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Customs 1949 Buick Sedanette build--Picture heavy

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Fat47, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I did get the AC hoses crimped. One of the local NAPA guys suggested a big rig service center in Indianapolis that did all kinds of hoses. They did a good job while I waited. I also had them make a return line for the power steering pump. Post 144 noted the problem I had with JW Garage pump lines.

    I have been trying to get in a couple of hours a day on the Buick but the weather here has been awful (heat) which has required a lot more yard/pasture work so it has been slow. I do have all the lights wired in the front and am now working on finishing the wiring on the back end. Still have the engine, column and dash to go. I will post pictures of some of the other small stuff completed later.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2018
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  2. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 4,934

    BJR
    Member

    Good to here you are plugging away at it.
     
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  3. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Max and I tried some heat on the head liner but couldn't get it to shrink down. Looks like I will be looking for another upholster. As I mentioned in a previous post, after finding marking ink bleeding through the headliner I bought from an after market supplier, my upholstery guy said he could make a new one. Since he had done such a good job on the seats and door panels I agreed. Then he just stopped answering my calls. Finally, a couple of months later I tracked him down. He said he had it done and would be by to install it. After a couple more months of non responding I spent an afternoon outside his shop, which was locked up, until he came out. Came by the following week and this is what he accomplished. Then he became unreachable again. Finally, cornered him at his shop and just took all my remaining material and carpet. Drug deal going down as I entered. Talented but lost his way.
    DSCF2149.JPG DSCF2150.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2018
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  4. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    With the AC taking up almost all free space under the dash, I had to figure out where to put the audio system. Made a cardboard pattern for the back wall in the trunk.

    DSCF2136.JPG

    There was enough room between it and the back seat to mount the Custom Audio sound system. Viewed from the inside of the car. DSCF2138.JPG
    The bigger case is the CD changer. Smaller is the AM/FM/CD box. DSCF2148.JPG

    Made some brackets to hold the CD changer (faces to trunk area) and the radio. Had some left over bracketing material from another project that will work as a stop/holder for the divider. Also had a sheet of lauan from another project that I could transfer the cardboard pattern to and make a cut out for the CD changer.
    DSCF2145.JPG

    DSCF2147.JPG
    I have marked the back side of the ply where it meets the brackets so I can drill some holes and insert some plastic Christmas tree pins before I carpet the divider that will hold the wall to the brackets. This will keep it in place but allow me to remove it if necessary.
     
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  5. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    While I was making a divider/cover for the sound system I laid out a pattern in the package shelf for the sound from the speakers to come through. I didn't want to have a couple of raised speaker covers on the package shelf.

    DSCF2140.JPG
     
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  6. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 16,189

    loudbang
    Member

    Before you tear it out try renting a clothes STEAMER to use on the headliner. Get a buddy or two steam it in small sections and pull and stretch. If there is a surface to grab onto a bunch of clothespins to hold it in place while it cools and drys.

    Sometimes the combo of heat and moisture works better than just heat.
     
  7. morac41
    Joined: Jul 23, 2011
    Posts: 457

    morac41
    Member

    Undo the head liner from each end...just let it hang from the middle.....pull all the tuck ins around the edge out so there just hanging...Hope you have got some big spring clamps to hold things in place!!!...start from the center of the roof and work forward and dont be scared to pull it hard ..have the glue already sprayed around the top of the front window inner...dont worry about the sides..there last....then work from center to the rear ... same gig.....sometimes you will have to do several times to get the tension right so it dont crease.....then the tedious part is the side...a lot of patience ..I have fitted lots of headliners ... some excellent...some not so excellent but pass able.....keep at it you will get it ...just be carefull with the heat gun as the vinal will only shrink or stretch so much .....super glue is good tool to hold creases in place along stitching
     
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  8. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thanks loudbang and morac for the suggestions. I wasn't sure steam gun would work on vinyl but I will give it a try.

    I mounted the Diamond Back WW's. I kind of like the original caps and will add some trim rings.
    DSCF2151.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2018
  9. nunattax
    Joined: Jan 10, 2011
    Posts: 1,504

    nunattax
    Member

    the proportions in the picture look great.if that was my wheel id leave it as it is , PERFECT !
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
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  10. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Picked up what I think are the remaining parts I need at the Nats in Louisville last weekend. Installed the AC hoses, power steering pump return hose and the shift linkage (Kugel) today. Completed all the wiring in the rear section, including the sound system before I left. Moving on to the column, dash and engine wiring.
    Will work on fabing the MC/booster, mounting bracket tomorrow. Hope to get all the brake work done before the end of the month.
    Haven't tackled the headliner yet.
     
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  11. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    DSCF2154.JPG A fellow HAMB member had a 50 Buick and contributed a stock brake pedal and mount that goes through the frame. Bolted right up to the 49, so they must be the same. Originally the MC was on the engine side of the mount but with the 455 installed there is no room left to put a booster and MC in front of the pedal mount. Since the pedal attached on one side of the frame on a splined shaft and the actuator rod on the other side on the same splined shaft I rotated the actuator arm 180 degrees so the MC/booster can be mounted behind the pivot. I cut a hole in the X member to allow the actuator rod to run back into the space between the X member and the frame rail.
    Then the problem became the MC placement left it under the front seat, making service/fluid checking and adding complicated. So, next step is to lengthen the actuator arm and mount the MC further back so it can be accessed through a removal plate between the front and back seat. I roughed out the placement on underside of the floor with chalk so I could get an approximation of how long I would have to make the new actuator arm. Comes out to about 31 inches. DSCF2159.JPG

    The original actuator arm was 5/8" with one end flattened with a hole through it to slip over the pin on the pivot arm. The other end had a threaded hole (3/8's by 24) that would screw onto the original MC rod. A friend had several old steering columns for some Studebakers and one of them was the approximate length I needed and it was solid like the original shorter arm and was 3/4 so it had a little more meat. We cut off the worm gear that went into the steering box so I now had a 34" long solid rod. Another friend set up his metal lathe and we drilled and tapped the former steering column rod. Once I have the booster/MC mounted I can get a precise measurement on how long the actuator rod has to be, cut it to fit and heat, flatten and drill the other end to slip over the pedal arm peg.

    I also had some 1/4" plate over in the scrap pile that I set up to make a mounting bracket for the booster/MC. The next picture shows the original actuator rod, the new rod from the reclaimed steering column and the plate I am going to use for the mount (I already drilled the holes for attaching the booster). DSCF2161.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2018
  12. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It's been awhile, but I'm back on the Buick project. I think I have the MC/Booster mounting issue solved. I would have used an aftermarket bracket setup if I could have found one that would work, but as explained earlier I wanted to use the original brake pedal and I had to make some adaptations in order to have access in the floorboard to the MC without having to remove the front seat. I did think about a remote fill set up but given the proximity of the planned exhaust system and some other logistic issues it didn't seem feasible. So, here is what I did: As I mentioned previously, I made a longer actuator rod which allowed me to move the MC mounting point further back. I had to cut a hole in the X member to run the rod back to the MC.
    DSCF2160.JPG
    Once I had the approximate location for mounting the MC I made a bracket out of 1x2 box tubing that would bolt between the outer frame rail and the plate where the arms of the X member join. I cut the mounting plate that I had drilled out (earlier picture) down to a size that would fit under the floorboard, rounded the bottom edge, leaving enough to protect the booster, and tack welded it to the bracket. I threaded the actuator arm that I had made out of an old steering column, onto the booster, leaving enough threads to adjust it, and cut the actuator shaft to the desired length.
    DSCF2194.JPG
    The next view is from the back of the car looking forward toward the engine to give you a better perspective.
    DSCF2197.JPG
    While the mounting bracket might have been strong enough, once I finished welding the parts together, I didn't want to chance that the top of the mounting plate might eventually start to tip back and cause binding where the actuator rod threads into the booster. Plus, I was worried that the weight of the long actuator rod (31 inches) and its weight, given that the only two points of connection were at the front where it slips over the pedal peg and the back where it threads onto the booster might also cause eventual binding. So, I made another bracket further forward towards the engine. It's on the right side of the picture with the rounded plate in the center of the 1x1 box tubing that mounts to the top of the outer frame rail (two bolts) running on a level to the X member about 15 inches forward of the MC/booster bracket . I had some scrap 2" wide 1/4" plate (yellow piece) that I put a 90 bend on one end and mounted it to the top of the MC mounting plate(at the back) and drilled the 1/2 moon plate on the forward bracket to bold it there. The same friend that had taped the front of the actuator rod also made me a sleeve with a grease cert that the rod could slide through and I welded it to a tab that bolts to the yellow plate. This set up should keep the actuator rod in place and the top of the MC mounting plate from tipping back. So, there are three pieces that bolt together, allowing them to be disassembled if necessary, that should keep everything in place and allow the MC to be accessed via a cover plate behind the front seat.
    DSCF2205.JPG
     
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  13. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,301

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I also have a 49 Super Sedanette and it will be my next project. I plan a total frame off build to do it right. It has a 455/TH400 setup in it and was built about 25 years ago by some amateurs. I had to install an Art Morrison 4 link and panhard bar to replace the cobbled up triangulated 4 link they attempted. After that, it drives well enough that I use it for parts chasing and local trips. Before, it was pretty scary to drive.

    You are doing a great job and keeping it stock appearing, which is my plan. I especially love the instruments and dash in these and plan to keep that look. One problem is the GIANT steering wheel. It is just too large in diameter for me to use what is your plan for a steering wheel?
     
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  14. looking at how bunched up the headliner is at the seams, it looks like all you might need to do is, trim back the cloth bow strips ( the cloth sleeves that the headliner bows slide through). I've had that happen on a few installs, all it took was to cut each side of the strips back another 1/4-1/2". Then pull it tight, & re-staple
     
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  15. 40StudeDude
    Joined: Sep 19, 2002
    Posts: 9,317

    40StudeDude
    Member

    Walt, finally caught up on your build thread...it's all looking good, glad to see you're back on it...

    Have been on my '48 Cad (again) since August, 2017...have made a lot of progress in the year since and the goal is to have the car streetable by the first of the year...below is an"art shot" I took at dusk one nite as I was heading for the house...shows you where I'm currently at in the build. One of these first days, I'll start a build thread on this one...and this one is to be a mild kustom...

    R- IMG_8226.JPG
     
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  16. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    "Rockable"--Since I updated the front rack, I installed a newer steering column out of a GM box van that has a splined shaft smaller than the stock wheel. Currently I have a 15" stock chevy wheel mounted. I have been looking for a comparable Buick wheel, something out of the late 50's or early 60's but haven't found anything yet.

    "Abone"---Thanks for the suggestions on the headliner. They go along with some early replies to this thread. I have watched several internet videos on installation of headliners and they also suggest trimming back the listings a bit and using steam and clamps. I bought a clothes steamer at Walmart this morning. Now I just have to find a source for glue that I can brush on in something smaller than a five gallon container which is the size my local NAPA store has. I don't want to use a spray can for fear of getting it all over. A quart can would be more than sufficient.

    Roger----The 48 looks like it is coming along. Body style is almost the same at the 49 Buick sedanettes. I have used several Cad parts---they seem to be easier to find than the Buick's.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2018
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  17. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,301

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Walt, these guys have some wheels that merit consideration and they even have a color close to yours. BTW, I love the color! There is a section where you can customize the wheel to your liking.

    https://con2r.com/products/steering-wheels/
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2018
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  18. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    DSCF2207.JPG Here is a picture of various parts fabed for the booster/MC/actuator rod after cleaning them up and painting before I re-installed all of it this afternoon. Miraculously, it all bolted back together and seemed to work. I also installed a spring on the pedal to make sure it returns to its starting point and I don't have the brakes lock up.
     
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  19. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Rockable-----Thanks for the reference. I remember looking at the Conair wheels a couple of years ago at one of the trade shows and was impressed with their work. The mint green Bonneville wheel on their website looks like it would match up. I just have to justify spending $300 plus.
     
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  20. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Bolted the brackets and the MC/Booster back together. Hope to get the brake lines all formed and trial fit this week. Then remove the MC, and bench bleed it. Maybe try to bleed the lines, but don't have the engine running yet so no vacuum for the booster. Will also cut out a hole in the floor board behind front seat to access the MC and make a cover for it.

    I've been watching some videos on installing headliners and how they get the wrinkles out with a steamer and some pulling. most of the ones I've watched have tack strips along the edges which I don't so I will have to figure that out.

    I did install the door panels and garnish moldings and the back side panels. Slipped the back seat in to test fit it. Will pull the seat out to work on the headliner and the package tray installation. You can also see the first approximation for the carpet. Two piece----toe board to under front seat shown--back seat piece not cut yet.
    DSCF2188.JPG DSCF2190.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2018
  21. 40StudeDude
    Joined: Sep 19, 2002
    Posts: 9,317

    40StudeDude
    Member

    Nice...really looking good...

    R-
     
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  22. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,301

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I lurve that! (See Woody Allen for more explanation.)
     
  23. Fabber McGee
    Joined: Nov 22, 2013
    Posts: 630

    Fabber McGee
    Member

    Vacuum is not necessary for bleeding brakes. Just need it for stopping the big beautiful beast. Best and easiest way to bleed brakes is with a pressure bleeder (bleeder ball), good chance you could rent one.
     
  24. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Back brakes are plumbed. Working on the front. I had to mount the sway bar on the back side of the front cross member, because of the radiator bracket, resulting in a really tight fit between the bar ends and the caliper. Finally found some rubber flex lines that were long enough at Master Power Brakes and was able to weld the line brackets high enough on the frame to, hopefully, avoid pinching the lines. I have read here on HAMB that people have had success bending the ends of sway bars. I may try that if the clearance issue becomes a problem. Now I have to bend the hard lines to get back to the MC. Pictures when I get this done.

    One step forward--two backward on the battery box location. The "idiot" light on my brain was apparently on. Killing time at an antique shop last may while on vacation with the wife, I ran across an Old Porter-Cable metal carrying case for a heavy duty circular saw. It had a hinged top with two pull catches on the front. Saw was gone. Paid $5. Somehow I became totally focused on painting this box to match the upholstery, putting the battery in it and affixing it to the trunk floor on top of the eventual carpet. I didn't like the idea of it taking up trunk space but I didn't want it in the engine compartment and I couldn't find an accessible spot somewhere else. Had the mounting and cable holes drilled in the box and trunk floor and ready to bolt it in. Luckily, the day ended and I went to bed. Middle of the night it dawned on me that 25 years ago, when I built a 47 Chevy I put in a dropped battery box where the spare tire well had been. What had I been thinking? Checked it out and I have plenty of room to do this. Drilled out the spot welds that held on the hinge and the catches, removed the top and the box will drop in nicely when I cut out that part of the floor where the spare tire well used to be.
    DSCF2208.JPG
    Fab up a lid to go under the carpet and it will be out of sight. Will post other pictures later.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2019
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  25. Fabber McGee
    Joined: Nov 22, 2013
    Posts: 630

    Fabber McGee
    Member

    Where does the spare tire go?
     
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  26. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 4,934

    BJR
    Member

    I put mine under the front seat sunk in the floor on the passenger side.
     
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  27. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 9,961

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    For most people.....around their waist line.......;)
     
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  28. 1959Nomad
    Joined: Jun 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,927

    1959Nomad
    Member

    [​IMG]
    Tried to find it but, what did you use on the floor under the carpeting for insulation/sound deading?
     
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  29. Fat47
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,144

    Fat47
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    59 Nomad-----I think I covered it earlier in this thread but maybe not. I have a friend who was duct/pipe wrapper who used the material in big commercial jobs. He had used it for years in his builds. His son now owns a business doing the same thing and I was able to get rolls of it from him. I think they are 36" wide. Like Dynamatt, which I used on the roof, this product has a self sticking underside. I have also used Peel and Seal from Lowe's but it only comes in 6" wide rolls.
     
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  30. 1959Nomad
    Joined: Jun 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,927

    1959Nomad
    Member

    Thanks, do you know what the the stuff you used s called?
     
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