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Projects '33 5w Build Thread

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by CTaulbert, Oct 27, 2018.

  1. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    It's been a while since I updated this thread, so here comes a photo dump.....

    I was ready to start engine and trans mounts, so I got the two married together and hoisted into the frame. It was a balancing act between radiator clearance and torsion bar crossmember clearance. When I bolted on the side aprons, I discovered a problem I did not anticipate - the exhaust manifolds were going to protrude into the hood sides. I knew my torsion bar crossmember was going to make the engine sit higher, but I didn't realize that I needed to keep the engine lower, positioning the exhaust manifolds in the blisters of the side aprons.

    I pulled the oil pan to see if I could notch the front, but found my pan to already be shallow in that area. With no other alternative available, I got the cutoff wheel out and removed the torsion bar crossmember. With that out of the way, the engine came down, fitting where it needed to be.

    The torsion bars are still on, but I'm going to have to go to "version 2" of the system. While I contemplate that, I decided to push on with engine and trans mounts.
     
  2. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    With the engine and trans blocked up in place, I decided to get the front suspension mostly squared away. The front wishbone was already split on this car, but I decided to redo it to a little better standard. I made some new frame mounts, slightly inboard, so that the wishbone plane matches the bottom of the frame rail plane.
    001.jpg

    With that done, I fitted a pair of squareback spindles on the Ansen dropped '32 axle. I dropped the steering arms to get the tierod and draglink below the wishbones, since I wouldn't have the clearance under the crank pulley to go on top.

    I picked up a pair of '46-48 front Lincoln brakes a while back, so I got to fitting those on these spindles. It required a little more modifications to the spindles that I originally thought, but I was able to get everything married together.
    003.jpg 002.jpg
     
  3. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I made a new tierod and draglink out of chromoly tubing, which allowed me to locate the Saginaw 140 steering box. With the box located, I got to work on the engine mounts.

    Cadillacs have the odd three bolt pattern sort of like hemis, which make building purposeful looking brackets a little more difficult. I decided to build a symmetrical style bracket, using some bushings and sleeves from Welders Series.
    004.jpg 005.jpg

    With the engine mounted, I moved rearward to the transmission. My QuickTime bellhousing clocks the transmission 3 degrees over toward the drivers side. I made a drop out mount, that attaches hard to the transmission, but again uses Welders Series bushings and sleeves at the ends. The crossmember is flat on the bottom, with a wedge shape on the top to account for the slightly angled trans.
    006.jpg
     
  4. FOURTYDLX
    Joined: Feb 22, 2006
    Posts: 711

    FOURTYDLX
    Member

  5. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I wanted to build a torque box in the x-member to increase the torsional stiffness of the frame. It would mutli-task, serving as a point to attach the rear suspension, along with the master cylinders for the brakes and clutch.

    I had the pieces laser cut out, which made the fabrication go a lot easier.
    007.jpg

    With the crossmember in place, I got to work on the rear suspension. I picked up a pair of '37-40 wishbones, and shortened them to fit in the frame. I had @HotRodWorks narrow a pair of '40 axle tubes so that the rear end width would be the same as a '32-34 rear end. The slightly narrowed width allowed me to keep the wishbones mounting at the flanges, while still maintaining clearance to the frame rails.

    I had some custom bungs and pinch clamps machined to match the front wishbone bungs that I used to make, just in a larger size to accommodate the 3/4" rod ends, which are Johnny Joints from Currie.
    008.jpg 009.jpg 010.jpg
     
  6. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    With that fabrication done, the garage was in need of a cleaning, so I rolled the jig outside for a look afar. Overall, I'm pretty happy with how things are coming together.

    Next on the agenda are sorting out the pedal assembly mechanicals to facilitate both hydraulic brakes and clutch. I need to build a torque arm to take the load off the split wishbones too. Once that's done, I'll get back on fitting the torsion bars in the frame.

    With the jig outside, I climbed the ladder to grab a couple Rickman style shots.
    011.jpg 012.jpg 013.jpg
     
    kadillackid, Graham08, Stogy and 18 others like this.
  7. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    When I got this car, it had a new Tanks fuel tank, which I planned to reuse. With the quickchange in place, the tank needed a notch to fit back in the frame.

    I did a rough cut to allow the tank to fit back in the frame before marking out a final cut line.
    014.jpg 015.jpg
     
    Graham08, Dave Mc, Stogy and 15 others like this.
  8. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I wanted to rebuild the pedal assembly to make it the best that it can be. In the past, I've always used the reproduction pedal bushings that all of the aftermarket parts houses sell, but no matter how well I try to fit them, it seems that my pedals always have a little side to side wobble to them.

    This time around, I wanted to find a better solution. After browsing the McMaster Carr catalog, I found some bronze oilite bushings that had the correct 15/16" OD to fit the Ford pedals. The width was a little too wide, but that was easy to solve. The ID however was 3/4" rather than 7/8".

    The 7/8" shaft is probably overkill, so I decided to just downsize to the 3/4" shaft to make those bushings work. I picked up a pair of 3/4" shaft collars from McMaster to replace the collars on the stock pedal box, and I also got a case hardened, chromed, 3/4" shaft too. With the collars replaced, and the bushings fit, the pedal assembly works extremely smoothly.....but most importantly, there's no more side to side wobble!

    Next up, I'll modify the pedal arms to correct the ratios......
    IMG_9657.JPG IMG_9658.JPG IMG_9660.JPG
     
  9. AmishMike
    Joined: Mar 27, 2014
    Posts: 464

    AmishMike
    Member

    Has been a while since u posted & I am blown away by this master piece. Artwork!
     
  10. 31Apickup
    Joined: Nov 8, 2005
    Posts: 2,311

    31Apickup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Very nice, too bad about having to redo the torsion bar set up, but we all end of having redo stuff. Best to make it right than to compromise and not be happy later.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Stogy, CTaulbert, loudbang and 2 others like this.
  11. Always nice to see your thread pop up in my watch list! Beautiful work!
     
  12. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 30,456

    loudbang
    Member

    I'm amazed that you made a "miscalculation". :rolleyes: That just proves you are a human being like us I was beginning to think this was being made by those computer robots it's so perfect. :)
     
    Stogy, 1-SHOT, catdad49 and 2 others like this.
  13. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    While I'm sorting out the pedal assembly, I worked on a torque arm in the background. Instead of fabricating one from scratch, or from a wishbone, I decided to get one machined.

    I created a quick rear suspension model in CAD, and got to work designing an arm that would fit in that packaging. I came up with a tapered arm design, that has some draft angles to make it look more like a cast piece.
    03.jpg 04.jpg

    I then had it machined from 6061. Now, I just need to make some brackets that will weld to the RH axle bell and RH wishbone to formally put it in place.
    01.jpg
    02.jpg
     
  14. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,143

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Cory, that's some "Tall" workmanship, you make it look easy !
     
  15. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    Thanks Marty - that means a lot!
     
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  16. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I wrapped up the pedal assembly yesterday. That project was pretty involved, with a lot of small projects adding up to actual brake stuff. I first needed to c-notch the rear rails, so that I could determine how far the wishbones swing upward during full suspension travel. With my packaging envelope now known, I got to work correcting the pedals ratios, at the pedals. Then, I moved to the rear to mount the master cylinders.

    I used my rear suspension crossmember to hang them. I drilled and sleeved all of the holes for the master cylinders, allowing me to use long through bolts to attach everything. With those in place, I began designing bell cranks to turn the pulling motion into a pushing motion. Since I already corrected the pedal ratios, the bell cranks could simply be 1:1. The linkage is built from chromoly tubing, with some weld-in bungs allowing easy adjustment.

    It was tight packaging, but everything actuates very smoothly. I used teflon lined rod ends, and bronze oilite bushings, so the whole system should be relatively maintenance free.

    106088938_10100279566094639_2184602749071803189_o.jpg 106100397_10100279565999829_5192803997897525106_o.jpg 106457994_10100279566054719_5186804744712063935_o.jpg 106736751_10100279565944939_4992280272389742784_o.jpg
     
  17. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I got the torque arm formally mounted. I made a simple single shear bracket for the RH axle bell, along with a double shear bracket for the RH wishbone. I double checked my driveline angles, then welded the brackets in place. It should handle that Cadillac torque well!
    106581069_10100280026990999_2110938159290859433_o.jpg 107096125_10100280026901179_4924417872883161337_o.jpg 107602696_10100280026936109_9088192787695473917_o.jpg
     
    Graham08, Mat Thrasher, brEad and 7 others like this.
  18. flamedabone
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,810

    flamedabone
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If you keep practicing, you just might get the hang of the whole fabrication thing someday....

    Just kidding of course, your work is nothing less that stellar.

    -Abone.
     
  19. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 16,837

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Art in Metal...Thanks for helping make this place THE Place to be...You are truly a gifted Talent @CTaulbert
     
  20. I love using those oilite bushings. And, you torque arm is a work of art. I would totally buy one if they were offered for sale.
     
    loudbang, kidcampbell71 and CTaulbert like this.
  21. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    Remember when there used to be a lot of build threads going on?
     
    cactus1, loudbang and Stogy like this.
  22. I have become more active lately and have been impressed with the cars being built. Lots of us just got busy with life, family, OT cars etc in the last years.
     
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  23. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,863

    alchemy
    Member

    Are the master cylinders under your seat now? Is the seat going to be a bench with a flip up bottom? Or just scoot fore or back out of the way?
     
    Stogy and loudbang like this.
  24. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    I think the ease of using Instagram to document a build has probably killed build threads more than anything. I'll admit, I do more updates there than here because it's more user friendly.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  25. I am on there but hate it. To brief and impersonal
     
    Stogy likes this.
  26. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    They should fall under the seat. I'll build a stock style seat frame, where the bottom cushion can flip up/out, so the access will be easy from the top side.
     
    Stogy, brEad and loudbang like this.
  27. Mind sharing your Instagram handle?
     
  28. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    My handle is ctaulbert there as well.

    For those who don't have an Instagram account, this link will take you to my profile:
    https://www.instagram.com/ctaulbert/?hl=en
     
    brEad likes this.
  29. chop job
    Joined: Feb 16, 2013
    Posts: 581

    chop job
    Member
    from Wisconsin
    1. WISCONSON HAMBERS

    OK I have to ask this How are you going to change gears in that quick change without dropping the gas tank?
     
  30. CTaulbert
    Joined: Apr 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,148

    CTaulbert
    Member
    from Detroit

    Realistically, you're going to jack the car up (to get underneath it), so you could let the axle drop down with some jack stands under the frame. The gears are 1 3/8" wide, and there is enough clearance to sneak them out between the Halibrand case and the gas tank.

    Even more realistically, I bet 95% of quickchange owners never change gear sets....myself included.
     
    brEad, loudbang, Kato Kings and 3 others like this.

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