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1962 4 Speed transmission options

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by The37Kid, Dec 25, 2011.

  1. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Heo, I am pretty sure that you are right there, both on the Facel and the earlier 300.

    Facel used the French tranny (tough bastard, earlier used in trucks after the war). And Chrysler may have offered it in 1963; in '64 the A833 was available.

     
  2. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Thanks, man. Honestly, I think THIS is why the HAMB cuts off at '65. Up 'til then, winning a stoplight race or a drag race meant --- a COMBO of (1) your mill (be it FoMoCo flatty or whatever), (2) a tough tranny (whatever you could afford:D), THEN (3) your skill ;) as a driver. Meaning? A "hotrod," a car a local guy built out of his brain, will, a friendly junkyard owner or two, a couple o' buddies.

    That three-part formula for drag racing (I mean local) changed, what with so-called factory hotrods -- which, of course, we now call muscle cars.

    This why 37Kid's concept makes for one of the most exciting and HAMB-friendly threads I've seen. '62, nothing made, or cast, later.

    :cool:


     
  3. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,954

    The37Kid
    Member

    Thanks for setting the bar so high, guess I'll have to get moving on this project. I asked my son in law about a T-10, looks like his Dad may have a few.:)
     
  4. Studes had posi or "twin traction" in the 50's with the Dana 44's- my 56 truck came factory with one....also the 1960 Stude's got the T-10....my earlist Mopar 4 speed is date coded 4-12-63....

    think an early Ford 3sp with overdrive would be a good choice...just sayin...
     
  5. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Yup, in the U.S., it was Packard engineers who pioneers the LSD, which went by various marketing handles thereafter, depending on manufacturer.


    Bob, didn't mean to "pressure" you to speed up your project, buddy, :pas I know that part of YOUR enjoyment of the hobby is moving at your own pace -- "enjoying the ride," so to speak! :cool:

    It's just that it comes SO close to my dream project that slipped away for lack of money and a place to work, not to mention family and work issues.:( Life's like that, eh? :rolleyes: I had a good-running 4-speed '62 Hawk, plus a strong-running Hemi and a '32 Deuce three-window coupe body. I got THAT close. :eek: I still feel the sense of loss.

    I'm partial to 4-speeds over automatics. So, when I see someone planning to put a Hemi 4-speed setup into a coupe, I am on it like a moth to a flame! :D LOL. I guess you'd understand why.
     
  6. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    Just to add a few pertinent points:

    The first year Chevrolet had a limited slip differential was '57, and Pontiac followed in '58. Not sure about Studebaker. The first year for four speed equipped Chevrolet passenger cars was '59---yeah, yeah, I know that your stepfather's cousin's best friend bought a new '57 BelAir with a factory four speed. Show me some definitive proof. No one has yet. As stated, Pontiac got the four speed in '60. If you want a T-10 with the old look of cast iron, keep your eyes open for an aftermarket replacement T-10 with a G.M. pattern. I've got one I picked up at a swap meet with a cast case and tailstock but a 1980 date code.
     
  7. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Wow! No shit! LSD eh? I guess thats not too surprising, considering the styling of some of those late 50's Packards and studes...:eek::D:p
     
  8. oldcarfart
    Joined: Apr 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    oldcarfart
    Member

    T-5 with classic Hurst 4 speed knob, whose to know??
     
  9. oldcarfart
    Joined: Apr 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,437

    oldcarfart
    Member

    Have you ever driven a 3 speed OD unit? no 2nd gear panic shift issues, wind out 1st, lift up on gas for a mini-second just enough to release engine torque and wind out 1st OD then shift to 2nd OD then 3rd OD. You can drive all day in traffic with switching from 2nd to 2nd OD and back again with no clutch action as trans reverts back to non-OD below 35 mph and will free wheel coast with no decel. My '55 stude with 3.73 gears would pull 85 mph in 1st OD, so you launch, lift gas and re apply at about 35-40mph, wind out to 80-85 then shift to 2nd with shifter, so no shifter action until 80+ mph!!!!
     
  10. joel
    Joined: Oct 10, 2009
    Posts: 1,858

    joel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    STUDE BW with the input shaft shortened and the end turned down to fit Chevy pilot bearing; it has an iron case. Many walked out the back door of Studebaker in the late 50s. Some people believed the cases were stronger than the aluminum version. My project is '68 and back because thats when I bought the engine Hopup parts.
     
  11. jrlemke
    Joined: Dec 20, 2009
    Posts: 83

    jrlemke
    Member

    Studebaker introduced the T-10 4-spd in '61. The '61 and 1st 200 '62's had the Chev pattern. Late '62 'till '64 used the Ford pattern. The input shaft was different than G.M. or Ford, but can be modified to work. Also, the trans. pilot dia. was about .010" smaller. Jim
     
  12. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,954

    The37Kid
    Member

    Done deal, the project is getting a T-10 from 1962 or before. Next step is picking out the Hurst shifter.
     
  13. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Got one through the son in law?
     
  14. BAD PENNY
    Joined: Aug 22, 2011
    Posts: 1,247

    BAD PENNY
    Member
    from mass

    If it were me I'd get a Hurst with the removable handle and run an early 60's Impala handle with the small plain white knob. They have a cool swan neck shape. On another note...my brother in-law lives in Ridgefield Ct. on Shadow Lane. Some incredible antique homes in that area. Small world (wouldn't want to paint it)
     
  15. TexasSpeed
    Joined: Nov 2, 2009
    Posts: 4,618

    TexasSpeed
    Member

    I know what you're talking about. That's a great idea actually. This gets my vote.


    iPhone - TJJ app
     
  16. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas



    I thought the A833 was a New Process design. Anyway, the A833 was used until the mid 80's. GM picked it up for its trucks. The earlier design was still the Chrysler bolt pattern and the later were aluminum GM pattern.

    I know you are going with a T-10, just offering up some more useful 4spd info.
     
  17. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    The hurst round stick Impala handle is really pretty, and would probably clear the seat, as it sweeps forward as it comes out of the floor. Bet if you find one, it wont be cheap though...
     
  18. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    A833 new process debuted in '64, too new. Good trans though.
     
  19. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    I know, just saying for others looking at this thread for 4spd info. I stumbled upon a good 833 deal and did a lot of research on it.
     
  20. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,954

    The37Kid
    Member

    Bad Penny, If you want to see the world get smaller here is Hastings Foote in his Type 38 Bugatti that lived on Shadow Lane in the late 1930's. He also had a Ford flathead powered race car. Both long gone, but a friend did pull a 1923 Austro Daimler out of his garage in the late 1950's.
     

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  21. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,954

    The37Kid
    Member

    That Swan necked Impala shifter sounds nice, does anyone have a photo or part number? This turned into a great thread, thank you everyone. Bob
     
  22. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Bit hard to see with the steering wheel in the way, but this will give you the idea. Real pretty shifter. This is actually a '61, but the shifters are the same.
     

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  23. stuart in mn
    Joined: Nov 22, 2007
    Posts: 1,913

    stuart in mn
    Member

    The factory shifters were made by Inland, and the handle wasn't removable. Here's a photo of the original shifter out of my Bonneville, it was essentially the same as the one used in the Impala.

    [​IMG]

    I believe you can get an aftermarket shift handle today for a Hurst that looks like it.
     

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  24. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    The '61-'62 style shift handles are reproduced with a two bolt plate that's intended to be used with a Hurst Competition Plus shifter and are sold (the last I knew) by the Late Great Chevy Club. I bought one a few years back for my '61 Catalina project.
     
  25. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    The other thing I was going to suggest was making your own handle. I'm guessing you have access to a lathe, you could take a piece of 1/2'' rod, taper the last third of it, cut a thread on the end, bend it to whatever shape you like, then heat and hammer the other end flat, drill two holes in it, and plate it.
     
  26. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

  27. BCR
    Joined: Dec 11, 2005
    Posts: 1,262

    BCR
    Member

    What Hurst shifter was offered in 62? I know he was making the three speeds but when exactly did he offer the first four speed and what was the model called?
     
  28. Shaggy
    Joined: Mar 6, 2003
    Posts: 5,208

    Shaggy
    Member
    from Sultan, WA

    Lasalle 3spd!!! It should be on par with most other newer transmissions for performance and it'll fit better, or a 60's ford topload 4 spd with jeep topshift conversion, otherwise t-10 like everyone else said orrrrrrr..... 39 3spd box because it'll fit best

    As for hurst shifter, the brackets suck for most early applications, but it is pretty easy to make your own

    Truthfully look into the ford topload, topshift conversion, it's not 100% '62 correct but it is a great unit for what you are doing
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  29. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    Competition Plus was Hurst's first four speed shifter. I've got a '62 HRM with an article about four speeds and it shows Hurst shifters for them.
     
  30. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,955

    gas pumper
    Member

    I have a 63 Muncie that I bought used in maybe 68. It came with a Hurst shifter for $75. But no arms or rods. Made my own. I think in the beginning Hurst only made one shifter handle.

    At least every one I remember had the same tapered rectangular chrome arm with one curve, all the same lenght. Is that right, HEATHEN?

    I still have the shifter and it's still works like new. Now on the Sag in the 54 Chevy.

    Frank
     

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