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Technical 4 cylinder mercruiser-engined cars

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by dennis g, Oct 9, 2015.

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  1. Rubens Jr
    Joined: Jun 1, 2015
    Posts: 10

    Rubens Jr

    A friend of mine installed a 4 bangerr Mazda in his Hot Rod. He just got rid of the EFI, made a custom built intake in order to use a carb and the results are pretty good.
     
  2. If you mean the "elusive banger" thread, we both participated in it. I have found other threads, but none as large as the 470 thread.
    dennis
     
  3. Turbos existed as early as 1916 on ship engines. As superchargers were used on cars in the old days I see no objection to their use except that boost pressure easily causes detonation which can totally destroy an engine. I found out that about detonation in the school of hard knocks so to say.
    ( I could not resist the pun.)
    A light car with good motive force is the goal. Torque is nice, very nice...rpm and gear reduction accomplish the same without the weight of a torque monster but using rpm is a different driving experience than relying on torque.
     
  4. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    Boost like every thing else we use to improve the performance of our engines must be used in proportion to the rest of the plan. You can kill a build with too much of anything.:eek:
     
  5. volvobrynk
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,588

    volvobrynk
    Member
    from Denmark

    Except for the lack of cash, NOTHING killed as many engines as boost, and nothing won so much bets as a sleeper with a blower.
     
  6. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    One of these stout little 4 cylinders would would leave plenty of room under the hood of anything for lost of blower stuff. There is a turbo manifold made for the 153 head. My choice would be a McCulloch because I have some and it would be easy.
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  7. Easy is really good. Although turbos have a power advantage, I would sacrifice that for an easier build. I'd choose a small (non GMC) roots blower, they are cheap enough and are in proportion to the small engine.
    Given the choice, I'd choose durability over something at the edge of self destruction.
     
  8. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,569

    indyjps
    Member

    How about chevy 2.4 ecotec. They come in chevy colorado, so rear wheel drive 5 spd and automatic are readily available. They are also used in a couple of sprint car midget series, so upgraded heads, ignition etc are available.

    It will use crank trigger ignition, I've seen a few conversions to mechanical fuel injection, so carbs could be done.

    MWR technologies posted this, they don't have a site, just a Facebook page.
    http://www.indianaopenwheel.com/showthread.php?t=73357&styleid=17
     
    AHotRod likes this.
  9. Phil1934
    Joined: Jun 24, 2001
    Posts: 2,608

    Phil1934
    Member

    quad4rods has an Ecotec Weber intake and ignition, but as with other modern 4s the costs escalate quickly. Mercruiser, Lima and Chevy II seem to be lowest cost.
     
  10. BZNEIL
    Joined: May 28, 2005
    Posts: 656

    BZNEIL
    Member

    Here is my Mercruiser/Chevy II Full race midget engine. Mechanical fuel injection, Magneto, crank driven water pump, cam driven fuel pump. Runs on alcohol.

    [​IMG]
     
    kidcampbell71 and volvobrynk like this.
  11. drtrcrV-8
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 1,027

    drtrcrV-8
    Member

    Don't limit yourselves to MerCruiser for Chevy 4-cyl clones as almost all the marine engine/drive companies(OMC, etc) used some variation of the "Chevy-2 " 4-cyl motor. One of the best sources for them seems to be 'Marine Salvage Yards'(same as Auto Salvage Yards, only for boats), although boat mechanical shops & dealers often have a 'pile' of replaced/'junk' engines out back that can often be bought for not much more than the current 'scrap' price.
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  12. stude54ht
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 548

    stude54ht
    Member
    from Spokane WA

    This is a Toyota 4A-ge in my 26 roadster
     

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  13. Manager
    Joined: Mar 22, 2014
    Posts: 234

    Manager
    Member

  14. That is the 181 cubic engine that keeps getting talked about. I am running one in the car I show in Post #4 except I am running the 153 passenger car head on it due to availability (30 years ago) of manifolds. Excellent engine. Bolts to a early Ford V8 trans with the same adapter used for the SBC to early Ford trans. Price seems like about what you could get them direct from GM, check it out. You would probably be better off changing the cam to one for the street.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  15. Manager
    Joined: Mar 22, 2014
    Posts: 234

    Manager
    Member

    O.K. thanks Charlie.They say it comes with inlet and exhaust manifolds, might ask them if they have a pic to see if at least the inlet is useable. Il'l give it some thought.
     
  16. When I installed mine it was from a Mercruiser installation and the exhaust manifold was water cooled and integral with the intake manifold. The one you see is for industrial use and could very well have useable manifolds. Post what you find out, I may put the 181 head on mine if the manifolds are available.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  17. BZNEIL
    Joined: May 28, 2005
    Posts: 656

    BZNEIL
    Member

    That is the same long block in the midget race car I posted earlier
     
  18. That is about as I see it. If there is an OMC chevy 181, I'd include it also.
    Boat engines break from freezing and rust so "core motor" blocks and heads should be carefully checked for rust and cracks. Although useable, the cam should be ground to a car profile. The Merc 470 has a poor reputation for trouble, but as it is aluminum and runs antifreeze should be free from rust and freezing and it has very good power so it is worth considering ( unless its previous owner is unusually stupid). Other than for rust, I think the 181 would be a good second choice and it should be free from the 470's headgasket sealing problems. The 153 supposedly has an 0.080" oversize bore limit so the 4" D cup pistons which knock less can't be used unless it is ok to bore it another 0.045" and make it a 181 in bore.
    ( this is my present situation).
    A. two good cranks and cams (181 and 153)
    B. one good head (181)
    C. one 181 block with stitched and sealed freeze damage
    D. one 153 block with such deep pits in one cylinder that they could becoming in from the water jacket
    E. all the other stuff that does not matter survived fine.
    The Lima option would lack the problems common to marine engines but has less power than Mercruiser because the largest Lima Ford(2.5L) only equals the smallest Mercruiser engine size.

    A crossflow head, (not on the 120 and 140 Mercs) would be a nice plus.
     
  19. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    Volvo used these for marine engines too.
    Mine is a .040 over 153 with a 181 crank and rods and forged Ross flat tops got from Tom Lowe. They ate for a 250 Chevy 6 made a little taller. They come out very close to zero deck. I'm still building it.
    [​IMG]
     
    29EHV8 likes this.
  20. What piston is in the #3 hole? The old 181 pistons were d cup to allow squish for less detonation along with somewhat lowered compression for the longer stroke rod. The 181 head volume was enough more than on the 153 that it was the main volume increase ( I never did measure the difference, it looked much bigger) I have had detonation problems before and am being careful about that this time. I'll trade lower compression for an engine that lasts more than a season.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2015
  21. If I remember correctly (I put my 181 together 30 years ago) that is an original GM piston. Makes me wonder if there will be a valve clearance problem with the flat top pistons.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  22. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    The other piston is for a 307 SBC. I have never seen another set with only 2 valve cuts. Here are some more pictures with a 153 piston on a 181 rod and crank. Also shown all with 181 crank and rod are 250 Chevy 6 (D cup) Ross 250 Chevy 6 (flat top) & 307 ( 2 valve cuts). These are all .040" over in a 153 block. The last picture is the stock 153 piston, rod and crank.
    https://picasaweb.google.com/sixpic...&authkey=Gv1sRgCLqdr6if7JizfQ&feat=directlink
    https://picasaweb.google.com/sixpic...&authkey=Gv1sRgCO-Losj327SrBg&feat=directlink
    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/tT_L2pheHhll73BQjvPZjMxYiLaQelFb2UvUclC35_U?feat=directlink
    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/CZKfgGw5Z8IVbqqrPB03fgs6s1v1LV8IgsHFIR5nIl0?feat=directlink
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2015
  23. I always check them with modeling clay on the pistons.
     
  24. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    The 153 is 2/3 of a 230 Chevy six. The flat tops are designed for a 250 Chevy six. They are the same engine with different strokes. Valve clearance should not be a problem but will be checked. The piston with valve cuts are V8 pistons. 307 pistons are a little taller than stock. 153s have a 3.875" bore and 181s are 4.0".
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  25. My 153 block is now 0.060" over on one hole (cleaning some pits that are still persist) I read that 0.080"is the limit on boring but since the 153 block looks exactly like a 181, so I'm gambling that another 0.0225" cut for 4" bore is possible.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2015
  26. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 2,548

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    With the six cylinders .060 is considered the safe limit. I don't know if the fours have a thicker wall. I would bet that the 181 is different.
     
  27. Since the 181 is an industrial engine it might be different (thicker walls) but Dennis is working with a 153 block. I wouldn't push my luck.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  28. NORSON
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 461

    NORSON
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Don't know if anyone has mentioned it but the small chevy (153) uses 283 pistons. I used fueler pistons in mine. Can't remember which bank. No problem with clearance. Used marine pan (rear sump) and marine dist. centrifugal advance. (mess with the weights and springs). I had it in a MityMite 4x4.
    Norm
     
  29. Phil1934
    Joined: Jun 24, 2001
    Posts: 2,608

    Phil1934
    Member

    283 is 3" stroke. 153 is 3-1/4".
     
  30. NORSON
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 461

    NORSON
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You use the 153 rods. the pin to deck height (except the dome) is the same.
    Norm
     

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