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Projects 1955 Ford f100 Gas tank removal

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by briganomics, Jun 30, 2012.

  1. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    How in the heck do you remove the fuel line connecting to the tank? I have the floor board up and have sprayed liquid wrench on the nut for two days. What am I doing wrong and what are my options? I have a new tank in the box itching to be installed and I'm stuck! Please help !:confused:

    There's a brass looking elbow type connector on the tank and the metal line that goes into the frame. What tools should I be using, (1/2 inch box end and a small cresent about all i can fit in there) can't seem to get anything around the brass elbow and have room for a second wrench on the fitting. Any help is appreciated!

    Brad
     
  2. Are you going through the access hole in the floor? It's tight, but doable with a wrench to hold the fitting and a tubing wrench for the line. Post a picture if you can.

    As a side note, be aware that the aftermarket fittings can be a PITA, especially with aftermarket fuel lines...some of the fittings "look" identical but aren't...so, if you can, test the new brass tank fitting on your OE fuel line before you fit the tank in place.
     
  3. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    Yes, I'm going thru the access hole in the floor. I dont have a tubing wrench, guess I need one? I acnt seem to get a wrench on the brass fitting and not the fuel line.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 1, 2012
  4. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    I'd sawzall it off but I dotn want to start a fire hehe
     

  5. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    If anyone has tips, greatly appreciated, I'm just a back yard tool jockey. I went and bought a flare nut wrench, which helped secure the top 1/2 fuel line nut, but mostly a wasterof money. The brass -odd shaped connector on the gas tank accepts a 5/8 open end box wrench, but havent been able to lossen it , in fact I've managed to bend the crap out of the fuel line and as a last resort I'm posting here for help before I cut it off lol. Running new lines doesnt look to fun so hopeful i can get this connecton apart.
     
  6. They usually sit "straight up", if that makes sense, rather than be twisted like yours. If you can, try loosening up the tank straps and pushing the tank back, while rotating the brass fitting. Possibly you can then get wrenches on both fittings simultaneously. The fuel line will be bent, but that may be no great loss at this point. I use a very thin Snap On 5/8" open-end wrench on the brass fitting.

    I've done this a few times and always managed to get it loose eventually. You've got all the greasy crud, which isn't helping, but it did a nice job at keeping the fittings corrosion-free.

    If you do end up wiping out the fuel line, and decide to buy a pre-bent line kit, get it from your tank vendor, if possible. :) Otherwise, plan to get a new angle fitting from the line vendor. There's about three different sizes used, and there's nothing like getting the line in, the tank in place, and then not being able to connect them. I actually got Heather at Mid-50s to go out to the warehouse to verify that their brass fitting would fit their stainless line, before I ordered it. She was a good sport about it. :)
     
  7. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    Thank You, got it off. I did however bend up the gas line. Can you cut and re-thread those? Or am I stuck getting a new line? Broke an Autozone ( Duralast ) 1/2 flare nut wrench in the process. I think it was frozen and the combo of the liquid wrench, WD-40, time, and moving the tank a little like you sai did the trick. Both tank straps were already loose by the way, which may have played a role in why it was cock-eyed. Check the gas line out and let me know if you think I can operate a V8 like that. Thanks!:D
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 2, 2012
  8. The line can be cut & re-flared...I would (personally speaking) double-flare it as was the factory line. However...depending on how the line is attached to the frame, you may not have enough material left to reach the tank. (There are a couple of styles of attachment depending on the assembly plant.) Most of the time you cannot move the line without removing the cab, as the line is on top of the rail. I have seen some trucks that have only two line fasteners, which can both be easily removed. Others have three or four.

    The stock line is adequate only for a stock engine or mild street cruiser...so it may be all you need, depending. Most of the factory lines I've seen are really filled with crud after all these years, and then when you start running fuel with ethanol in it, the crud decides to loosen, leading to interesting motoring experiences. :D If the truck has been continually in use, it's probably OK on the inside.

    One nice thing about the Classic Industries & Bob Drake repo tanks is that they have the bottom rear drain...which can easily accept an AN fitting for a larger fuel line...so those of us who are running engines that are not...er, H.A.M.B.-friendly...can run -8 or -10 line without much effort. :D

    I think I see a slight technical problem with the wrench!
     
  9. briganomics
    Joined: Jun 9, 2012
    Posts: 15

    briganomics
    Member

    Thanks good tips! Theres a 1962 292 in there now, I dont think that is going to satisfy my horsepower wants. I was thinking of a 351.
     

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