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Projects '23 Model T Gow Job

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by guitarguy, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. Gotcha- the Chevrolet 4 doesn't use cam bearings... but that doesn't mean I can't find something that fits :D
     
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  2. dumprat
    Joined: Dec 27, 2006
    Posts: 2,866

    dumprat
    Member
    from b.c.

    I like seeing the process involved in all the old machining.

    I would be hard pressed to not just put needle bearings in everything and surprise the shit outa people when you can rev the thing to 7grand!
     
    kevinrevin and guitarguy like this.
  3. I love the work! I'm still trying to finish up the frame and mounts on my T.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  4. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    No explanation needed. Just some totally bitchin' inspiration going on here today.

    Speedster project 265.1.jpg

    Speedster project 266.1.jpg
     
    winduptoy, Dannerr, OFT and 17 others like this.
  5. dumprat
    Joined: Dec 27, 2006
    Posts: 2,866

    dumprat
    Member
    from b.c.

  6. I like it a lot! Excellent...
     
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  7. rwrj
    Joined: Jan 30, 2009
    Posts: 640

    rwrj
    Member
    from SW Ga

    Wow. That looks just right. Good job.
     
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  8. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    Only a little progress, Put my early 30's hubs on the brake lathe today and cleaned up the edges.

    Speedster project 268.1.jpg
     
    winduptoy, Dannerr and David Mazza like this.
  9. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 110

    Kevin Pharis

    Don’t know that I’ve ever seen deuce drums turned out that far... you may have affected the breaking performance! ;):p
     
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  10. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    We have a major flow disruption going on over here.......

    Speedster project 283.1.jpg
     
  11. winduptoy and guitarguy like this.
  12. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,293

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Many years ago, (1957) we had a local machine shop in San Jose that used to do lots of T, A, V8 modification.
    I had some flathead work done, prior to getting my Calif. drivers license.
    They bored and ported/relieved my 59L block, and offset ground my Merc crank in-house, for 29-A rods.
    I noted the 4 banger work, but at 15 was yet to appreciate the potential of a loaded 'banger.
    My Mom had two Model A's, both 'supe jobs', performed by Indy mechanic Pete Dias...way before I was born.
    Oh, the machine shop was "Babbit Bearing", by name...Think it lasted 'til early '60s.
     
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  13. flyin-t
    Joined: Dec 29, 2004
    Posts: 1,330

    flyin-t
    Member

    Love the look of the B manifold!
     
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  14. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    Thanks @Atwater Mike , I love old stories like that. 20 years ago I was far from interested in pre-war cars--I was a Mopar musclecar nut, but more on the race side of things. Now I cant get enough of the early cars. I know most people on this site are post war fans and builds, but there is something very special about pre-war stuff....especially if your mostly trying to be accurate to that time period.

    @flyin-t , Besides two of my friends, your the only one in the public that commented on the B manifold. The truth is I absolutely love the look of the triples. But putting them all on active duty would be a disaster. While it's probable to do, not likely with this combo, so I'll just fake it with one center carb and two dummies on the end, but I have to keep that menacing look. This is for my "other" engine anyhow. The Fronty short block should be back within a week or so.
     
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  15. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 2,343

    RodStRace
    Member

    Yeah, that looks like the equivalent of putting a Dominator on a V6!
     
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  16. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    LOL, that's about right. But you can't deny the look.

    Love the conversations this is sparking.
     
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  17. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,174

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Perhaps a Graham supercharger on a flathead T?
     
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  18. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    @MrModelT Suggested that last year when we texted. I'll stick with the 7:5-1, Fronty headed engine, I'm sure that will be enough to push this bucket of bolts faster than I am brave. I've seen the Aldrich Roadster in person, the fact he ran that thing at near 100 mph had to be a white knuckle ride. My ride being built in similar fashion would probably scare me at a lesser speed.
     
  19. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    OK, a smattering of pictures from the one machinist. The engine is all crated back up, and will leave this week and on its way back to me. With any luck, I may have it by the end of the week, at the least early next week.

    Then its on to my own machinist for some finish up work....then I can assemble the short block for good. So much more to do. The tally is getting pretty high for a 60 HP engine. Kind of scary actually.

    So anyhow, the mains were bored

    Speedster project 273.1.jpeg


    Oil grooves cut:

    Speedster project 278.1.jpeg

    Speedster project 276.1.jpeg


    Then, the crank was finally able to live in its home:

    Speedster project 281.1.jpeg


    Reaming out the rear cam bearing:

    Speedster project 287.1.jpeg



    The spare crank I had done, just in case. I definitely don't think I could trust anyone around here to do this work. Lets see if I can remember all that was done....

    Turned snout down to accept T timing gear (Dan McEachern gear)
    Shortened front main to move the gear back to T spec
    Modified gear key
    Turned snout down to have sleeve installed for smooth front seal running
    Shortened front of snout and re-radiused the threaded hole for the ratchet nut
    Turned mains to 1.590"
    Turned rods to cleanup the journals 1.475" (.025" undersize)
    Rear of crank is stock length, not shortened like most of conversions.

    Speedster project 289.1.jpeg
     
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  20. rwrj
    Joined: Jan 30, 2009
    Posts: 640

    rwrj
    Member
    from SW Ga

    Wow. That's all. Just wow.
     
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  21. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    This isn't your grandfather's Model T.....

    And yes, I agree, it's cool as hell.
     
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  22. I love this build! I just got my block in my garage, with the crank and caps... I gotta clean it up, but once my parts come in from Canada, I'll be up and going... I found a guy who has great deals on T parts in the great north.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  23. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    Update in time for Christmas, I received my A crank conversion back.

    Speedster project 292.1.jpg

    Speedster project 293.1.jpg


    But alas, this is the end of the outside games until next year, I managed to get it all tarped up good for winter, so now I move onto indoor projects. Don't you love back yard builds?

    Speedster project 294.1.jpg
     
  24. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,174

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Damn...what's all that white stuff? Here in SoCal we haven't had any rain for what seems like forever. Pack up some of that and send it out here before we dry up and blow away.
     
  25. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    HaHa, its called seasonal change. It what happens when you don't live below the 40* Latitude. I was relatively lucky, ended up with 2 feet, possibly a couple inches more. Down near the NY/PA boarder some first hand accounts said 40-43".

    Yes, I hear you on the water, my parents live in southern Utah. It has been dry there forever.

    As I told one of my friends, the seasonal changes are nice, winter forces you to put things up for a while and come spring time, you get anxious to get back on doing work outside. It's like a renewed interest every year. I have a 2.5 car garage with 3 cars already in it (2 OT cars and a stock Model T), so it's tight in there. Plan is to build a shed outside to keep one of the T's in it so everything is sheltered....but for now, with this car, I play in mother natures garage.
     
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  26. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    Lets start building an oil pan, Frontenac style. This is loosely based off a real Fronty pan, which are about as rare as hens teeth----even the small run of repop ones.

    So here we go, start with an stock old 3 dip oil pan and trim the excess off. Then have the local metal supply company bend up the bottom and sides of the pan from 12 gauge sheet steel. A friend has a repo pan so I based my measurements off his, so the pan is 8" deep.

    Speedster project 295.1.jpg



    Clean up the important parts

    Speedster project 296.1.jpg


    Start making a template for the front endcap:

    Speedster project 297.1.jpg


    And build it from plate steel:

    Speedster project 298.1.jpg


    Set the "pan" on top for a test fit...all is good:

    Speedster project 299.1.jpg


    After a couple of tack welds, start shaping the front sides to fit:

    Speedster project 300.1.jpg


    Getting there slowly:

    Speedster project 301.1.jpg

    Speedster project 302.1.jpg


    Now cut the excess from the original out as we only really need the pan rails and front snout:

    Speedster project 303.1.jpg
    Speedster project 304.1.jpg

    Speedster project 305.1.jpg
     
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  27. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    This will be a semi pressurized oil system (pressure mains, splash rods), and I was told I pretty much need to run a filter my the guy who did A crank conversion. No issues there as I have been thinking how to hide such things so it all looks right from the outside.

    Speedster project 306.1.jpg


    Test fitting with the A dip tray installed. Well shoot, I could have gone a little lower on the filter...so that will have to be fixed. But it all fits so far:

    Speedster project 307.1.jpg


    Marking out where the stock Model T 4 dip cover will go, I mean why reinvent the wheel right? lets use parts that are already made and save time and headaches....hopefully. I need to make a mark on the inside edge and cut it out. But first a few more things to do

    Speedster project 308.1.jpg


    And this is about as far as I am at the moment.
    I received my universal Canton Racing oil pickup today, kind of pricey but it saves me some fab time:

    Speedster project 309.1.jpg
     
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  28. guitarguy
    Joined: May 26, 2008
    Posts: 459

    guitarguy
    Member

    Thank You! It has been a heck of ride to get here so far.
     
  29. I would never of thought to put a filter inside the oil pan. Are you going to put in an access plate?
     

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