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292 y-block pistons: a strange idea

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by yblockhead, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. yblockhead
    Joined: May 8, 2008
    Posts: 59

    yblockhead
    Member

    looks like the silvolite 3214 would work even better with the 292 rod, it would get you up into 11:1 compression with stock 3.5l v6 chrysler pistons, 316 CI displacement.
    those pistons are available out to 3.84", and are ebay cheap. would have to machine 0.045 off the piston to create a quench area though, and ream the original ford bushing.
    maybe time to see how much a offset ground crank would cost!
    john
     
  2. yblockhead
    Joined: May 8, 2008
    Posts: 59

    yblockhead
    Member

    heres a pic of the buick pistons assembled to C2AE rods. I used Wristpin P-2260 from Sealed power. The Conrods had to be narrowed a little bit, about 0.100", and the piston has to be honed out 0.028"
     

    Attached Files:

  3. wicked willys
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 82

    wicked willys
    Member
    from ne ohio

    I'm not trying to discredit what you are doing. I love your ingenuity. I'm all for cheap. I just wonder how much you will save, given all the machine work involved, over ordering a custom piston fo your desired cr.
     
  4. Pir8Darryl
    Joined: Jan 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,488

    Pir8Darryl
    Member

    Custom pistons are running $850-900, so overall it's about even money, but going with lighter stronger rods and adding CID's to the package has benefits over and above just a custom set of pistons
     
  5. wicked willys
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 82

    wicked willys
    Member
    from ne ohio

    I can dig that. Hope it all works out for ya.
     
  6. Hollow Head
    Joined: Nov 6, 2007
    Posts: 64

    Hollow Head
    Member
    from Finland

    How about Ford Pinto 3.810" pistons with 1.090" pin height and flathead 7.000" Scat H-beam connecting rods?
    http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=SRP-148218&autoview=sku

    Ok, is there enough material to drill those rods from .750" pins to .927 pins and bushings?
    http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=SCA-6700&autoview=sku

    Big end size is ok cause you can get those rods with 2.000" and 2.138" rod journal sizes. Flathead rods big end width is .865" and y-blocks width is like .862".
    This would be very light combination and would have a huge rod to stroke ratio 2.12!
    Those pistons weight only 337 grams each and stock Y-block pistons weight about 555 grams each.

    But that ain't cheap anymore. Ok, you can get those rods cheaper from various places and you really don't need forged pistons?

    Just some fresh thoughts...
     
  7. I heard a rumour and dont know if anyone here can verify it but apparently a 283 Chev piston can be uused in a oversize 312 bore. 3.850 +

    Can anyone verify a 283 piston diameter???:confused:
     
  8. yblockhead
    Joined: May 8, 2008
    Posts: 59

    yblockhead
    Member

    283 bore is 3.875....312 is 3.80 ... so you would have to overbore the 312 0.075". not outrageous.
    the deck heights are close, the 283 is 1.779, while the fords are 1.760.


    the fords are 0.040" in the hole, while the chev would be 0.021" in the hole.

    You still have a problem with pin and rod diameter mismatch, same as with the buick pistons. The buicks go up to 3.860, while they are zero deck @ 1.800.

    The problem is you would have to ream the y block brass bushings and find a floating 283 ($$$) piston to get things to work with the original floating pin rods. Or use a press fit piston pin and do the same thing i did ...get rid of the bushing entirely and convert to pressed in.

    but then you would end up with the same cost and less compression than the buick piston.
     
  9. krooser
    Joined: Jul 25, 2004
    Posts: 4,585

    krooser
    Member

    Geez...My Hemi Venolia's cost just over $700.00 with pins and Total Seal rings...
     
  10. DE SOTO
    Joined: Jan 20, 2006
    Posts: 3,857

    DE SOTO
    Member

    Is this thing running yet ?

    I am about to put a Y-Block together and might need to do this.

    Post up some more info on this swap.
     
  11. yblockhead
    Joined: May 8, 2008
    Posts: 59

    yblockhead
    Member

    its in the car, but hasnt been started yet. ended up as a 9.1:1 302 cu Y block. Should have it all set in a month or 2
     
  12. Archangel007
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 4

    Archangel007
    Member

    Champion,

    Any news?

    I too am looking to rebuild my Y for supercharged application and I would love to know how you got on.

    Cheers,
    Tricky
     
  13. jakdad
    Joined: Oct 22, 2008
    Posts: 2

    jakdad
    Member
    from Texas

    I built a 292 with .060 over 312 pistons. Isky RPM 300 cam. Street motor, worked out great. This combo puts the bore at 3.86. Good luck.
     
  14. 461/2ton
    Joined: Feb 17, 2007
    Posts: 76

    461/2ton
    Member

    Blockhead, I ran onto this old thread while looking for something else. How did the project work out?
     
  15. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,819

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    bump, lets see it!
     
  16. rumblefish
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 77

    rumblefish
    Member
    from NE Ohio

    Bump......lets here about the build please!
     
  17. anteek
    Joined: Feb 27, 2009
    Posts: 394

    anteek
    Member

    Add me to the list of the curious. I have a latham that needs a long block under it.
     
  18. yblockhead
    Joined: May 8, 2008
    Posts: 59

    yblockhead
    Member

    arrgh.. its still not started.. i ended up with a ford 8.8 " out back, a mustang t-5 manual , etc etc.. all that had to be fitted before i started it. I pretty much finished the driveline to the rest of the '41 before i got around to starting it. still remaining: wire fuel pump and oil prime engine.
    I did crand it over with the starter.. everything turns over fine with the valves adjusted, etc.
     
  19. digspeed
    Joined: Dec 13, 2008
    Posts: 3

    digspeed
    Member
    from nebraska

    I see by the date of the last entry that some time has passed. Have you had any success in getting your y-block running? I have a '56 f100 with an engine in need of a rebuild. I like how you have found a piston that not only fits the bore, but also raises the piston to zero deck. My last build was a 331 Cadillac that I decked .095 to get the piston to zero deck. The engine operates flawlessly and loves the added compression. Please let me know how everything went together, and how the engines operates as I am getting ready for the build.
    Thank you,
    Speed
     
  20. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    I'd like to hear more about this deal as well. Subscribed.
     
  21. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 5,021

    sunbeam
    Member

    I have done this many times. To zero deck assemble the short block less cam and rings and deck the engine and turn each piston to tdc when the cutter is over it. Run a .040 head gasket
     
  22. GOATROPER02
    Joined: Mar 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,059

    GOATROPER02
    Member
    from OHIO


    Please tell me your joking???


    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  23. CNC-Dude
    Joined: Nov 23, 2007
    Posts: 891

    CNC-Dude
    Member

    Sometimes you can just tell they're not....
     
  24. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,622

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    Never did that, but to be truthful I have thought about it.
    The problems I see are; you would have to keep the piston from rocking and you would have a lot of grit (iron and aluminum) to deal with.

    I guess there is no easy way to do something right.

    It certainly would assure a "0" deck!
     
  25. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 5,021

    sunbeam
    Member

    I'm not joking. I can't lay claim to the idea I was used in a Hot Rod Mag. build. It equalizes all cylinders with way less work and expense. What's the difference between cutting the pistons on a mill or a lathe. Most of the time I'm cutting the deck until it skims all the pistons using a degree wheel to make sure that they all come to tdc. Then pull the engine back apart and send it to be balanced.
     
  26. Any word on the Y-block?
     
  27. GOATROPER02
    Joined: Mar 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,059

    GOATROPER02
    Member
    from OHIO



    As was said above.....first the piston is not held tight in the bore so it will not cut square and rattle around.....

    Next is the fact that a block is supposed to be machined off of the main centerline.......

    And the real problem is the chips and abrassive that have to get between the piston and wall.....and then your turning the engine over embedding garbage into the skirts as well as scratching the walls......and we wont even talk about junking a set of bearings........where is the way less work and expence?
    Once trash is stuck in the aluminum it is near impossable to remove....and this is the fastest way to tear up a new set of cylinder walls and rings..
    And yes this applyies to street and hotrod engines as well....not just race

    We spend a lot of time with cylinder wall finishes,torque plates and most important CLEAN.


    Sunbeam.....Im not writing this as an attack or anything personal..... saving money on a build is fine....TO A POINT....then one must draw a line

    Tony
     
  28. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    The last time the OP was active on this site was 8 months ago, so he probably isn't hearing the questions. It would be interesting to hear how it worked out, though.
     
  29. Ole don
    Joined: Dec 16, 2005
    Posts: 2,915

    Ole don
    Member

    FYI, the last two Y blocks I put together needed .030 to .035 taken off the top of the blocks to get the pistons up to the top. Usually one measurement on one end, and another on the other end. I measure all head gaskets I remove. They are almost all .044 to .045 at the fire ring.
     
  30. CNC-Dude
    Joined: Nov 23, 2007
    Posts: 891

    CNC-Dude
    Member

    When people set about to check deck, most of the time they only understand half of the process, and that is the part of getting the piston to TDC. But its the other half of the process that they don't know that is the most important. And that is that the pistons need to be rocked from side to side, and that the piston height at the quench and spark plug sides of the pistons when you rock them are what establishes how much you cut off of the pistons, not across the center of the piston at TDC. You often have to mill off more on one side of the piston than the other to achieve the right "zero" deck. The pistons can actually rock and stick out of the cylinder bores by .010" or more if you don't(depending on how much piston clearance you have), and that coupled with a paper thin head gasket can be a big mistake.
     

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