.
    - I put down 3/4" thick x 3" wide medium density foam along the entire base of the rear window before installing the Package Tray, so it would stay tight against the window trim, but you can heat the Sintra first and shape it to the slight contour.

    Pkg Tray Template.JPG IMG_1134.JPG
    9312DF36-102C-4121-B772-34EB45194F15.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
    Paul B likes this.
  4. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,068

    RMONTY
    Member

    Great info.....where do "you" purchase this "Sintra"? Is it something available at the big box stores, or do you order it online, or some local specialty supplier?
     
  5. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    I get mine online from FoamBoard Source.
    https://www.foamboardsource.com/sintra-pvc-foam--sintra-pvc-board.html

    It comes in a variety of sizes/colors/thicknesses.
    If you only need a small amount, you could probably get some from a local Sign Shop. It's used for exterior signage.
    I generally use white or black, depending upon the fabric I'm using, so the color doesn't transfer through the material.

    Here's a shot of the back of the Interior Panel, before fabric, and after.

    IMG_1030.JPG IMG_0528.JPG
     
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  6. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,068

    RMONTY
    Member

    So what is the thickness you use? The link you posted shows 5 different thicknesses, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 6 mm and 13 mm. I would guess the 3 mm as that is about 1/8" if I'm not mistaken. I reviewed your other posts and didn't see the thickness used mentioned. Obviously, different thickness for different applications, but the door panels and package tray is...?? Thanks again for sharing!
     
  7. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Here are a few shots of previous Sintra useage.
    My '62 Fairlane Package Tray and Interior Panel, my '50 3100 Door Panel, which I glued 2" Rigid Insulation Foam to the Sintra, after shaping it on the belt sander, and my '32 Ford with Door Panels, BulkHead, and Headliner.
    Pass. Upshot.JPG
    Driver Int..JPG

    IMG_0182.JPG Back Seat.JPG DSCN0428.JPG
     
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  8. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    2-3mm, depending upon your application. Too thin and it will not have any integrity.
    For the somewhat contoured Package Tray, like in my '49, I'd go with 2mm. For flat Door Panels I use 3mm.
    Sorry I never referenced Metric Sizing, I'm American!

    Select placement of 3M Double-Sided Automotive Body Molding Tape helps hold things in place, and I also like using face-applied Screws and #8 or #10 Plastic Snap Caps for Door Panels (as seen along the vertical door opening in the photo - light green/tan/and brown).

    IMG_0525.JPG
     
  9. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,068

    RMONTY
    Member

    Is that a CNC cut drunk monkey on the package tray? Just wondering.....
     
  10. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 16,704

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    lots of interesting things going on here... nice car, so glad you didn't cut it up. :)
     
  11. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Drunk Monkey is the Third Brake Light! His Eyes will light up once the wiring is completed.
    He came from SpeedCult, one of the best and most consistent vendors at the Daytona Turkey Run.
    I come out of there every year with a bag full of Crazy Metal! (It's always fun going through Airport Security with that stuff in my carry-on luggage!)

    IMG_0526.JPG IMG_0096.JPG IMG_0095.JPG
     
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  12. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Great Vintage Speed Test, showing just how capable these cars are!

    49fc14.jpg
     
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  13. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    More Trim is back on the Car.
    As earlier stated, the sheet metal under each piece of Trim was either ground to bare metal and painted with Rust Reformer, or on the thin pieces, hand sanded and Satin Cleared. I also put Clear Silicone Caulking in every Fastener Hole before reinstalling the Trim, as an added extra weatherproof precaution.
    All the clips were wire-wheeled and also shot with Rust Reformer.

    IMG_0579.JPG

    Primed Clips 2.JPG Primed Clips.JPG
     
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  14. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    1948 Pontiac Straight 8 Accelerator Pedal Linkage Rod!
    Who would have thought. The Engine swap was done before I got the Car, and the Accelerator Pedal was about 2" off the floor, with a hack Rod setup . The Rod pictured on the Right was the culprit, so I bought an original 1949 Rod which turned out to be 3" too long. I took the Rod off a Woody Station Wagon we have at the Shop, and it was a perfect fit! No Fab required.

    IMG_0570.JPG IMG_0581.JPG IMG_0582.JPG

    IMG_0474.JPG
     
  15. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    The Interior is almost complete, as I fabbed new Upholstered Panels for the B-Pillars.
    The original cardboard panels were pretty beat, so I made new Sintra Panels, wrapped them with the extra material from the new head liner, and attached them with 3M Auto Body Molding Tape.
    I'll do the same for the A-Pillars, once I install the new Windshield.

    IMG_0583.JPG IMG_0587.JPG IMG_0594.JPG IMG_0595.JPG
     
  16. wileyz62
    Joined: Oct 31, 2013
    Posts: 5

    wileyz62
    Member

    Those floor pans turned out nice!,This car is in good shape.
     
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  17. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Thanks! Yeah, I lucked-out. The Car is incredibly clean, with spotless door bottoms. The only other rust was the Battery Tray, which I replaced with a repop., and a small hole ahead of the Rear Driver Wheel where crud collected in the wheel well. I've cut that open and cleaned it out, but may just leave it like that. (Photo is Before Shot from the previous owner).

    IMG_4720.JPG IMG_0334.JPG
     
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  18. You have transformed a mundane vehicle into something very appealing. Great work.
    I'm interested in the rust reformer.Where ? Lowes, Home Depot?
     
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  19. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Thank You, I appreciate it.
    Rust Reformer is a Rustoleum Product, so available typically wherever those products are sold.
    I happen to have a Home Depot near my home and Shop, so that's where I get it.
    This is the Can that is the same product, but for less $ than what's offered at Auto Parts Stores.

    flat-black-rust-oleum-stops-rust-general-purpose-spray-paint-215215-64_1000.jpg
     
  20. Thanks. Picture vs 1k words:) Will ck it out tomorrow.
     
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  21. Lowes and and Home Depot have it in my town. Wal Mart has it also, but you have to order it.Will pick some up tomorrow.Looking over the pics again . this is better than factory work. It's art.
     
  22. Shorty_AT
    Joined: Oct 28, 2017
    Posts: 14

    Shorty_AT
    Member

    Hey, as already mentioned, I really like the style you build your chevy and also the technical implementation. I'm curious how it look's when it's finished.
    There is one question I do have, what type of air cleaners are you using on your carbs?

    Thanks, Stefan
     
  23. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Thank you Both.
    I Build a Ride every 2-years purely for the Challenge. In fact I rarely make my money back, but it's a lot more enjoyable not working under deadlines or budget, and I've convinced my Wife it's cheaper than Golf!
    Hopefully it will be a cohesive Design once completed.
    Stefan, those Air Cleaners are from Steve Langdon, Langdon's Stovebolt. He sells them with a custom fabricated aluminum adapter plate for the Carter/Webber Carbs. The Wing Nuts are from Con2R. They don't offer small size anymore, so these are medium.

    IMG_0571.JPG
     
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  24. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,068

    RMONTY
    Member

    Did you use the factory throttle linkage on the Weber carbs? I also have Tom Langdons carbs and upper linkage setup but haven't installed them yet. Just wondered if you used the stock 235 linkage and just tweaked and twisted until it worked?
     
  25. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Post #74 best illustrates what I came up with for Linkage.
    It's a combination of Langdon's Upper Linkage, Mother Trucker's Linkage Rod only, basterdized cut/welded Pivot, and '48 Pontiac Accelerator Pedal Linkage Rod. (The Upper Linkage Rod had also been cut/welded by previous owner so I didn't want to waste time with it. It was the only useful part in Trucker's Kit for my application).
    Everything worked great with no modifications, except for the Pivot and Pedal Linkage Rod, which took some time to figure out.
    NOTE: Everything, including the E Brake had to clear the Dual Exhaust, which I'm hoping to complete the install this coming weekend, and will post Pics and Description. (The E Brake Rod had to be cut-down to stop short of hitting the front Exhaust Pipe).
     
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  26. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Another "Not too Exciting" Post, but necessary:
    The 2-Shields that bolt to the frame at the base of the firewall were a little beat-up, so we made new ones.
    The passenger side doesn't really do anything, but the driver side does protect the High Beam and Brake Switches from debris. If you haven't been under your Car yet, you may want to check and make sure they are there.
    4-bolts hold each side on.

    IMG_0609.JPG IMG_0608.JPG
     
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  27. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    E8E7CD17-F2B9-4957-93D2-59E56D52FCD0.jpeg E0AAF13F-29FD-47D3-9183-EADF86391BFA.jpeg Dual Exhaust is done!
    This was the Kit that comes with 3-Prebent Lengths per side (over-axle lengths were already in place when laid-out picture was taken), Glass Pack Mufflers, and Williams Cast Iron Headers.
    The Kit fit surprisingly well, just took some time laying it out. Definitely well worth the money.
    I had some Heat Wrap left over from another Build, so I wrapped the Pipes in the Engine Bay. Just enough to add a little extra heat protection right down to the side of the Oil Pan. This was a real tight squeeze around the Throttle Linkage and Emergency Brake. I cut-down the EBrake end to clear the front Exhaust Pipe. Still waiting on Heater Parts to come back from SandBlaster before I fire it up, so no report on how it sounds yet.

    IMG_0578.JPG IMG_0610.JPG IMG_0612.JPG IMG_0613.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2017
  28. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Popped the Rocker Moldings off, and clean as a whistle! (Aside from a little surface rust).
    I wire-wheeled all the rust, and shot both entire Rockers with Rust Reformer.
    The Moldings are the only trim on the car that took a beating, so before I rework and polish them,
    please keep me in mind if you come across any NOS Moldings I can replace them with.

    IMG_0626.JPG IMG_0628.JPG IMG_0629.JPG IMG_0630.JPG
     
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  29. mbrede
    Joined: Aug 7, 2008
    Posts: 53

    mbrede
    Member
    from Minnesota

    Brilliant post...you've got me yearning for more
     
  30. FrankenRodz
    Joined: Dec 20, 2007
    Posts: 838

    FrankenRodz
    Member

    Thank You. I really appreciate it.
    I wish I had more time to work on the Car, but I usually do these Builds over the Winter when work is slow, and right now it's the busy-season for me and making money comes first.
    This week, after bleeding the Brakes and getting ready to finally put the Car down on the ground, a stuck rear wheel cylinder set me back. Replacement Wheel Cylinders for the Rear Brakes are not offered, so I found an alternative which I've been told should work. The Cars originally came with a 1-1/8" Bore, and the replacements are 1-3/16".
    We'll fire it up today, set the timing, and let it sit for a day to check for leaks. Hopefully Pics of it sitting on the ground by the Weekend!
    In the meantime, here's my Antenna Replacement. I posted this on another Hamber's Post, but thought She should be added to this Timeline. A cast-metal Liquor Bottle Stopper, the ribbed rubber base fit into the Antenna Mast Fender Hole, and I slid an E-Clip between the underside of the Fender and the Rubber Stopper, so she will not pull out.

    IMG_0210.JPG IMG_0209.JPG
     

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