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Technical 283 Chevy

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by HOTRODPRIMER, May 26, 2020.

  1. Since all this social distancing and staying home crap started I have been cleaning up, rearranging, sorting and throwing away junk I will never use but I have had this 283 sbc under the work bench since the late 70's.

    I decided to take the engine apart since I didn't know the condition and there seems to be a lot of wear so there was no doubt it with have to have to resize the cylinders - but after talking to my pal Jerry it appears I'm going ave to sleeve two cylinders after he vatted and checked it out.

    What is the consensus on sleeving a block, I'm not going to try and build a high horse power engine just a good reliable one. HRP
     
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  2. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 4,725

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Well if you can get a deal on the machining I suppose it would be worth it. Are you going to be able to get all the cylinders the same size ? What’s the wear in the other six cylinders? Do you have a project in mind?
     
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  3. Hombre
    Joined: Aug 22, 2008
    Posts: 1,029

    Hombre
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Danny, I went thru this on one of my 392 Hemi's. Block was way over size .125 and had two pretty bad cylinders. I thought I would just have the block sleeved all eight holes, it wasn't going to be cheap but I would end up with a standard bore 392. Must have talked to a dozen machine shops in and around close to were I live, then I went national and talked to a dozen more shops all over the east side of the country. None of them, not a one, would even consider sleeving all of the cylinders. They all said it distorts the block way to far to sleeve them all. I did end up sleeving the two bad cylinders and then had the block pressure tested. It checked out just fine, don't have that motor running yet but it is next in line.

    So from my experiance you will be just fine sleeving a couple of bad cylinders, and you get to save another old engine. good Luck !
     
  4. My friend Jerry has been building engines since he was a teenager, he has a huge shop in his back yard with more equipment than your average pro shop, for years he was the NAPA machinist and has been self employed for the last 40 years.

    Jerry has built 11 engines for me over the years, some stock and some on the wild side, From flatheads, to hemi's to sbc, he is a well respected guy here in town, I'm sure he would make the cylinders the same and I believe he will treat me fair.

    I have a good transmission and a 9" ford rear axle, a new set of '32 Frame rails, a set of 16" Forty Ford wheels and various other parts, I'm not in a rush and I don't have a body but I have a hiboy in mind, Model A coupe,sedan or roadster, a '32 roadster body would be nice< I do have a lot of parts like a firewall,radiator shell and hood.

    Right now I'm just concentration on the idea of a rolling chassis. HRP
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2020
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  5. What size are the bores at now? What casting # is block? You may be able to make a 302 with out sleeving.
     
  6. It all depends on what it might cost you for a decent core, right?

    283 core or just a bare block is going to be far far far less than 392 block. Makes more sense to sleeve a hole or 2 on a 392 block than a 283.

    Take it out to 4” and build a 301
     
  7. Sonic test walls?
     
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  8. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 3,849

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have had a couple of 327's sleeved but only one/two cylinders. Both were fine afterward. Ran great for years. Had a 283 that hydrolocked and scarred a cylinder--had that one sleeved as well-no problems but 283 blocks are plentiful and will take a bore without heating but 301 can get iffy sometimes..Have had a few 060 over 283's with no issues.
     
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  9. tractorguy
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 642

    tractorguy
    Member

    What is the actual reason for needing sleeves ? Are there cracks in cylinder walls ? Very deep gouges or damage ? Guess I scratch my head since old 283 engines can be bored way out and gazillions have been without actually needing to sleeve a cylinder. Just curious
     
  10. Cracks between 2 cylinders, to be totally honest I really wasn't paying attention to which cylinders I was thinking it was going to be a boat anchor after he told me that. HRP
     
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  11. flatford39
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 2,560

    flatford39
    Member

    I had my 49 Merc block sleeved on one cylinder. Think it was number one if I remember right. It cost right around $100.00 at my machinist. It was pitted badly and couldn't be bored clean so in went the sleeve. Didn't the 39 flatheads come from the factory with all 8 cylinders sleeved???
     
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  12. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 13,450

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    My 327/350 hp Nova engine has one sleeve in it, never was concerned but you definitely need to have a capable engine guy you can trust.
     
  13. brokedownbiker
    Joined: Jun 7, 2016
    Posts: 508

    brokedownbiker
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I bought a motor from a guy back in the late 80's, a freshly rebuilt 327 shortblock that had three sleeved cylinders. It went into a '67 C10 4 speed truck, never had a problem with it. I didn't hot rod around with it, just drove it regular as a daily driver. I think you will be fine with it.
     
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  14. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,166

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Why does it have to be a 283 and does it have to be that one? I would be looking for another engine, 305s are plentiful and cheap, if you really want a 283 there are still quite a few around. From your description I take it this is not a matching numbers restoration of a 57 Fuelie Vette.
     
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  15. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 4,725

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Well it sounds like you are in the cat birds seat having Jerry as your friend. That is a HUGE plus. No loss of sleep at night so go for it.:) Sounds like a good foundation for a project .
     
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  16. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 4,725

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    I was going to suggest finding another block at first as well, but every man has their personal reasons from just because “I have it” to some sort of attachment. Me , personally I have an affection for Chevy inliners and 283’s over a 305/350.
     
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  17. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 26,954

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The 350 that I ran in my 48 had one hole sleeved but even in 1980 I could have bought a decent 350 block for the 120 bucks it cost to sleeve that one hole.
    Unless the block has special heirloom value I'd find another block and a good bare 327 block could turn into a nifty little 301 real easy with your 283 crank and a new set of pistons.
     
  18. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,681

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    I have never seen it done on a gas V-8, but on old ag & utility tractors (backhoes, skip loaders, etc), both gas & diesel, it's very common for the engines to all have dry sleeves from the factory on smaller engines, and wet sleeves on most all larger ones. They are always replaced during a rebuild, the pistons & sleeves come as a kit.
     
  19. Danny, when I was in Technical College back in 1992-1994, I had a 350 from an old C-20. It had a pocket in the casting that we didn’t find until we had started boring it out. My instructor was the former department head of the defunct college diesel program. He suggested that we just sleeve the block. I think the sleeve cost me 20 bucks and that block went on to be the block for my bracket racing engine. 7300 RPM through the traps every weekend. Never gave the sleeve a second thought. I also had an old 300 Ford with sleeves in every hole, Jasper reman and it never gave trouble either. In fact, it used to tow the bracket car!


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  20. cracks between cylinders means quit while you're ahead to me. You're describing the deck being cracked. Is that correct?
     
  21.  
  22. i

    The reason behind wanting to use this particular 283 is because a close & now departed friend gave me the engine, sentiment no other reason. HRP
     
  23. 1946caddy
    Joined: Dec 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,665

    1946caddy
    Member
    from washington

    I wouldn't waste my time and money on a 283 unless it was a factory dual four or fuel injected engine.
     
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  24. jim snow
    Joined: Feb 16, 2007
    Posts: 1,011

    jim snow
    Member

    Take your pal Jerry’s word. It sounds like he is a stand up guy and will treat you right.jmho. Snowman
     
  25. louisb
    Joined: Oct 13, 2008
    Posts: 982

    louisb
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    We sleeved all 8 cylinders on my 59L Flathead block. 283s are still pretty common so it would be cheaper to find a different block. But it’s not always about the money.

    —louis
     
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  26. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 13,450

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    Or the very desirable Chevy II 283 block!
     
  27. brokedownbiker
    Joined: Jun 7, 2016
    Posts: 508

    brokedownbiker
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    And that is all the reason you need.
     
  28. Well there you go,
    Sleeve it and get to going. No other engine is going to be the one your friend gave you. You’re going with big dome pistons right ?
     
  29. Danny,
    Understand the dear friend thing.. But cost over getting a different block is like night and day,
    Make a coffee table out of it for the man cave and it will live forever...

    00w0w_4A1DKDndTYa_600x450.jpg
     
  30. old.hot.rodder
    Joined: Oct 13, 2012
    Posts: 161

    old.hot.rodder
    Member

    looking for a correct block for my 59 corvette was not an easy task. Found one that needed a sleeve because water setting in the block for many years. I was nervous but sleeved it during the bore and rebuild. It has been 23 years now without a problem. It is about DSC06827.JPG how good is the machine shop?
     

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